10' to Kill
0 expansion(s).

10' to Kill is a deduction game for 2-4 players that's played in about ten minutes. There are 16 characters on the board, and each player secretly embodies one of them. Each player also has three secret targets they must eliminate, without being discovered. The players have two actions each turn from the following choices: move any character anywhere on the board, eliminate a character (different ways of doing this), or make an identity check by the police. The trick is that when a character is eliminated, nobody says by whom or how! You must apply yourself in blending your true hitman in a crowd of possible suspects, or guess which character is the hitman of the other players. As time goes by in 10' to Kill, you will feel pressure and suspicion weigh on your shoulders. Ten minutes is a short time, but it can sometimes be very long when all eyes are on you! You'll have to bluff and use discretion to eliminate your targets...and maybe the competitor's hitman! Are you ready to become the most prestigious hitman?

Expansions


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1775: Rebellion
0 expansion(s).

The Birth of America series continues with The American Revolution. In 1775: Rebellion, players take the roles of the American Continental Army and Patriots against the British Army and the Loyalists. Each side tries to control the colonies, provinces and territories. They call on the aid of Native Americans, as well as the German Hessians and French Army in order to successfully birth a revolution or quell the rebellion. The four factions each use their own deck of cards to move their units into postions. Battles are resolved quickly with custom dice. If you can control an entire colony, province or territory you raise a flag. When the game ends with the signing of the Treaty of Paris, the side with the most flag markers is the winner. 1775: Rebellion uses the same basic mechanisms as 1812: The Invasion of Canada, but to a different end result. The game is quicker (being 2-4 player) and the intermingling of units at the beginning of the game allows the action to start immediately. There are a few core rules that changed in order to better portray the goals of the war. The game also comes with an advanced scenario, "The Siege of Quebec". We recommend this for players comfortable with the basic rules. Winner of BGG "Golden Geek 2013" Award for "Best Wargame."

Expansions


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1830: Railways & Robber Barons
0 expansion(s).

1830 is one of the most famous 18xx games. One of the things some gamers like about this game is that the game has 'no chance' element. That is to say, if players wished to play two games with the same moves, the outcome would be the same also. This game takes the basic mechanics from Tresham's 1829, and adds several new elements. Players are seeking to make the most money by buying and selling stock in various share companies located on eastern United States map. The stock manipulation aspect of the game is widely-regarded as one of the best. The board itself is actually a fairly abstract hexagonal system, with track tiles placed on top of the hexes. Plus each 18xx title adds new and different elements to the game. This game features private rail companies and an extremely vicious, 'robber baron' oriented stock market. A game is finished when the bank runs out of money or one player is forced to declare bankruptcy, and the player with the greatest personal holdings wins. The 2011 version of 1830 was published by Mayfair Games in partnership with Lookout Games of Germany. This publication was developed under license from Francis Tresham in co-operation with Bruce Shelley (the original 1830 developer). This version contains rules and components for Francis Tresham's original classic design, a faster-playing basic game, and new variants from some of the world's best railroad game developers.

Expansions


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1960: The Making of the President
0 expansion(s).

From the author: "Sometimes the history of a nation can be defined by the relationship between two individuals. The Election of 1960 is the story of two men, John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon. One is the scion of a wealthy, politically powerful family from New England. The other is the son of a Quaker grocer in Whittier, California. While they belong to opposing political parties, they start out as friends. The complex development of that friendship, however, would shape a pivotal presidential election and cast a long shadow over American history for the remainder of the 20th century. "In 1960: The Making of the President, you take on the role of one of these great protagonists vying for the right to lead his country into the heart of the Cold War. However, it is not just foreign policy that poses a challenge to American leadership; this is also an era of great social turmoil and progress. As the United States continues to build upon the promise of its founding, candidates must contend with the question of civil rights and balance their positions on social justice against the need for valuable Southern electoral votes. Of course, the ever-present issue of the economy also rears its ugly head, and both Nixon and Kennedy will compete to be the candidate with the voters' pocket books in mind. "The contest is fought out on an electoral map of the United States as it stood in 1960—a map where Louisiana and Florida share the same number of electoral votes, as do California and Pennsylvania. Using a card-driven game system, all the major events which shaped the campaign are represented: Nixon’s lazy shave, President Eisenhower’s late endorsement, and the 'Catholic question' are all included as specific event cards. The famous televised debates and final election day push are each handled with their own subsystems. Candidates vie to capture each state’s electoral votes using campaign points in the four different regions of the country. At the same time, they must build momentum by dominating the issues of the day and attempt to gain control of the airwaves. "As with any election campaign, the challenge is to adapt your game plan as the ground shifts out from under you. There are never enough resources or time to do everything, but you need to make the tough calls to propel yourself into the White House. This fast-playing strategy game for two players challenges you to run for the most powerful elective office in the world, at one of its most unique crossroads. Will you recreate history, or rewrite it? 1960: The Making of the President provides you the opportunity to do both."

Expansions


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1989: Dawn of Freedom
0 expansion(s).

"History punishes those who come too late." - Mikhail Gorbachev 1989: Dawn of Freedom is an exciting, fast paced game simulating the end of the Cold War in 1989. During this amazing year, a series of democratic revolutions ended the 40 year Soviet empire in Eastern Europe. 1989 simulates the political, social and economic aspects of these revolutions using a card-driven system similar to Twilight Struggle. "No man is so old he cannot live one more year." - Leszek Kolakowski One player plays the Communist. At the start of the game he holds unquestioned power across the six nations of the Warsaw Pact. But there are ominous clouds on the horizon. The new leader in Moscow has declared no more will Soviet tanks prop up tottering Communist governments. The economies, after decades of central planning and stagnation, have reached various stages of crisis. Inside the churches and among the students and their professors there are dissident movements that have been emboldened. From crushing dissent to offering concessions, the Communist player will have to use a variety of strategies in a struggle to hold on to his empire. "A bad regime is never in so great danger as when it tries to improve." - Alexis de Tocqueville The other player plays the Democrat. At the dawn of 1989, behind the iron curtain, no one considers revolution possible. The goal of dissidents is to create a civil society outside the control of the Communist regimes. On their side are students who are fascinated with the style and pop culture of the west, and the Church. Against them is the vast apparatus of the Communist state. Their challenge is to persuade the workers, who are the bulk of society, to join their cause. "Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate. Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!" - Ronald Reagan

Expansions


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4 Gods
0 expansion(s).

Four Gods is a real-time tile-laying game in which players create a world — one tile at a time — before laying claim to one of the four gods of their world and attempting to win followers by sending prophets into that world. In more detail, players sit outside of a cardboard frame that represents the limits of the world. Each player starts with two randomly-drawn tiles in hand, with each double-sided tile depicting 1-3 types of landscape out of the four types present in the world. When play begins, each player simultaneously starts laying tiles into the frame; each tile must be adjacent to two sides to be placed, so initially tiles can be placed only in the corners of the frames, with players building inward from there. Players can place tiles anywhere that they can legally be placed (two sides are adjacent to the frame or previously placed tiles and all landscapes match across tile borders. Instead of placing a tile, a player can place it in their personal discard area, which can hold at most ten tiles. When a player has both hands free, they can draw two new tiles from the bag; alternatively, any player with a free hand can pick up any tile in any discard area and place it in the world. At any point during the game, a player can claim one of four gods and that god's followers. Each god is associated with a particular type of landscape, e.g., the merfolk god. Once a player has followers, they can place a prophet on a tile they just placed to claim that section of landscape. Players can place any number of prophets in a landscape as long as they're placing each prophet on a tile they just added to the world. At any point in the game, if a player thinks that a section of the board cannot be filled with a tile — e.g., a space that's surrounded by four types of landscapes — that player can place a round city marker in that space, and then claim that city with a prophet. If a matching tile is found later, a player can "smash" and collect that city, replacing it with the tile. Once the world is filled or players agree that no more tiles can be placed, the game ends. Each player scores five points for each city occupied or smashed. Each landscape with one or more prophets is worth a number of points to the player(s) with the most prophets in it equal to the number of tiles in that landscape minus the number of prophets in it. The landscape with the largest mass rewards its god with a large bonus, with the second and third largest masses rewarding their gods with smaller bonuses; similarly, the landscape that appears in the most distinct groups rewards its god with a large bonus, with the second and third largest groups again rewarding their gods with smaller bonuses. Whichever god has scored the most points wins!

Expansions


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504
0 expansion(s).

In a distant future, scientists were able to build small alternate Earths. Exactly 504 such Earths have thus far been built. The scientists programmed each of these Worlds with an individual set of laws and rules which the residents strictly follow and consider most important for their lives. These may be exploration, consumption, economics, military, etc., and each is unique. You can visit all of these 504 alternate Earths to experience how the people are living, and decide which of these worlds harbors the best civilization. On which World do you want to live? Explore them all and decide! 504 is a game that creates 504 different games out of one box. The game consists of nine modules: Module 1: Pick-Up & Deliver Module 2: Race Module 3: Privileges Module 4: Military Module 5: Exploration Module 6: Roads Module 7: Majorities Module 8: Production Module 9: Shares In each single game, you take three different modules from the nine available and assemble them in any order you like to create a new game. (504 = 9 * 8 * 7 = the number of distinct permutations of three items from a set of nine. The order of the three game modules is significant, and modules cannot be repeated.) For example, you can play: a racing game that expands through exploration with technology improving the racing or exploration (World "253"). an 18XX-style stock game with network building for income and production sites to provide workers for the road building (World "968"). a war game with a pick-up and deliver economy and bonus scoring from majorities ("World 417"). Each single game takes from 30 to 120 minutes to play.

Expansions


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6 nimmt!
0 expansion(s).

In 6 nimmt!, a.k.a. Category 5 and many other names, you want to score as few points as possible. To play the game, you shuffle the 104 number cards, lay out four cards face-up to start the four rows, then deal ten cards to each player. Each turn, players simultaneously choose and reveal a card from their hand, then add the cards to the rows, with cards being placed in ascending order based on their number; specifically, each card is placed in the row that ends with the highest number that's below the card's number. When the sixth card is placed in a row, the owner of that card claims the other five cards and the sixth card becomes the first card in a new row. In addition to a number from 1 to 104, each card has a point value. After finishing ten rounds, players tally their score and see whether the game ends. (Category 5 ends when a player has a score greater than 74, for example, while 6 nimmt! ends when someone tops 66.) When this happens, the player with the fewest points wins! 6 nimmt! works with 2-10 players, and the dynamics of gameplay change the more players that you have. One variant for the game has you use 34 cards, 44 cards, 54 cards, etc. (instead of all 104 cards) when you have three, four, five, etc. number of players. This change allows you to know which cards are in play, thereby allowing you to track which cards have been played and (theoretically) make better choices as to which card to play when.

Expansions


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7 Wonders
2 expansion(s).

You are the leader of one of the 7 great cities of the Ancient World. Gather resources, develop commercial routes, and affirm your military supremacy. Build your city and erect an architectural wonder which will transcend future times. 7 Wonders lasts three ages. In each age, players receive seven cards from a particular deck, choose one of those cards, then pass the remainder to an adjacent player. Players reveal their cards simultaneously, paying resources if needed or collecting resources or interacting with other players in various ways. (Players have individual boards with special powers on which to organize their cards, and the boards are double-sided). Each player then chooses another card from the deck they were passed, and the process repeats until players have six cards in play from that age. After three ages, the game ends. In essence, 7 Wonders is a card development game. Some cards have immediate effects, while others provide bonuses or upgrades later in the game. Some cards provide discounts on future purchases. Some provide military strength to overpower your neighbors and others give nothing but victory points. Each card is played immediately after being drafted, so you'll know which cards your neighbor is receiving and how his choices might affect what you've already built up. Cards are passed left-right-left over the three ages, so you need to keep an eye on the neighbors in both directions. Though the box of earlier editions is listed as being for 3–7 players, there is an official 2-player variant included in the instructions.

Expansions

  7 Wonders: Leaders

  7 Wonders: Cities


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7 Wonders Duel
1 expansion(s).

In many ways 7 Wonders Duel resembles its parent game 7 Wonders as over three ages players acquire cards that provide resources or advance their military or scientific development in order to develop a civilization and complete wonders. What's different about 7 Wonders Duel is that, as the title suggests, the game is solely for two players, with the players not drafting cards simultaneously from hands of cards, but from a display of face-down and face-up cards arranged at the start of a round. A player can take a card only if it's not covered by any others, so timing comes into play as well as bonus moves that allow you to take a second card immediately. As in the original game, each card that you acquire can be built, discarded for coins, or used to construct a wonder. Each player starts with four wonder cards, and the construction of a wonder provides its owner with a special ability. Only seven wonders can be built, though, so one player will end up short. Players can purchase resources at any time from the bank, or they can gain cards during the game that provide them with resources for future building; as you acquire resources, the cost for those particular resources increases for your opponent, representing your dominance in this area. A player can win 7 Wonders Duel in one of three ways: each time you acquire a military card, you advance the military marker toward your opponent's capital, giving you a bonus at certain positions; if you reach the opponent's capital, you win the game immediately; similarly, if you acquire any six of seven different scientific symbols, you achieve scientific dominance and win immediately; if none of these situations occurs, then the player with the most points at the end of the game wins.

Expansions

  7 Wonders Duel: Pantheon


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A Few Acres of Snow
0 expansion(s).

A Few Acres of Snow is a two-player, deck-building game about the French and British conflict in North America. The card-play contains a focus on a deck-building mechanic similar to Dominion, each card will have multiple uses like card-driven game. The players have to choose only one aspect of the card to use when it is played. Each space captured by a player will add another card to the capturing player's deck. From the box description: A war fought at the edge of two mighty empires. For over one hundred and fifty years Britain and France were locked in a struggle for domination of North America. Thousands of miles from their homes, settlers and soldiers were faced with impenetrable forests, unpredictable American tribes, and formidable distances. Despite these obstacles they were able to engage in bitter warfare, with the British ultimately taking the prize of Quebec. A Few Acres of Snow is a two-player game that allows you to recreate this contest. You can change the course of history by your decisions. A Few Acres of Snow takes an innovative approach to the subject, using cards to represent locations and manpower. As the game progresses you add to your selection of cards, increasing the range of actions available to you. There are many strategies to be explored. How quickly should you build up your forces, do you employ Native Americans, what energy should be expended on your economy? The game is about more than just fighting – you must successfully colonize the land to have a chance.

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A Game of Thrones: The Board Game (Second Edition)
0 expansion(s).

Game description from the publisher: King Robert Baratheon is dead, and the lands of Westeros brace for battle. In the second edition of A Game of Thrones: The Board Game, three to six players take on the roles of the great Houses of the Seven Kingdoms of Westeros, as they vie for control of the Iron Throne through the use of diplomacy and warfare. Based on the best-selling A Song of Ice and Fire series of fantasy novels by George R.R. Martin, A Game of Thrones is an epic board game in which it will take more than military might to win. Will you take power through force, use honeyed words to coerce your way onto the throne, or rally the townsfolk to your side? Through strategic planning, masterful diplomacy, and clever card play, spread your influence over Westeros! To begin the game, each player receives an army of Footman, Knight, Siege Engine, and Ship units, as well as a set of Order tokens and other necessary components. Each player also receives a deck of unique House Cards, which are used as leaders in battles against rival Houses. Each round in the game is made up of three phases: the Westeros Phase, the Planning Phase, and the Action Phase. The Westeros Phase represents special events and day-to-day activities in Westeros. There are three different Westeros Decks, and each denotes a different global action, potentially affecting all players. The Planning Phase is perhaps the most important. Here you secretly assign orders to all of your units by placing one order token face down on each area you control that contains at least one unit (Knight, Footman, Ship, or Siege Engine). This portion of the game emphasizes diplomacy and deduction. Can you trust the alliance that you made? Will you betray your ally and march upon him? Players may make promises to each other (for aid or peace, for example), but these promises are never binding. The result is tense and compelling negotiations, often ending in backstabbing worthy of Westeros! During the Action Phase, the orders are resolved and battle is entered! When armies meet in combat, they secretly choose one of their House cards to add strength to the battle. Finally, the Houses can consolidate their power in the areas they control and use that power in future turns to influence their position in the court of the Iron Throne and to stand against the wildling Hordes. In addition to featuring updated graphics and a clarified ruleset, this second edition of A Game of Thrones includes elements from the A Clash of Kings and A Storm of Swords expansions, including ports, garrisons, Wildling cards, and Siege engines, while introducing welcome new innovations like player screens and Tides of Battle cards. Tides of Battle cards are an optional mechanism that brings an element of unpredictability to combat, representing erratic shifts in the momentum of war due to factors such as weather, morale, and tactical opportunity. During each combat, both players draw one Tides of Battle card from a communal deck, and its value modifies the strength of his chosen House card. What's more, such a card may also contain icons that can affect the outcome of the battle...all of which delivers a new level of intensity to your military engagements. Expanded by: A Game of Thrones: The Board Game (Second Edition) – A Dance with Dragons (2012) A Game of Thrones: The Board Game (Second Edition) – A Feast for Crows (2013) Reimplements: A Game of Thrones (first edition) (2003) A Game of Thrones: A Clash of Kings Expansion (2004) A Game of Thrones: A Storm of Swords Expansion (2006)

Expansions


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A Study in Emerald (second edition)
0 expansion(s).

It is 1882, and the Old Ones are already here. They arrived seven hundred years ago and have been ruling the planet ever since. The majority of people just get on with their lives, accepting their monstrous rulers. However, a growing band of revolutionaries wish to free mankind from their slavery. These freedom fighters call themselves the Restorationists. A secret war has already broken out between the Restorationists and the forces loyal to the Old Ones. The invention of dynamite has changed the balance of power, and a lone assassin now has the capacity to destroy an Old One. In this shadow world of assassins, informers, police agents and anarchists, nobody is quite sure who is who and which side they fight for. The game A Study in Emerald draws its central plot from the award-winning short story penned by Neil Gaiman, in which the worlds of Sherlock Holmes and H.P. Lovecraft are combined to telling effect. However, to create a world detailed enough for players, much has been added from real history. The nineteenth century was a time of unrest, with many colorful characters fighting both for and against the authorities. A Study in Emerald is the outcome of the merging of these three worlds. This second edition of A Study in Emerald sports new artwork by Ian O'Toole and Tatiana Kuzilova along with a streamlined set of rules that will hopefully help those folks who found the first version a tad complicated. Inconsistencies have been removed and the number of available actions has been reduced to the minimum, whilst still retaining the mood of paranoia from the first edition.

Expansions


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Abalone
0 expansion(s).

This beautiful and functional board has room for two teams of large marbles. Players take turns pushing the marbles around the board, with the goal of pushing six of the opposing player's marbles off the board. The central idea is that a column of marbles has weight given by the number of marbles in line. Someone will need to push with a heavier group of marbles in order to push the column along that axis. However, with six possible directions, it's difficult to defend yourself perfectly. Also, it's possible to play the game with up to six players when supplemental marble sets are purchased.

Expansions


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Above and Below
0 expansion(s).

Your last village was ransacked by barbarians. You barely had time to pick up the baby and your favorite fishing pole before they started the burning and pillaging. You wandered over a cruel desert, braved frozen peaks, and even paddled a log across a rough sea, kicking at the sharks whenever they got too close, the baby strapped tightly to your back. Then you found it! The perfect place to make your new home. But as soon as you had the first hut built, you discovered a vast network of caverns underground, brimming with shiny treasures, rare resources, and untold adventure. How could you limit your new village to the surface? You immediately start organizing expeditions and building houses underground as well as on the surface. With any luck, you'll build a village even stronger than your last-- strong enough, even, to turn away the barbarians the next time they come knocking. Above and Below is a mashup of town-building and storytelling where you and up to three friends compete to build the best village above and below ground. In the game, you send your villagers to perform jobs like exploring the cave, harvesting resources, and constructing houses. Each villager has unique skills and abilities, and you must decide how to best use them. You have your own personal village board, and you slide the villagers on this board to various areas to indicate that they've been given jobs to do. Will you send Hanna along on the expedition to the cave? Or should she instead spend her time teaching important skills to one of the young villagers? A great cavern lies below the surface, ready for you to explore-- this is where the storytelling comes in. When you send a group of villagers to explore the depths, one of your friends reads what happens to you from a book of paragraphs. You'll be given a choice of how to react, and a lot will depend on which villagers you brought on the expedition, and who you're willing to sacrifice to succeed. The book of paragraphs is packed with encounters of amazing adventure, randomly chosen each time you visit the cavern. At the end of the game, the player with the most well-developed village wins! The Kickstarter version of the game included the following items which are not found in the Retail version: Villager Tool tokens Lost Villagers Swamp Villagers Exclusive Stretch goals: Creature Villagers Quest Tokens Underforest Tokens and PDF story book Desert Labyrinth tokens and PDF story book Wooden Goods This collection of items can be found in Above and Below: Expanded Edition exclusives

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Abraca...what?
0 expansion(s).

Abraca...what? is a family game of deduction and spellcasting. On your turn, you try to cast one of the spells you have in front of you — but it's harder than it looks because only the other players can see which spells are available to you! So with cunning wit, clever logic, and a little luck, you have to determine which spells to use against your competitors. Watch your magic words, though, because if you try to cast the wrong spell too often, you'll lose the game!

Expansions


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Abyss
1 expansion(s).

The Abyss power is once again vacant, so the time has come to get your hands on the throne and its privileges. Use all of your cunning to win or buy votes in the Council. Recruit the most influential Lords and abuse their powers to take control of the most strategic territories. Finally, impose yourself as the only one able to rule the Abyssal people! Abyss is a game of development, combination and collection in which players try to take control of strategic locations in an underwater city. To achieve this, players must develop on three levels: first by collecting allies, then using them to recruit Lords of the Abyss, who will then grant access to different parts of the city. Players acquire cards through a draft of sorts, and the Lords of the Abyss acquired on those cards grant special powers to the cardholder — but once you use the cards to acquire a location, that power is shut off, so players need to time their land grabs well in order to put themselves in the best position for when the game ends.

Expansions

  Abyss: Kraken


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Acquire
0 expansion(s).

In Acquire, each player strategically invests in businesses, trying to retain a majority of stock. As the businesses grow with tile placements, they also start merging, giving the majority stockholders of the acquired business sizable bonuses, which can then be used to reinvest into other chains. All of the investors in the acquired company can then cash in their stocks for current value or trade them 2-for-1 for shares of the newer, larger business. The game is a race to acquire the greatest wealth. This Sid Sackson classic has taken many different forms over the years depending on the publisher. Some versions of the 3M bookshelf edition included rules for a 2-player variant. The original version is part of the 3M Bookshelf Series. Note: many books and websites list this as a 1962 publication. This is incorrect; information from Sid Sackson's diaries, correspondence, and royalty statements prove that it was published in 1964. However, for some reason admins continue to accept "corrections" of the publication date to 1962. A detailed timeline of the development and publication of the game can be found at https://opinionatedgamers.com/2014/05/29/how-acquire-became-acquire/, for those interested.

Expansions


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Age of Gods
0 expansion(s).

In this game the players are ancient gods that are trying to make their chosen tribes prosper and conquer the land. The twist is that the gods/players don't know all their chosen tribes at the beginning of the game, these are given to them only every other round. There are 24 different tribes which start on predefined spaces on the board. These tribes are divided into four different levels and have as many counters on the board at the beginning of the game as their level indicates (1, 2, 3 or 4 tokens). The biggest part of the game are the battles between the tribes. The funny part is that the players are not restricted to use their tribes in the fighting, they can make other tribes fight among themselves. If you read French, check out the link to the official web site in the links section.

Expansions


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Age of Steam
0 expansion(s).

Steam-belching iron horses roar across the wild plains! Age of Steam relives the era when pioneering U.S. railroads built the tracks that transformed America's economy. The cut-throat action is centered on the industrial powerhouses of the growing nation: Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago, and beyond. Challenges that await you: Can you finance both the most extensive track network and the most powerful locomotives? Which routes will give the best returns on their costs? Can you beat the opposition to the most lucrative shipments? Will you make enough money to pay your aggressive creditors? Competition is brutal, with the game usually going to the player who plans most carefully. Each self-contained phase in the game keeps players constantly involved in making vital decisions and interacting with other players. Age of Steam also allows towns to be developed into cities, ensuring that no two games are exactly the same.

Expansions


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Age of War
0 expansion(s).

Age of War is a quick-playing game of conquest. Fourteen cards are laid out at the start of the game, each showing one castle and the symbols required to conquer this castle, with the symbols separated into battle lines. Each castle belongs to a clan, with some clans having only a single castle and some having up to four castles. A player starts his turn by rolling seven dice, the six sides of which show archery, cavalry, daimyo, and 1-3 infantry. He then selects a card and uses the symbols rolled to conquer exactly one of the battle lines on this card (by placing the appropriate dice on that line). If he can do this, he then rolls the remaining dice, ideally conquering another line; if he can't conquer a line, he removes one die from play, then rolls again. His turn ends when either he conquers every line on the card (in which case he claims it) or he no longer has dice available to roll. Each card is worth a number of victory points. You can conquer cards owned by other players, but you need to conquer an additional daimyo line in the process. If a player owns all the castles of one clan, however, those castles are secure and cannot be stolen. What's more, these castles are now worth more points because you've united the clan under one ruler (you) and strengthened your hold over Japan. When the last card is claimed, players tally their points, and whoever has the highest score wins.

Expansions


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Agents of SMERSH
0 expansion(s).

A STORYTELLING BOARD GAME SET IN THE 1970s COLD WAR ERA. SMERSH is a portmanteau of two Russian words that translates to "Death to Spies." It operated as a counter-intelligence agency by the Red Army during the 1940s. Despite having had a large number of paid employees, little was known about the agency until recently when Russia opened their archives. Agents of SMERSH is a cooperative Storytelling game that pits players as UN Secret Service Spies set in an alternate 1970s timeline against a newly formed and independent SMERSH. Agents of SMERSH includes custom dice to determine success or failure of encounters, and more strategic play from what is typically expected of a Storytelling board game. There are plenty of James Bond gadgets, guns, cars, pop references and detailed artwork - not to mention a touch of humor. The game features the artwork of George Patsouras (The Resistance & Flash Point). The game is able to accommodate play with either The Encounter Book, which contains over 1500 written encounters with a similar reaction matrix to Tales of the Arabian Nights - or played more simply with only encounter cards with shorter encounters and no matrix. The First Edition (2012) of the game came with the Encounter Cards as standard, and the Encounter Book as an optional add-on (although many copies did actually include the book). The Second Edition (2015) includes the Encounter Book as standard, with the Encounter Cards available to purchase from the publisher.

Expansions


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Agricola
1 expansion(s).

Description from BoardgameNews In Agricola, you're a farmer in a wooden shack with your spouse and little else. On a turn, you get to take only two actions, one for you and one for the spouse, from all the possibilities you'll find on a farm: collecting clay, wood, or stone; building fences; and so on. You might think about having kids in order to get more work accomplished, but first you need to expand your house. And what are you going to feed all the little rugrats? The game supports many levels of complexity, mainly through the use (or non-use) of two of its main types of cards, Minor Improvements and Occupations. In the beginner's version (called the Family Variant in the U.S. release), these cards are not used at all. For advanced play, the U.S. release includes three levels of both types of cards; Basic (E-deck), Interactive (I-deck), and Complex (K-deck), and the rulebook encourages players to experiment with the various decks and mixtures thereof. Aftermarket decks such as the Z-Deck and the L-Deck also exist. Agricola is a turn-based game. There are 14 game rounds occurring in 6 stages, with a Harvest at the end of each stage (after Rounds 4, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 14). Each player starts with two playing tokens (farmer and spouse) and thus can take two turns, or actions, per round. There are multiple options, and while the game progresses, you'll have more and more: first thing in a round, a new action card is flipped over. Problem: Each action can be taken by only one player each round, so it's important to do some things with high preference. Each player also starts with a hand of 7 Occupation cards (of more than 160 total) and 7 Minor Improvement cards (of more than 140 total) that he/she may use during the game if they fit in his/her strategy. Speaking of which, there are countless strategies, some depending on your card hand. Sometimes it's a good choice to stay on course, and sometimes it is better to react to your opponents' actions.

Expansions

  Agricola: Farmers of the Moor


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Akrotiri
0 expansion(s).

Akrotiri places you in the role of an explorer in Classical Greek times, combing the then-uncharted Aegean sea for lost Minoan temples that have long ago fallen into ruin. You've not only heard of these temples hidden around the island of Thera, but you actually have access to the secret maps that tell you of their hidden locations! Two mountains to the north? A volcano to the west? This *must* be the spot... But running an expedition can be costly. In order to fund your voyages into the unknown and excavate the ancient temples, you will have to first ship resources found on surrounding islands back to the resource-poor island of Thera. In Akrotiri — which combines tile placement, hand management, and pick-up and delivery — players place land tiles in order to make the board match the maps that they have in hand. Players excavate temples; the ones that are harder to find and the ones further away from Thera are worth more towards victory, but the secret goal cards keep everyone guessing who the victor is until the end! May the gods forever bless you with favorable winds!

Expansions


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Alcatraz: The Scapegoat
0 expansion(s).

Alcatraz: The Scapegoat is a game about conflicted loyalties. On one hand, the players work together to bust out of the famous prison; on the other hand they all know that one of them will be left behind as the scapegoat. Alcatraz is a peculiar game because while it is cooperative in some aspects, with players needing to work together to complete tasks, the game has loads of negative interaction as one player will always be the scapegoat. You don't want to be that guy. You don't "go all in," you don't always keep your promises, and you don't do "what's best for the group." Instead, you do everything you can to become indispensable, and "everything" is literal here – even if it means stealing from, betraying, and blackmailing other players. In order to escape from Alcatraz, the players need to complete six parts of a plan. Each part is a "pick-up and deliver" task requiring specific items obtained in different parts of the prison. Once each part of the plan is completed, every player but the scapegoat moves a little closer to escaping, with the scapegoat being voted on each round by all the players – most likely the player who contributed the least to completing that particular task, but you never know. Thus, you could say that Alcatraz is a cooperative game – but with a twist. The map of the prison constituting the play area is generated randomly each game, providing high replayability. Alcatraz is designed for 3-4 players, and due to its theme and complex gameplay is best suited for mature players.

Expansions


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Alchemists
0 expansion(s).

In Alchemists, two to four budding alchemists compete to discover the secrets of their mystical art. Points can be earned in various ways, but most points are earned by publishing theories – correct theories, that is — and therein lies the problem. The game is played in six rounds. At the beginning of the round, players choose their play order. Those who choose to play later get more rewards. Players declare all their actions by placing cubes on the various action spaces, then each action space is evaluated in order. Players gain knowledge by mixing ingredients and testing the results using a smartphone app (iOS, Android, and also Windows) that randomizes the rules of alchemy for each new game. And if the alchemists are longing for something even more special, they can always buy magical artifacts to get an extra push. There are 9 of them (different for each game) and they are not only very powerful, but also very expensive. But money means nothing, when there's academic pride at stake! And the possession of these artifacts will definitely earn you some reputation too. Players can also earn money by selling potions of questionable quality to adventurers, but money is just a means to an end. The alchemists don't want riches, after all. They want respect, and respect usually comes from publishing theories. During play, players' reputations will go up and down. After six rounds and a final exhibition, reputation will be converted into points. Points will also be scored for artifacts and grants. Then the secrets of alchemy are revealed and players score points or lose points based on whether their theories were correct. Whoever has the most points at the end of the game wins. Flavor text: Mandrake root and scorpion tail; spongy mushroom and warty toad — these are the foundations of the alchemist's livelihood, science, and art. But what arcane secrets do these strange ingredients hide? Now it is time to find out. Mix them into potions and drink them to determine their effects — or play it safe and test the concoction on a helpful assistant! Gain riches selling potions to wandering adventurers and invest these riches in powerful artifacts. As your knowledge grows, so will your reputation, as you publish your theories for all to see. Knowledge, wealth, and fame can all be found in the murky depths of the alchemist's cauldron.

Expansions


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Alea Iacta Est
0 expansion(s).

Alea Iacta Est is a strategic historical wargame for two players. It narrates the civil wars that tore the late Roman Republic to shreds and paved the way for the establishment of the Principate. The period covered extends from Caesar’s crossing of the Rubicon with soldiers of the XIII Legion (12 January, 49 B.C.) to Octavianus’ closing of the doors of the Temple of Janus (11 January, 29 B.C.), the act that symbolized the return of peace. One player defends the interests of Caesar, his allies, his partisans and his successors. The other defends the interests of his adversaries. The roles of the two players may be reversed during the game. The rules of Alea Iacta Est constitute an evolution for a different epoch of the game system developed for Imperator (VaeVictis #42), Semper Victor (VaeVictis #56) and Ultimus Romanorum (VaeVictis #74). These games, though similar, cannot be played using the rules from another game in the series. The Game includes: an A1 map 216 die-cut counters one rulebook with 7 scenarios (20 pages) - in English OR French

Expansions


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Alhambra
0 expansion(s).

Granada, 1278. At the foot of the Sierra Nevada mountains, one of the most exciting and interesting project of the Spanish Middle Ages begins: the construction of the ALHAMBRA. The best master builders in the whole of Europe and Arabia want to demonstrate their skill. Employ the most suitable teams of builders and make sure that you always have enough of the right currency. Because no matter whether they are stonemasons from the north or horticulturalists from the south, they all want a proper wage and insist on their "native" currency. With their help towers can be constructed, gardens laid out, pavilions and arcades erected and seraglios and chambers built. In Alhambra, players are acquiring buildings to be placed within their Alhambra complex. The money in Alhambra comes in four different currencies and is available in the open money market. The 54 buildings of six types become available for purchase in the building market four at a time; one building is available in each of the four different currencies. On a player's turn, a player may 1) take money from the open money market, 2) purchase a building from the building market and either place it in his Alhambra or reserve, or 3) engage in construction and re-construction projects with buildings that have been placed in the player's Alhambra or reserve. The game rewards efficiency, as when a player purchases a building from the market for the exact amount of money, the player may take another turn. Players with the most buildings in each of the six building types in his Alhambra score in each of the scoring phases, and points are awarded for players' longest external "wall" section within their complex. The game ends when the building market can no longer be replenished from the building tile supply, and there is a final scoring, whereupon the player with the highest score wins. Integrates with: Alhambra: The Dice Game (a variant in which you can combine Alhambra buildings with Alhambra dice.)

Expansions


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Alien Frontiers
0 expansion(s).

Do you have what it takes to be a deep space colonist? An alien frontier awaits the brave and daring! This new planet will be harsh, but if you have the skills to manage your resources, build a fleet, research alien life, and settle colonies, the world can be yours. Alien Frontiers is a game of resource management and planetary development for two to four players. During the game you will utilize orbital facilities and alien technology to build colony domes in strategic locations to control the newly discovered world. The game board shows the planet, its moon, the stations in orbit around the planet, and the solar system’s star. The dice you are given at the start of the game represent the space ships in your fleet. You will assign these ships to the orbital facilities in order to earn resources, expand your fleet, and colonize the planet. As the game progresses, you will place your colony tokens on the planet to represent the amount of control you have over each territory. Those territories exert influence over specific orbital facilities and, if you control a territory, you are able to utilize that sway to your advantage. The planet was once the home of an alien race and they left behind a wondrous artifact in orbit. Using your fleet to explore the artifact, you will discover amazing alien technologies that you can use to advance your cause. Winning the game will require careful consideration as you assign your fleet, integrate the alien technology and territory influences into your expansion plans, and block your opponents from building colonies of their own. Do you have what it takes to conquer an alien frontier? Roll and place your dice to gain advantages over your opponent and block them out of useful areas of the board. Use Alien Tech cards to manipulate your dice rolls and territory bonuses to break the rules. Steal resources, overtake territories, and do whatever it takes to get your colonies on the map first! Don't dream it'll be easy, though, because the other players will be trying to do the same thing.

Expansions


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Among the Stars
0 expansion(s).

Among the Stars takes place in a war-ravaged galaxy where the warring alien races have declared peace in the wake of a threat with the potential to destroy them all. An Alliance is established to build space stations throughout the galaxy in order to promote trade among the races, strengthen diplomatic relations, and defend against this impending threat. Each player takes the role of one of those races trying to build the greatest space station. Through card drafting, the players select locations, and use these to build their station, scoring victory points based on the placement. The construction lasts four years, and the alien race with the most points at the end wins.

Expansions


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Amun-Re
0 expansion(s).

Everyone knows of the pyramids on the Nile - eternal monuments of a powerful and beautiful culture, that can still take our breath away. The pharaohs choose their sites, build their pyramids, and thank Amun Re and the other Gods for their bounty. Each player wants, as pharaoh, to build the most pyramids. To accomplish this, he must first acquire a province, where he can trade and farm. With his profits, he can buy new provinces and building stones to erect pyramids. For all his actions, the player must make clever use of his power cards, and always offer appropriate sacrifices to Amun Re. Players must always keep their eyes on the goal of the building of the eternal pyramids or risk falling behind in points.

Expansions


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Amyitis
0 expansion(s).

In Amyitis the players are rival architects competing to earn the most prestige building one of the seven wonders of the ancient world: the Hanging Gardens of Babylon. The game is named after the daughter (or granddaughter) of Cyaxares, the king of the Medes, who married King Nebuchadnezzar II, ruler of Babylon. The myth says that Amytis' homesickness for the forested mountains of the Median Empire led to the construction of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, as Nebuchadnezzar attempted to please her by planting the trees and plants of her homeland. The players embody noble Babylonians in quest of prestige. All along the game, they strive to raise their status by building gardens and their irrigation network, and by trading and recruiting. At the end of the game, the player with the highest prestige is the winner. In this game the players compete to build gardens, acquire plants, hire craftsmen, build irrigation and trade with ancient cities. Points can also be gained from building your palace and controlling the temples. On a turn the players chose one of the following actions: a) Recruit a craftsman, that grants an action (priest on temple, resource, irrigation or camel) b) Move the caravan (to purchase plant or court card or trade) c) Pass to potentially gain income. It is an interactive game where a player's actions directly affect the other players.

Expansions


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Anachrony
0 expansion(s).

It is the late 26th century. Earth is recovering from a catastrophic explosion that exterminated the majority of the population centuries ago and made most of the surface uninhabitable due to unearthly weather conditions. The surviving humans organized along four radically different ideologies, called Paths, to rebuild the world as they see fit: Harmony, Dominance, Progress, and Salvation. Followers of the four Paths live in a fragile peace, but in almost complete isolation next to each other. Their only meeting point is the last major city on Earth, now just known as the Capital. By powering up the mysterious Time Rifts that opened in the wake of the cataclysm, each Path is able to reach back to specific moments in their past. Doing so can greatly speed up their progress, but too much meddling may endanger the time-space continuum. But progress is more important than ever before: if the mysterious message arriving through the Time Rift is to be believed, an even more terrible cataclysm is looming on the horizon: an asteroid bearing the mysterious substance called Neutronium is heading towards Earth. Even stranger, the scientists show that the energy signature of the asteroid matches the explosion centuries ago... Anachrony features a unique two-tiered worker placement system. To travel to the Capital or venture out to the devastated areas for resources, players need not only various Specialists (Engineers, Scientists, Administrators, and Geniuses) but also Exosuits to protect and enhance them — and both are in short supply. The game is played in 4-7 turns, depending on the time when the looming cataclysm occurs (unless, of course, it is averted!). The elapsed turns are measured on a dynamic Timeline. By powering up the Time Rifts, players can reach back to earlier turns to supply their past "self" with resources. Each Path has a vastly different objective that rewards it with a massive amount of Victory Points when achieved. The Paths' settlements will survive the impact, but the Capital will not. Whichever Path manages to collect most points will be the new seat for the Capital, thus the most important force left on the planet...

Expansions


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Android: Infiltration
0 expansion(s).

It is the future, and beneath the flickering glow of the sprawling New Angeles skyline, immense corporations seek every advantage in the burgeoning field of synthetic humanoid technology. On the brink of a revolutionary innovation, CyberSolutions Inc. is poised to become the next global powerhouse, threatening the profits of well-established conglomerates Haas-Bioroid and Jinteki – but unfortunately for CyberSolutions, security at their New Angeles branch has just been compromised. Set in the dystopian future of Android, Infiltration is a tense card game of futuristic larceny in which two to six players take the roles of thieves, competing to steal valuable secrets from a highly secured corporate facility. The most vital information lies deep within the complex, but each step inward takes you farther from escape. Worse yet, corporate mercenaries are closing in! How long will you push your luck as you avoid security patrols, surpass rival thieves, and try to download the most data before the building is locked down? Game description above from the publisher The layout of the complex is different every game, choosing 6 of the possible 18 first floor cards, 6 of the 18 second floor cards, and 1 of the 3 secret room cards. These rooms are revealed to the players over the course of the game, usually by one of the players entering the room. The rooms contain traps, NPCs, valuable data and items, and even secret exits. Each turn, players secretly choose actions they will take, then in turn reveal and resolve their actions. Advancing into the complex or retreating towards the exit, downloading valuable data, interfacing with the current room, or using an item are the actions available to players. After the players have had their turn, any active NPCs have a turn, then the proximity dial is increased. Once the dial reaches 99, or all players have left the complex, the game ends. The players who have escaped the complex add up the value of the data they have extracted; the highest value wins!

Expansions


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Android: Netrunner
18 expansion(s).

Game description from the publisher Welcome to New Angeles, home of the Beanstalk. From our branch offices in this monument of human achievement, NBN proudly broadcasts all your favorite media programming. We offer fully comprehensive streaming in music and threedee, news and sitcoms, classic movies and sensies. We cover it all. Ours is a brave new age, and as humanity hurtles into space and the future with an astonishing series of new advances every day, NBN and our affiliates are keeping pace, bringing you all the vid that's fit to view. Android: Netrunner is an asymmetrical Living Card Game for two players. Set in the cyberpunk future of Android and Infiltration, the game pits a megacorporation and its massive resources against the subversive talents of lone runners. Corporations seek to score agendas by advancing them. Doing so takes time and credits. To buy the time and earn the credits they need, they must secure their servers and data forts with "ice". These security programs come in different varieties, from simple barriers, to code gates and aggressive sentries. They serve as the corporation's virtual eyes, ears, and machine guns on the sprawling information superhighways of the network. In turn, runners need to spend their time and credits acquiring a sufficient wealth of resources, purchasing the necessary hardware, and developing suitably powerful ice-breaker programs to hack past corporate security measures. Their jobs are always a little desperate, driven by tight timelines, and shrouded in mystery. When a runner jacks-in and starts a run at a corporate server, he risks having his best programs trashed or being caught by a trace program and left vulnerable to corporate countermeasures. It's not uncommon for an unprepared runner to fail to bypass a nasty sentry and suffer massive brain damage as a result. Even if a runner gets through a data fort's defenses, there's no telling what it holds. Sometimes, the runner finds something of value. Sometimes, the best he can do is work to trash whatever the corporation was developing. The first player to seven points wins the game, but not likely before he suffers some brain damage or bad publicity.

Expansions

  Android: Netrunner – What Lies Ahead

  Android: Netrunner – Trace Amount

  Android: Netrunner – Cyber Exodus

  Android: Netrunner – A Study in Static

  Android: Netrunner – Humanity's Shadow

  Android: Netrunner – Future Proof

  Android: Netrunner – Creation and Control

  Android: Netrunner – Opening Moves

  Android: Netrunner – Second Thoughts

  Android: Netrunner – Mala Tempora

  Android: Netrunner – True Colors

  Android: Netrunner – Fear and Loathing

  Android: Netrunner – Double Time

  Android: Netrunner – Honor and Profit

  Android: Netrunner – The Spaces Between

  Android: Netrunner – First Contact

  Android: Netrunner – The Source

  Android: Netrunner – Order and Chaos


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Antarctica
0 expansion(s).

In a distant time – so far in the future that either global warming or technical progress is so advanced that windmills are going swimmingly in the antarctic climate – the rising sea level and increased resource consumption has driven mankind to increase investment in polar research. The Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research sees an increasingly creative interpretation of the Antarctic Treaty System. Your objective in Antarctica is to develop research centers in Antarctica and to mine resources – for research purposes only, of course. The sun orbits Antarctica counter-clockwise, and each ship it thaws moves on for scientific progress. At the end of the game, victory points for all kinds of majorities are granted. Will your consort be the one that gained a fortune ... er, has done most to rescue mankind? Turn order is determined by the sun. Whenever it shines on one of your ships, you may erect buildings, recruit new scientists, build more ships, or do scientific research. The game ends when all buildings have been erected, or when one player has placed his last scientist.

Expansions


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Antike II
0 expansion(s).

Antike II is a challenging strategy game about evolution and competition among ancient civilizations. Ancient nations create cities, build temples, sail the seas, and discover new principles of science and technology. Their legions and galleys open new settlements and defend their people against attacks from their enemies. Two scenarios can be chosen as the game board is two-sided. Every nation tries to win ancient kings, scholars, generals, citizens, and navigators for themselves. The nation that acquires a specified number (depending on the number of players) of ancient personalities first wins the game! Lead one of these nations to victory—but watch out for your enemies as they will want to conquer your cities to destroy your temples. The game depends not on the luck of dice or cards, but on thoughtful plans and skillful diplomacy. Antike II differs from the 2005 Antike in several ways, according to designer Mac Gerdts. To start, players now own city tokens, which allows them some degree of choice as to which resource a newly founded city shall produce. Military units have become more expensive, and the rules for the conquest of cities are considerably easier. The scientific progresses were altered as well. Neutral temples now exist, which may be destroyed, gaining VPs of a general, without harming other players. The game features two new maps in a new graphical design, and a new card named "BELLONA" (the ancient Roman goddess of war) has been introduced to counter the starting player's advantage. Gerdts notes that the main goal of all of these changes was to make the rules for a conquest of cities easier, while also opening more possibilities to win the game without the need to attack other players.

Expansions


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Arboretum
0 expansion(s).

Arboretum is a strategy card game for 2-4 players, aged 10 and up, that combines set collection, tile-laying and hand management while playing in about 25 minutes. Players try to have the most points at the end of the game by creating beautiful garden paths for their visitors. The deck has 80 cards in ten different colors, with each color featuring a different species of tree; each color has cards numbered 1 through 8, and the number of colors used depends on the number of players. Players start with a hand of seven cards. On each turn, a player draws two cards (from the deck or one or more of the discard piles), lays a card on the table as part of her arboretum, then discards a card to her personal discard pile. When the deck is exhausted, players compare the cards that remain in their hands to determine who can score each color. For each color, the player with the highest value of cards in hand of that color scores for a path of trees in her arboretum that begins and ends with that color; a path is a orthogonally adjacent chain of cards with increasing values. For each card in a path that scores, the player earns one point; if the path consists solely of trees of the color being scored, the player scores two points per card. If a player doesn't have the most value for a color, she scores zero points for a path that begins and ends with that color. Whoever has the most points wins.

Expansions


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Arcane Legions
0 expansion(s).

Description: In the year 42BCE, a mysterious magical force was unleashed upon an unsuspecting world. The miasmic shockwave of pure otherworldly magic spread outward from a point somewhere in the middle east, and in a few short hours plunged the entire globe into chaos. In those terrible moments, human civilization changed forever. Magic infused their very bones, manifested in their children, came unbidden to the fingertips of their women, and plagued their countryside in uncontrolled bursts of power. Ordinary beasts of the wilderness were turned by these bursts into fanciful creatures of legend. Entire tribes of humans from all corners of the world were altered by the flood of uncontrolled magic, changing before the very eyes of their friends and neighbors into elves, dwarves, orcs, trolls, centaurs, and even minotaurs. Creatures that normally existed between our reality and others were shunted into this one, leaving ghosts, faeries, and other magical creatures stranded in our world in ways they were never intended to be. Even remnants of the Old World, gods of the ancients and their ken, were awakened from their immortal slumber through this great cataclysm to trouble mankind once more. The world had changed forever. The year is now 37BCE and the middle-east sits at the center of a vast struggle to control humanity’s fate. Three powerful nations have harnessed the power unleashed by the day of chaos, and they struggle to claim dominance over the known world. Their arcane legions are now yours to control. Gameplay: If you ever wondered what happened to the guys from WizKids just take a look at this game and you will know what they have been doing with the downtime after WizKids closed their doors. Players each field "bases" of variable sizes (Sortie/small and Formation/large) with individual figures inserted into starting positions on the base. The goal is to control victory point areas and inflict losses on the opponent. Movement and battle resolution are conducted through a unique formation management mechanic that allows players to move figures around on the unit bases to increase either movement/melee/ranged combat at the cost of losing capabilities in the other areas. Currently wrapping up play-testing as of May 2009. Arcane Legions will be available in September of 2009. Initially, look for 3 different factions (Egyptians, Romans, and Han Dynasty). Figures are highly detailed true 25mm made from PVC 105. Common figures are unpainted with colored tempo prints on banners and shields, while all the uncommon, rare and Commander figures (Booster Pack contents) are fully pre-painted. The game is designed to use both types. There are 9 different unpainted common figures for each faction and at least 20 different fully painted premium figures for each faction. If you buy a legion bundle of a faction you receive around 70 prepainted figures, whereas buying one of each army pack gets you about 54 unpainted figures. With more than 110 figures, the Starter Pack includes small armies for all three factions and enough formation bases, sortie bases and base cards for a complete two player game. The Army Packs contain 40 common soldiers. The Cavalry Packs contain 15 mounted figures. The Booster Packs contain 5-10 (depending on the size) Leader / special figures and their associated base cards, plus five additional formation base cards for use with figures from the Army and Cavalry Packs. All Arcane Legions products (with the exception of the Starter) can be purchased faction specific.

Expansions


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Archipelago
2 expansion(s).

In Archipelago, players are Renaissance European powers competing in the exploration of a Pacific or Caribbean archipelago. They will explore territories, harvest resources, use those resources in markets both internal (for their use and that of the natives) and foreign (to sell it in Europe), build markets, harbors, cities and temples, and negotiate among themselves (and maybe betray each other) – all this to complete their secret objectives. They will also need to guess the secret objective of the other players to be able to benefit from them. But players also need to be careful of the natives; if they make them too unhappy or if too many of them are unoccupied, they could revolt and declare independence. Then everyone will lose! According to the author, what he's tried to create is a "German" economic worker-placement game, but without the two things he dislikes in them: the superficial theme and the lack of interaction. Indeed this game includes a very present theme and a lot of negotiation and potential backstabbing. The game includes three sets of objectives, enabling players to choose between a short, medium and a long game. Solo play is also possible with an expansion. IN FRENCH Archipelago retrace l’ère majestueuse de la découverte des archipels à travers le globe de 1492 (découverte des Antilles par Christophe Colomb) jusqu’à 1797 (colonisation de Tahiti). Chaque joueur incarne un explorateur et son équipe, mandatés par une nation européenne pour découvrir, coloniser et exploiter les archipels. Ces missions sont censées s’effectuer de manière diplomatique, en répondant tant aux besoins de la population locale qu’aux demandes régulières du continent. Il faudra donc respecter l’archipel et ses autochtones sous peine de voir les natifs se révolter pour finir en guerre d’indépendance. Les limites entre expansionnisme et humanisme, économie et respect des valeurs locales, transmission de connaissances et industrialisation à outrance, ne sont pas toujours évidentes à trouver. L’équilibre de l’archipel dépendra donc beaucoup de la volonté que mettra chacun à faire de ces îles des colonies heureuses et productives, ou au contraire, à exploiter outrageusement les ressources et les natifs pour finir dans le chaos et la révolte. Pour compliquer les choses, parmi vous se cache peut-être un indépendantiste ou un pacifiste. L’un comme l’autre tentera de faire pencher la balance respectivement vers la révolte ou vers la paix. Êtes-vous prêt à endosser votre rôle et partir à la découverte d’Archipelago ?

Expansions

  Archipelago: Solo Expansion

  Archipelago: War & Peace


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Arctic Scavengers
1 expansion(s).

In the year 2097, the entire Earth was enveloped in a cataclysmic shift in climate, plunging the globe into another ice age. Nearly 90% of the world’s population was eliminated, driving the survivors to band together into loose communities and tribes. In Arctic Scavengers, you are the leader of a small tribe of survivors. Resources, tools, medicine, and mercenaries are all in scarce supply. You and your tribe are pitted against up to four other tribes in a fight for survival. Build up your tribe, skirmish against other players head-to-head, or even bluff your way to victory. The player with the largest tribe at the end of the game is declared the winner!

Expansions

  Arctic Scavengers: HQ


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Arkham Horror
0 expansion(s).

Arkham Horror is a cooperative adventure game themed around H.P Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos. The game has players exploring the town of Arkham as they attempt to stop unmentionable horrors from spilling into the world. It's possible for everyone to go insane and lose in this game. Re-implemented in: Arkham Horror (2005)

Expansions


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Arkham Horror: The Card Game
0 expansion(s).

Description from the publisher: Something evil stirs in Arkham, and only you can stop it. Blurring the traditional lines between roleplaying and card game experiences, Arkham Horror: The Card Game is a Living Card Game of Lovecraftian mystery, monsters, and madness! In the game, you and your friend (or up to three friends with two Core Sets) become characters within the quiet New England town of Arkham. You have your talents, sure, but you also have your flaws. Perhaps you've dabbled a little too much in the writings of the Necronomicon, and its words continue to haunt you. Perhaps you feel compelled to cover up any signs of otherworldly evils, hampering your own investigations in order to protect the quiet confidence of the greater population. Perhaps you'll be scarred by your encounters with a ghoulish cult. No matter what compels you, no matter what haunts you, you'll find both your strengths and weaknesses reflected in your custom deck of cards, and these cards will be your resources as you work with your friends to unravel the world's most terrifying mysteries. Each of your adventures in Arkham Horror LCG carries you deeper into mystery. You'll find cultists and foul rituals. You'll find haunted houses and strange creatures. And you may find signs of the Ancient Ones straining against the barriers to our world... The basic mode of play in Arkham LCG is not the adventure, but the campaign. You might be scarred by your adventures, your sanity may be strained, and you may alter Arkham's landscape, burning buildings to the ground. All your choices and actions have consequences that reach far beyond the immediate resolution of the scenario at hand — and your actions may earn you valuable experience with which you can better prepare yourself for the adventures that still lie before you.

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Arlequin
0 expansion(s).

In Arlequin, each player in turn, draw 2 to 5 cards and announces a combination of cards to his neighbor who accepts or checks this combination. If he accepts, he must himself annouces a greater combination of cards. If he checks, and the annonced combination is a bluff, the player how bluff will loses points,... but if that was not a bluff the player who check loses points instead.

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Artificium
0 expansion(s).

As a medieval ruler your aim is to develop crafts, build efficient production chains, and make your city thrive. Produce, transform, gather resources, and don't forget to hinder your opponents! Artificium is a card-driven development game. Some cards produce resources or transform one type of resources into another and award victory points, while others let you perform actions. Carefully planning the chain of cards that you will play during the game turn is the key to success. Artificium lasts four turns. At the start of each turn, players have five cards in hand, with six cards being face-up on the table as a card market. During the turn, players first have a chance to exchange some cards from their hands with those in the market, then they play and resolve their cards step by step, performing actions, trading and gathering resources, and most importantly, refining certain resources into other resources to earn victory points. Crystals on the players' individual resource boards keep track of their resources as they are bought and sold. Crystals placed beside the board represent player's coins. The final score is determined after the fourth turn, with players selling any remaining resources to score additional victory points (one point per four coins). The player with the most victory points is considered to be the wisest medieval ruler and is declared the winner.

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Ascension: Storm of Souls
0 expansion(s).

Samael is dead, but a storm is still raging across Vigil. Ascension: Storm of Souls takes players into the chaos following the Fallen One's demise. As Samael's monsters run wild and his minions conspire, the world is being slowly overtaken with souls that should have moved on. Are you ready for the new challenges that Vigil's future holds? Ascension: Storm of Souls is the first full-sized expansion for the hit deck-building game from Gary Games. The 200-card set features tons of new cards and mechanisms, in addition to a new Event card type. This is a complete game for 1-4 players that's playable on its own or in combination with other Ascension games. Combine this with other Ascension games to play with up to six players!

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Assyria
0 expansion(s).

In Assyria, players represent tribes living in Mesopotamia, trying to develop on the desert and a limted fertile area located between two rivers that divide the board. In their quest for power (points), players build Ziggurats (permanent outposts), wells, make sacrifices to gods and try to get along with nobles of Assur - the capital of Assyria. The game is a light-weight eurogame, built around the short-term rapid point gains vs long-term investments dilemma. General flow of play is as follows: Phase 1: Players get resources for expansion and decide on play order In this phase, players pick cards with resources that enable expansion on the board. In general he/she who gets most food, plays last. First player expands with least food. Phase 2: Players expand on the board to earn points or money. Players begin to form strings and/or clusters of huts and pay for placing them with their food cards. Depending on where huts are placed, they either score points or earn camels (money). Phase 3: Players spend money/camels on various investments. A player either goes for one-time bonuses from the nobles of Assur, or makes long-term investments by offerings to gods and building Ziggurats. The game lasts for three eras, made up of 2-3 of such cycles. After each era comes the flood: the board is partially cleaned up, but players also capitalize on their investments from phase 3. Each round, players also score points for huts (those built on fertile land between the two rivers bring more points) and ziggurat tiles. In comparison to other games from Ystari's series - Assyria is lighter than Caylus, Olympos, Ys or Sylla (in terms of complexity, available choices - represented by numerous tiles, cards, icons, cards etc. that need to be remembered and can be combined during play), but heavier than Yspahan, Mykerinos or Metropolis.

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Asteroyds
0 expansion(s).

Asteroyds is a racing and pre-program game similar to RoboRally but with enough significant differences to make it stand out as its own design. Each player takes on the role of a famous Shuttle Racer Pilot and they have been drawn to a deadly event put on by a mega-rich entrepreneur that has recently bought the Ujitos system. The aim of Asteroyds is to navigate the highly dangerous asteroid field and pass through four gates. What sets the game apart from other games of this design is that almost everything in the race zone can move position, so the players need to plan with that in mind. So each round begins with the rolling of three dice; red, white and blue. These relate to coloured asteroids of the matching colour and each rock has a set of numbers from 1-6 printed on them. This gives every pilot the information they need to know where each object will most likely move to (the value rolled for each dice determines which direction the object moves in) using the hex based board. The trick is that some objects move a differing number of spaces and objects react differently when collisions occur, thus a player's best laid plans may not pan out due to mistakes. Mistakes introduces the other unique aspect of Asteroyds. The players only get a given amount of time to work out their best flight path and then plan their moves on their planning board. A minute is recommended and 30 seconds for experts. This real-time tension in the planning is tense and helps the game to stick to a good play length. Asteroyds also offers advanced rules such as shooting, special pilot powers and also varied play modes such as; Shooting, Targets and drones. Some of these allow for team play.

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Atlanteon
0 expansion(s).

The original edition, titled Revolution, is set in French Revolution-era Paris. Royalists and Jacobins fight for superiority in the 25 city districts, which are represented by the game board. The two players alternately place one of their counters in order to control that space. When a player puts one of his number counters on the board, he projects influence onto the neighboring spaces in that row and column, and onto the space the counter itself is on. The amount of the influence corresponds to the number on the counter. Whoever controls all three of the buildings or controls eleven city districts has won the game. The game was later reprinted as Atlanteon, in which mighty undersea warriors fight to control the capital of the Sunken Kingdoms. One player controls the vicious Marauders, who are trying to capture the city, while the other player controls the heroic Guardians, who are trying to defend their home.

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Ave Tenebrae
0 expansion(s).

This is a French fantasy game. Ave Tenebrae makes it possible to simulate great fantastic medieval battles with many creatures and all types of magic. The rules are simple which encourages players to invent and adapt their own rules to the game. 5 scenarios are available in the rulebook. Main contents: - colour map 65 cm x 85 cm - 4 countersheets (200 counters on each) - 16 pages rulebook (in French only) - 2 player aids (en français, du dos de la boîte:) Les sombres hordes d'un Mage malfaisant déferlent sur l'Empire, entraînant dans une impitoyable guerre trois royaumes mineurs et leurs courageuses légions. Des dragons furieux dansent une farandole de mort avec des élémentaires d'air et de feu au dessus des féroces combats qui entremêlent des mort-vivants, des orques, des elfes, des démons: des paladins et d'autres mythiques créatures issues de la plus pure tradition du Fantastique Médiéval. La magie est omniprésente et de puissants sortilèges modifient sans cesse le fragile équilibre des Forces. Nouvelle version, entièrement refondue, du premier jeu français de simulation fantastique, AVE TENEBRAE va vous entraîner au cœur même des plus épiques affrontements. Si les cinq scénarios que contient la boîte ne suffisent pas à assouvir votre soif de puissance, vous pourrez aisément créer vos propres batailles grâce à un astucieux système de points d'achats c on c us pour vous permettre de créer vos propres armées et de construire les meilleures fortifications pour endiguer le déferlement de vos ennemis. Vous pourrez même résoudre, grâce à la surprenante adaptabilité des règles et au matériel contenu dans la boîte, les batailles de jeu de rôle que vous n'osiez pas mettre en scène, craignant la complexité qu'elles impliquent ordinairement. De nombreuses classes de personnages, un livret complet de sortilèges puissants et variés, une feuille de personnages pour personnaliser vos leaders, une feuille d'hexagones vierge et 800 pions, tout a été conçus pour vous ouvrir les plus larges horizons et pour varier à l'infini la création de situations pleines de suspens. Alors, que vous soyez wargamer acharné, joueur de jeu de rôle averti ou tout simplement amateur de bons jeux, vous ne pourrez pas vous refuser le plaisir de joueur à AVE TENEBRAE. Contenu de la boîte : - une carte en couleurs de 65 cm x 85 cm - 4 planches de 200 pions - 1 livret de règles de 16 pages - 2 cartons mémento pour les joueurs - 1 boîte à casiers avec couvercle plastique - 1 feuille d'hexagone vierge Nombre de joueurs : 2 à 4 Durée d'une partie : 1 heure et plus

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Axis & Allies: 1942
0 expansion(s).

Game description from the publisher: It's Spring 1942, and the world is at war. Five major powers struggle for supremacy: Germany and Japan are aligned against the great alliance of the United Kingdom, the Soviet Union, and the United States. Designed for 2–5 players, Axis & Allies: 1942 takes place at the historical high-water mark of Axis expansion. Controlling one of the Axis or Allied powers, players command both their country's military forces and its war-time economy, with the chance to plan attacks, marshal forces into embattled territories, and resolve conflicts. Victory will go to the side that conquers its opponents on the field of battle and liberates or occupies the greatest cities of the world. Change the course of history in a few short hours! ••• The second edition of Axis & Allies: 1942 features an expanded game board (40"x26"), a change to the unit set-up, five new sculpts (UK artillery, submarine & destroyer units; German artillery; a Russian submarine; and antiaircraft artillery), and a few rules changes, e.g., AA-Guns have been replaced by AAA Guns, ICs have integrated air defense against strategic bombing raids, and Honolulu is now a victory city.

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AYA
1 user(s) want(s) to play.
0 expansion(s).

Welcome to the world of Aya, the goddess of water. You will embark on a journey up the river to seek out nature's treasures and marvel at the variety of landscapes and animals that emerge as you glide along. Be clever and cooperate for the best photos so that you can share your incredible journey! Create and discover a new world each time you play with family and friends. In Aya, you have to cooperate to connect as many landscape tiles and animal photo tokens as possible to arrange a chain of dominoes placed upright one after another. At the end of the game, they will fall onto each other, each one toppling the next – in a cascade effect – to reveal the ultimate number of landscapes and animals and bring back the greatest photos. Working as a team, the players try to score as many points as possible.

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Aye, Dark Overlord! The Red Box
0 expansion(s).

Aye, Dark Overlord! is a fantasy party game filled with humor that's fast to play and easy to learn. Each player is an evil goblin servant of the evil Dark Overlord — Rigor Mortis, the Master of all Evils — and all of them are gathered at the Dark Overlord's knees to explain why they brought that last important mission, ordered by "His Evil Excellence" himself, to failure again. Panic wraps you in its freezing grip; what can you do to save your poor skin? Could you say you are not the one to blame, but your inept companions? Yes, of course, that's the solution! There is only one little problem: They've probably got exactly the same idea...and the Dark Overlord is not known for his mercy... This roleplaying game is all about telling lies and shifting the blame on your poor fellow ones, so the righteous wrath of your Master can give them what they deserve! Aye, Dark Overlord! The Red Box is the most recent name of this game, to distinguish it from The Green Box, which is both a standalone game and an expansion for this one.

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Azteca
0 expansion(s).

You are the emperor of one of four great fifteenth century peoples that resided in the valleys of Mexico - Aztecs, Toltecs, Chichimecs, or Tepanecs. Your goal is to appease the god of creation, Quetzalcoatl, before his enemy, the god of night, Tezcatlipoca destroys the universe. Players gather finances enabling them to plan battles, organize expeditions, forge alliances, build cities, and instigate revolts, all to gain sacrifice points for the gods. Have you adequately prepared for Quetzalcoatl's arrival? No one knows until the end!

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Babel
0 expansion(s).

In Babel, each player makes use of members of various tribes of the ancient world to build temples, exploit (or exterminate) their opponent's work force, destroy or steal their opponent's temples and otherwise do whatever it takes to build the tallest temples to win the game. The game plays out on a small game board representing regions of 5 ancient civilizations, Medes, Sumerians, Hittites, Persians, and Assyrians. Each player will be dealt a hand of cards (consisting of 5 types corresponding to the above tribes). Players themselves are represented by stone figures. Temple cards will be made available at the side of the board for building throughout the game. On his or her turn, a player may discard a card to move to the corresponding region, place a card on the region they are currently located, build a temple by having tribesmen equal to the number or level on the temple card AND having built the previous (lower) temple level, move tribesmen from one region to another, or perform a skill action unique to each tribe. Players may perform any and all actions available to them, being able to perform most actions as many times as they wish and saving any number of unplayed cards for subsequent turns. A big component of this game is placing your tribe cards in sets. Skills can only be used if a set of three (or more) cards is at the same location as the player marker. By discarding one of the cards of a set, the skill may be used. No matter the tribe, performing this action can force the opponent to discard half their hand. Other skills, such as robbing a temple from an opponent, skipping a level on a temple build, destroy an opposing temple, etc. are specific to the tribe activated. Game play progresses until one of two conditions is met: if a player builds 15 points (or levels) of temples before the opposing player builds at least 10 points, that player wins. If the opponent [i]does have[/i] more than 10 points, the game continues until one player reaches 20 points (in which case he or she wins) OR one player subsequently drops below 10 (in which case he or she loses).

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Backgammon
0 expansion(s).

Backgammon is a classic abstract strategy game dating back thousands of years. Each player has a set of 15 "men" that must be moved from their starting positions, around, and then off the board. Dice are thrown each turn, and each player must decide which of his men to move based on the outcome of the roll. Players can capture each other's men, forcing the captured men to restart their journey around the board. The winner is the first player to get all 15 men off the board. A more recent addition to the game is the "doubling cube", which allows players to up the stakes of the game, as it is often played for money. Although the game relies on dice to determine movement, there is a large degree of strategy in deciding how to make the most effective moves given each dice roll as well as measuring the risk in terms of possible rolls the opponent may get. Backgammon may be the first game to be mentioned in written history, going back 5,000 years to the Sumerians of ancient Mesopotamia. During the 1920's, archaeologists unearthed five boards from a cemetery in the ancient town of Ur. At another location, pieces and dice were also found along with the board. Boards from ancient Egypt have also been recovered from the tomb of Tutankhamun, including a mechanical dice box, no doubt intended to stop cheaters. The names of the game were many. In Persia, Takhteh Nard> which means "Battle on Wood". In Egypt, Tau, which may be the ancestor of Senat. In Rome, Ludus Duodecim Scriptorum ("game of twelve marks"), later, Tabula ("table"), and by the sixth century, Alea ("dice"). In ancient China, T-shu-p-u and later in Japan, Sugoroko. The English name may derive from "Bac gamen" meaning "Back Game", referring to re-entry of taken stones back to the board. It was often enjoyed by the upper classes and is sometimes called "The Aristocratic Game." The Roman Emperor Claudius was known to be such a fan that he had a set built into his coach so he could play as he traveled (the world's first travel edition?). The rules in English were standardized in 1743 by Edmond Hoyle. These remained popular until the American innovations of the 1930's.

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BANG!
0 expansion(s).

"The Outlaws hunt the Sheriff. The Sheriff hunts the Outlaws. The Renegade plots secretly, ready to take one side or the other. Bullets fly. Who among the gunmen is a Deputy, ready to sacrifice himself for the Sheriff? And who is a merciless Outlaw, willing to kill him? If you want to find out, just draw (your cards)!" (From back of box) The card game BANG! recreates an old-fashioned spaghetti western shoot-out, with each player randomly receiving a Character card to determine special abilities, and a secret Role card to determine their goal. Four different Roles are available, each with a unique victory condition: Sheriff - Kill all Outlaws and the Renegade Deputy - Protect the Sheriff and kill any Outlaws Outlaw - Kill the Sheriff Renegade - Be the last person standing A player's Role is kept secret, except for the Sheriff. Character cards are placed face up on table, and also track strength (hand limit) in addition to special ability. There are 22 different types of cards in the draw deck. Most common are the BANG! cards, which let you shoot at another player, assuming the target is within "range" of your current gun. The target player can play a "MISSED!" card to dodge the shot. Other cards can provide temporary boosts while in play (for example, different guns to improve your firing range) and special one-time effects to help you or hinder your opponents (such as Beer to restore health, or Barrels to hide behind during a shootout). A horse is useful for keeping your distance from unruly neighbors, while the Winchester can hit a target at range 5. The Gatling is a deadly exception where range doesn't matter: it can only be used once, but targets all other players at the table! Information on the cards is displayed using language-independent symbols, and 7 summary/reference cards are included.

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BANG! The Bullet!
0 expansion(s).

BANG! The Bullet! is the deluxe version of BANG! and its expansions. Coming in a deluxe bullet-'box' it contains: - BANG! - Third Edition with reworked cards and rules - Dodge City - Second Edition with reworked cards and characters - High Noon - Second Edition - High Noon II (A Fistful Of Cards) - Second Edition - Two new exclusive High Noon cards - "New Identity" and "Handcuffs" - Three new characters - Uncle Will, Johnny Kisch, and Claus "The Saint" - Two blank cards - One silver sheriff badge Released: Essen 2007. BANG! The Bullet 2nd Edition: - BANG! 4th edition (no player mats or bullet tokens) - Dodge City 3rd edition - High Noon 2nd Edition - A Fistful Of Cards 2nd Edition - Two Exclusive High Noon cards - "New Identity" and "Handcuffs" - Three new characters - Uncle Will, Johnny Kisch, and Claus "The Saint" - Two blank cards - One silver sheriff badge Reprinted in June 2009

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BANG! The Dice Game
0 expansion(s).

In the U.S. wild west, the eternal battle between the law and the outlaws keeps heating up. Suddenly, a rain of arrows darken the sky: It's an Indian attack! Are you bold enough to keep up with the Indians? Do you have the courage to challenge your fate? Can you expose and defeat the ruthless gunmen around you? BANG! The Dice Game keeps the core of the Bang! card game in place. At the start of the game, players each take a role card that secretly places them on a team: the Sheriff and deputies, outlaws, and renegades. The Sheriff and deputies need to kill the outlaws, the outlaws win by killing the Sheriff, and the renegades want to be the last players alive in the game. Each player also receives a character card which grants him a special power in the game. The Sheriff reveals his role card and takes the first turn of the game. On a turn, a player can roll the five dice up to three times, using the results of the dice to shoot neighboring players, increase the range of his shots, heal his (or anyone else's) life points, or put him in range of the Indians, which are represented by nine tokens in the center of the table. Each time a player rolls an arrow, he takes one of these tokens; when the final token is taken, each player loses one life point for each token he holds, then the tokens are returned to the center of the table. If a player collects a trio of Gatling symbols on the dice, he fires one shot at everyone else and rids himself of Indian tokens. Who'll get his shot off first? Play continues until one team meets its winning condition – and death won't necessarily keep you from winning as long as your teammates pull through!

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Barbarossa
0 expansion(s).

Barbarossa is set in a fictional Second World War setting in which cute German military girls rush against Moscow to defeat the evil magician Stalin. The game uses the in-game deck-building mechanism from Dominion – that is, each player starts with a small deck of resource cards and during the course of the game one buys cards from an open card pool to build a deck of cards to play with. Goal of the game is to conquer Moscow. If Moscow falls the player with the most victory points wins. Victory points are acquired by conquering different cities and/or strategical positions during the game. Every time you attack a city, event cards from an event deck are drawn (e.g. General "Winter"). Barbarossa uses six different kinds of cards: Supply Cards: These provide points to buy other cards from the open card pool. Unit Cards: The use of these cards require "Operation Points" (Each turn you start with one Operation Point) and deliver the military strength to attack cities or strategic positions (or in other words gain victory point cards). Operation Cards: They give you a one time bonus in different forms. After use they are not just discarded but put out of play. Deploy Cards: They stay in the players play area and deliver bonuses in different forms every turn. Target Cards: The cities and strategic positions which deliver VPs, also if you conquered strategic positions it becomes easier to attack cities. Event Cards: If you attack the Target cards an event is drawn and stuff happens. Like all of Arclight's deck construction games, the illustrations are provided by famous Japanese fanzine artists. Integrates with El Alamein

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Batman Miniature Game
0 expansion(s).

The Batman Miniature Game is a skirmish game based on the broad Batman universe. You can command one of the most famous criminal bands in Gotham City to expand your territory and control the underworld, or stop their evil plans with the Dark Knight and his allies. The game includes the most important characters created by Bob Kane, like Batman himself, Robin, Nightwing, etc. aided by the Gotham City Police trying to stop the gangs led by the most infamous criminals and psychopaths of the DC Comics universe, like The Joker, Penguin, Two-Face, the immortal Rahs al Goul and many others. Knight Models team has created incredible detailed miniatures to accurately portray these characters and their sidekicks in 35mm scale ready to assemble and paint. This is a licensed and official DC Comics product. The Batman Miniature Game is an innovative and original game system, easy to learn and has tactical deep, that features thrilling combats and frenzy action, where bands of 5 to 12 characters fight to achieve their objectives in games of 60 to 120 minutes duration.

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Batman: Gotham City Strategy Game
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Game description from the publisher: Behind the façade of the great Gotham City lies an active underworld of criminal activity. In Batman: Gotham City Strategy Game, you'll play as one of Gotham City's greatest villains – The Joker, The Penguin, Killer Croc, or Two-Face — and lead your gang of henchmen to try to become the King of Crime in Gotham City! But beware, as your hold on the city increases, so does the chance of your plans being foiled by Gotham's protector – Batman! During the game, players collect resources of information, money and threat; threat is used to exert your rule over blocks in Gotham City, and control of blocks allows you to collect income on these blocks of either information or money. Money is used for leveling and to hire henchmen who will help you rule city blocks and fight better against other villains and Batman. Information is used for leveling and moving your villain and henchmen through the city blocks. Leveling works as follows: Each villain has a combat dial with ten levels. Each click of the dial shows a requirement that you will need to advance to the next level: information, money, henchmen, or blocks controlled. The first player to reach level 10 with his villain wins. On every even number level, players will acquire special abilities unique to their villain. Each turn a player will play a Criminal Plot card which will either produce an income for the ruler of a certain block or trigger the Bat Signal, which calls in Batman! When Batman moves into a block with a Villain, a fight occurs using the two custom Batman dice included with the game. If Batman wins, the villain and his henchmen must flee to their hideout and Batman restores order in that block of Gotham City; if the villain wins, they have defeated Batman (for the time being) and Batman returns to the Batcave, increasing his combat effectiveness as he plans for the next encounter.

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Batman: The Animated Series – Almost Got 'Im Card Game
0 expansion(s).

The villains of Gotham City have gathered for a poker night and to share stories about the time they nearly dispensed with that troublesome caped crusader Batman. Little do they know that the Dark Knight is in their midst, disguised as one of their own. Will the rogues be able to suss out the bat in their belfry before he clandestinely subdues them? Batman: The Animated Series – Almost Got 'Im Card Game — a variant on the popular Werewolf-style deduction game inspired by the memorable Batman: The Animated Series episode "Almost Got 'Im" — adds a poker element to the proceedings, requiring participants to craft poker hands to activate their special abilities when the lights go out. Take on the personas of classic Batman baddies in a game in which everyone has something to hide and no one is safe. With poker hands guiding the action, players have something to talk about. Everyone has an important role. No bystanders in this game! Too often, social deduction games begin with random accusations just to get the ball rolling. Not so here as players can request poker cards from other players and often see which cards other players are taking. Enemies are made when someone takes the card you wanted. Now you have a reason to be suspicious of another player! Errata: The rulebook lists two Role Explanation Cards. There is only one. My mistake when I wrote the rules. ~MH

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Battle Line
0 expansion(s).

Two opponents face off across a 'battle line' and attempt to win the battle by taking 5 of 9 flags or 3 adjacent flags. Flags are decided by placing cards into 3 card poker-type hands on either side of the flag (similar to straight flush, 3 of a kind, straight, flush, etc). The side with the highest 'formation' of cards wins the flag. This is a rethemed version of Schotten Totten with different graphics and wooden flag bits in place of the boundary stone cards. Game play is identical, except the cards run from 1 to 10 (not 9), you hold seven cards in your hand (not 6), and the rule that stones may only be claimed at the start of your turn is presented as an "advanced variant". Also the tactics cards were introduced by Battle Line; these cards were only added to later editions of Schotten-Totten. Some have reported that the production quality of the cards is inferior to the Schotten Totten cards, however, for most readers Battle Line will be much easier to find in stores. In the second edition of GMT's Battle Line the card quality is higher.

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Battle Sheep
0 expansion(s).

In Battle Sheep (first released as Splits), players start the game by constructing the board from identical four-hex tiles, then each player places his/her tall stack of discs on one of the border hexes. Players take turns removing some number of discs from the top of one of their stacks, moving that new stack of discs as far away as it can go in a straight line. Players must leave at least one disc behind when moving, so the board gradually fills up and movement opportunities become more and more scarce. The player occupying the most spaces at the end of the game wins!

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BattleCON: Devastation of Indines
0 expansion(s).

As new villains appear to lay claim to the world of Indines, new heroes rise to challenge them. BattleCON: Devastation of Indines puts you in control of 30 mighty heroes and deadly villains to decide the fate of the world. BattleCON: Devastation of Indines is a standalone dueling card game designed for head-to-head and team play. Each player selects a character who uses a unique gameplay mechanism to give them an edge in combat. Take control of guitar-playing summoner, a pair of tag-teaming werewolves, a prodigal paladin, a genius artificer, and more! Each character's play style requires new strategies, but uses the same foundational tactics, making a new character easy to learn, but challenging to master. Players move along a seven-space-long board, trading blows and attempting to strike the opponent, using attacks formed by combining a character's unique styles and abilities with a set of basic cards that all characters share. The last player standing wins! BattleCON: Devastation of Indines can be played on its own or combined with BattleCON: War of Indines to create an even greater pool of characters and play variants. Included with the game: BattleQUEST Guide The BattleQUEST Dungeon Guide contains six adventures (3 solo and 3 cooperative) for players. Using BattleQUEST, players can play alone or cooperatively against automated enemies in an attempt to defeat the final boss and claim victory!

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BattleLore
1 expansion(s).

This game is based upon Richard Borg's Command and Colors system. The world of BattleLore meshes history and fantasy together - putting players in command of an array of miniature troops on the battlefields of a Medieval Europe Uchronia at the outset of the Hundred Years War. Drawing on the strengths of Memoir '44, this Days of Wonder game takes the time-tested Command and Colors system to a new level and offers gamers of many backgrounds a chance to fight medieval battles with a dose of epic fantasy. In this fantastical re-imagining of the Hundred Years War, French and English armies are supplemented with Goblins and Dwarves mercenaries and even some creatures like the Giant Spider and the Earth Elemental! Just as important as the armies you have, though, are the Lore Masters you choose to aid you: Wizards, Clerics, Warriors and Rogues can all aid you with unique powers and spells in ways role-playing gamers will find familiar.

Expansions

  BattleLore: Dragons


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BattleLore (Second Edition)
0 expansion(s).

Game description from the publisher: Prepare for fantasy battles beyond your wildest imagination with the onslaught of BattleLore Second Edition. Set in the fantasy realm of Terrinoth, BattleLore Second Edition is a two-player board game focused on squad-based battles between the hardy defenses of the Daqan Lords garrison in Nordgard Castle and the unleashed ferocity of the demon-worshipping Uthuk Y’llan. You must strategically command your troops and use the power of lore to tip your battles in your favor. In every game, you will create new maps and scenarios, before mustering a new army for each game, so you can tailor your army to suit your favored play style. Command armies of fearsome warriors and deadly creatures, and lead them against the enemy in this intense game of warfare and military strategy. By seizing victory points from objectives on the battlefield and by eliminating enemy units, a skilled commander can raise his banners as the victor over the borderlands of Terrinoth! BattleLore Second Edition comes with a game board, ninety-two detailed figures, forty-three map overlay pieces, more than one-hundred fifty cards, rules, four custom dice, and everything else you need to win the borderlands of Terrinoth!

Expansions


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Battles of Westeros
0 expansion(s).

Unfurl the banners of the Great Houses of Westeros! To secure power in the Seven Kingdoms and to ensure the survival of their lines, the Houses of Westeros each follow very different paths. Some forge strategic alliances, some create complex political intrigues, and still others use deceit and betrayal. But there is no more direct or lasting path to power than taking to the field of battle. In Battles of Westeros, two players recreate the military conflicts set in George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series, taking part in battles directly from the books... or designing their own. In this epic board game of battlefield tactics, players control either House Stark, the wards of Winterfell who have called their hearty allies to defend their honor and lands, or House Lannister, an aggressive force funded by Casterly Rock’s endless supply of gold. Battles of Westeros is played over one of several included scenarios, called battles. Each of these has a battle plan that dictates the formation of the map (called the battlefield), starting positions of each House’s units, starting resources, special rules, and victory conditions for the game session. A battle is played over several rounds, with each round consisting of alternating player turns. The goals a player needs to accomplish to win a game of Battles of Westeros can vary (some battles require players to earn a certain number of victory points, while other battles require a player to take and hold strategic positions on the battlefield), but this collection of available scenarios, along with the ability to make your own exciting battles with the double-sided map board and over thirty map overlays, gives Battles of Westeros a wealth of replayability! Battles of Westeros also offers plenty of strategic complexity, resulting in a satisfying number of compelling choices in every game. For example, each player has a special randomized Leadership Deck, consisting of unique tactics and abilities; this deck will change based on the scenario being played and characters present. Is Jaime Lannister on the battlefield? If you draw the appropriate Leadership Card, he can order nearby troops to aggressively rush their opponents! Is Eddard Stark guiding his forces into battle? Special flanking maneuvers enter your Leadership Deck, to potentially be drawn into your hand. Battles of Westeros also features a level of realism that immerses you in the most significant conflicts of the War of the Five Kings. Each plastic figure base, which holds your infantry, archer, cavalry, and kennelmaster units, has a slot for a banner pole – a small flag-bearing attachment. The plastic banners that attach to each unit bear the crest of that unit’s house, and their orientation on the pole indicates at a glance whether that unit has been ordered yet. In addition to the intuitive and useful game effect this provides (differentiating the units you’ve activated from those you haven’t), the sight of your army’s banners spread impressively across the gorgeously designed game board will give you the sense that you are the clever Tywin Lannister, Lord of Casterly Rock... or the stoic Robb Stark, with his direwolf Grey Wind at his side!

Expansions


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Battleship Galaxies
0 expansion(s).

Battleship Galaxies is a space combat miniatures game that is a distant cousin to the original Battleship game. The two opposing forces represented in the game, the human Intergalactic Space Navy and the alien Wretcheridians, are represented by 20 starship miniatures. There are figures for several different ship types and each has an individual reference card that defines the characteristics (e.g., weapons, movement, shields) of that ship. The game is scenario driven and each scenario defines the goal of the game as well as the initial setup of the starfield hex board. Each turn, players have a certain number of energy points that can be spent to perform actions such as movement or firing. Combat is resolved by rolling special dice: a 10-sided die with letters and an eight-sided die with numbers. The resulting letter-number combination is compared to the target ship’s reference card to determine the result. Hits on a ship are indicated by placing colored pegs in the figure’s base.

Expansions


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Battlestar Galactica
3 expansion(s).

Battlestar Galactica: The Board Game is an exciting game of mistrust, intrigue, and the struggle for survival. Based on the epic and widely-acclaimed Sci Fi Channel series, Battlestar Galactica: The Board Game puts players in the role of one of ten of their favorite characters from the show. Each playable character has their own abilities and weaknesses, and must all work together in order for humanity to have any hope of survival. However, one or more players in every game secretly side with the Cylons. Players must attempt to expose the traitor while fuel shortages, food contaminations, and political unrest threatens to tear the fleet apart. After the Cylon attack on the Colonies, the battered remnants of the human race are on the run, constantly searching for the next signpost on the road to Earth. They face the threat of Cylon attack from without, and treachery and crisis from within. Humanity must work together if they are to have any hope of survival…but how can they, when any of them may, in fact, be a Cylon agent? Battlestar Galactica: The Board Game is a semi-cooperative game for 3-6 players ages 10 and up that can be played in 2-3 hours. Players choose from pilots, political leaders, military leaders, or engineers to crew Galactica. They are also dealt a loyalty card at the start of the game to determine if they are a human or Cylon along with an assortment of skill cards based on their characters abilities. Players then can move and take actions either on Galactica, on Colonial 1, or in a Viper. They need to collect skill cards, fend off Cylon ships, and keep Galactica and the fleet jumping. Each turn also brings a Crisis Card, various tasks that players must overcome. Players need to play matching skill cards to fend off the problems; skill cards that don't match hinder the players success. Fate could be working against the crew, or there could be a traitorous Cylon! As players get closer and closer towards reaching their Earth, another round of loyalty cards are passed out and more Cylons may turn up. If players can keep their up their food stores, fuel levels, ship morale, and population, and they can keep Galactica in one piece long enough to make it to Earth, the Humans win the game. But if the Cylon players reveal themselves at the right moment and bring down Galactica, the Humans have lost. Official Site, Rules & FAQ: http://www.fantasyflightgames.com/edge_minisite_sec.asp?eidm=18&esem=4 Unofficial FAQ for really tricky questions: http://boardgamegeek.com/wiki/page/Battlestar_Galactica_FAQ

Expansions

  Battlestar Galactica: Pegasus Expansion

  Battlestar Galactica: Exodus Expansion

  Battlestar Galactica: Daybreak Expansion


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Beer & Pretzels
0 expansion(s).

In Beer & Pretzels, players throw coasters onto a table. And then they get money. And then they throw more coasters. And then they get more money. This very complex and detailed process repeats until the end of the game at which point the player with the most money wins, just like in real life. At that point the winner will claim that Beer & Pretzels is the best game ever, and the losers will claim that the game is fundamentally flawed, and most likely broken. Just by coincidence, each coaster has an image of either pretzels or beer on it. Different pretzels have different values. Beer doubles your money. Players only score for items that are completely visible... items entirely or partially obscured by other coasters don’t count. There tends to be name calling, bragging, self-high-fiving and the occasional brawl during the game, all of which add to the rich atmosphere and theme. WARNING: Beer & Pretzels should be played with caution. Unmitigated use of this game could result in anxiety, agitation, panic attacks, lapsing into inconsistent foreign accents, irritability, hostility, aggressiveness, double vision, drooling, impulsivity, restlessness, extreme hyperactivity, unusual changes in behavior, kidney problems, long term memory loss, narrow angle glaucoma, itching, right upper belly pain, insomnia, fever, an inability to line up buttons properly on dress shirts, dark urine, yellow skin/eyes, unexplained flu-like symptoms, anal leakage, dizziness, yodeling, hive clusters, nausea, fainting upon standing, stiff muscles, uncontrollable cravings for onion rings, confusion, severe liver problems, barking, high fever, increased frequency of toe stubbing, dry mouth, constipation, sudden uncontrollable left-handedness and decreased appetite. This is not a complete list of potential side effects. Ask your doctor if Beer & Pretzels is right for you.

Expansions


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Beer & Vikings
0 expansion(s).

A few viking warriors sit at a table in smoky long hall, talking and bragging about war axes, women and pillages. Beer flows freely, but not even the cellars of Byggvir, the God of Beer, could quench the thirst of Nordland's greatest warriors. Servants run for cover, knowing full well where all this is going. Suddenly an eerie silence fills the common room. On the table, only one full cup remains. Who will get the last drink? Not a single step back is allowed to the warrior who wishes to enter Valhalla. One single thought in everyone's mind: may Fenrir eat the sun, that beer will be mine! All vikings laugh at the thought of death, draw their war axes, joining the fight at the call of "OOOODIIIIIIIIIIN!" In Beer & Vikings you are a fierce and thirsty viking warrior, willing to do anything to get the last cup of beer. The winner is the most drunk viking – in game terms, the player who has collected the most beer drink counters – at the end of the sudden death round. Be wary, though, for drinking too much will dull your wits and mastery with the war axe. Each drink of beer prevents you from using one of your resources, be it a weapon, an item, or even your personal skill! You must always be wary not to drink too much or you risk becoming a defenseless sot in the hands of your enemies. On the other hand, you will be able to burn up some of the beer you have drunk to obtain significant bonuses which may well save your life. Show yourself as the wise warrior you are and balance your strategy with care, not burning up too much beer, thus finding yourself in the rear at the end of the game, when the cup is empty and the sudden death round begins. Those who will succumb to their enemies' blows won't be eliminated from the game, but will become Spirits of Loki, the thirsty god of evil, and team up with the other Spirits to attack the living, aiming to steal their beer. Raise your glasses (and your axes)! Beer & Vikings introduces 112 brand new cards! including a new type of cards called "Valhalla" which provide you a strong ability during the match – but to obtain them you need to kill an opponent. Thus, to gain this power you must generate a vengeful spirit first. Be careful when you follow the Valhalla way... Beer & Vikings, a board game for 3-8 players about war axes, blood and beer, is both a standalone game and an expansion for Sake & Samurai. Integrates with Sake & Samurai Microbadge:

Expansions


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Belle Alliance
0 expansion(s).

Description from the rulebook: This set of wargame rules for the Napoleonic period was developed through trial games during the years 1996-2000. A first edition was published under the working title Depression over the Hebrides.

Expansions


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Beowulf: The Legend
0 expansion(s).

(not to be confused with Knizia's Beowulf: The Movie Board Game) From FFG Spring 2005 Catalog: The fascinating legend of the great hero Beowulf is told in one of the oldest works of English literature. This game relives the legend of how the Geatish warrior Beowulf comes to the aid of the Danish King against the fearsome monster Grendel, how he returns to his home in Geatland to become King, and how Beowulf meets his end when fighting the terrible dragon. Beowulf the Legend, designed by renowned game designer Reiner Knizia, invites you to accompany the mighty hero as one of his brave comrades. Will you become the most renowned warrior and succeed Beowulf as king? Only the strongest will prevail! The game consists of a series of auctions depicting different events in the legend of Beowulf. Players "bid" in the auctions by offering up cards representing the skills they will offer to help Beowulf succeed (fighting, cunning, etc.) in an attempt to earn rewards of points or powerful cards, or to avoid injuries or other penalties. Players can also take a `Risk' and draw two cards from the deck to bid with. But if the cards don't match the current auction, the player is forced to drop out. Players need to carefully manage their hands and the timing of when they choose to take risks to increase their chances of winning.

Expansions


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Betrayal at House on the Hill
0 expansion(s).

From the press release: Betrayal at House on the Hill quickly builds suspense and excitement as players explore a haunted mansion of their own design, encountering spirits and frightening omens that foretell their fate. With an estimated one hour playing time, Betrayal at House on the Hill is ideal for parties, family gatherings or casual fun with friends. Betrayal at House on the Hill is a tile game that allows players to build their own haunted house room by room, tile by tile, creating a new thrilling game board every time. The game is designed for three to six people, each of whom plays one of six possible characters. Secretly, one of the characters betrays the rest of the party, and the innocent members of the party must defeat the traitor in their midst before it’s too late! Betrayal at House on the Hill will appeal to any game player who enjoys a fun, suspenseful, and strategic game. Betrayal at House on the Hill includes detailed game pieces, including character cards, pre-painted plastic figures, and special tokens, all of which help create a spooky atmosphere and streamline game play. An updated reprint of Betrayal at House on the Hill was released on October 5, 2010. An expansion 'Widows Walk' will be released Fall 2016. (http://avalonhill.wizards.com/games/widows-walk)

Expansions


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Between Two Cities
0 expansion(s).

It is the early 1800s, a time of immense construction and urbanization. You are a world-renowned master city planner who has been asked to redesign two different cities. Projects of such significance require the expertise of more than one person, so for each assignment you are paired with a partner with whom to discuss and execute your grandiose plans. Will your planning and collaborative skills be enough to design the most impressive city in the world? Between Two Cities is a partnership-driven tile-drafting game in which each tile represents part of a city: factory, shop, park, landmarks, etc. You work with the player on your left to design the heart of one city, and with the player on your right to design the heart of another city. On each turn you select two tiles from hand, reveal them, then work with your partners separately to place one of those tiles into each of your two cities before passing the remaining hand of tiles around the table. At the end of the game, each city is scored for its livability. Your final score is the lower of the livability scores of the two cities you helped design. To win, you have to share your attention and your devotion between two cities. The player with the highest final score wins the game. The game features play for 3-7 players in 20-25 minutes, a 2-player variant for head-to-head competition as well as a solo variant (Automa).

Expansions


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Biblios
0 expansion(s).

info from the designer's website THE GAME CONCEPT You are an abbot of a medieval monastery competing with other abbots to amass the greatest library of sacred books. To do so, you need to have both the workers and resources to run a well-functioning scriptorium. To acquire workers and resources, you use a limited supply of donated gold. In addition, you must be on good terms with the powerful bishop, who can help you in your quest. OUTLINE OF GAME PLAY The object of the game is to score the most Victory Points. You win Victory Points by winning any of the 5 categories: Illuminators, Scribes, Manuscripts, Scrolls, and Supplies. You win a category by having the highest total number of workers (Scribes, Illuminators) or resources (Manuscripts, Scrolls, Supplies) in that category. This is determined by the numbers in the upper left corner on the cards. At the start of the game, each category is worth 3 Victory Points. As the game progresses, the values on the Value Board will change and some categories will become worth more or less Victory Points than others. The game is divided into 2 stages: a Donation stage and an Auction stage. During the Donation stage, players acquire free cards according to an established plan. In the Auction stage, players purchase cards in auction rounds. After the two stages, winners of each category are determined and Victory Points awarded. The player with the most Victory Points wins. GAME CHARACTERISTICS The game involves a good deal of strategic planning, some bluffing, and a little bit of luck. The rules are easy to understand, but you have to play it a few times to develop a playing strategy. It plays differently from 2-4 players, but each game is equally fun and challenging. Components: 87 Total Cards 1 Scriptorium 5 Six-Sided Dice (5 different colors) 1 Rule Book Card Size: Standard Card Game (Magic the Gathering and similar CCG's)

Expansions


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Black Stories
0 expansion(s).

50 black stories, 31 crimes, 49 corpses, 11 murders, 12 suicides and one deadly meal. How could that have happened? Black Stories are fiddly, morbid and mysterious riddles for teenagers and adults. The players try to reconstruct the crime by asking, guessing and fiddling about. A spooky card game just right for any party.

Expansions


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Black Stories 2
0 expansion(s).

How could that have happened? Black Stories are fiddly, morbid and mysterious riddles for teenagers and adults. The players try to reconstruct the crime by asking, guessing and fiddling about. Only yes/no answers are allowed. A spooky card game just right for any party.

Expansions


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Black Stories Mystery Edition
0 expansion(s).

How could that have happened? Black Stories are fiddly, morbid and mysterious riddles for teenagers and adults. The players try to reconstruct the crime by asking, guessing and fiddling about. Only yes/no answers are allowed. A spooky card game just right for any party. This version of the black stories has mysteries about vampires, aliens, undead and other fantasy based themes.

Expansions


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Blackbeard
0 expansion(s).

Introduction (from the rule book): BLACKBEARD recreates "The Golden Age of Piracy" at the turn of the 18th century. Each player becomes one or more pirates and attempts to amass a fortune and retire before a King's Commissioner tracks him down, a Warship stumbles across him, or his own crew cuts his throat! Merchant ships plying the trade routes are the targets. Prizes range from near-worthless supplies to the fabulous Spanish and Mogul treasure ships. Luck, skill and cunning all play a part as you comb the Seven Seas (well ... at least three of them) for fame and fortune. Players should be aware that the game simulates 18th century piracy and therefore features random happenstance. Little can be planned. Players who are ready to strike when opportunity presents itself and are wily and aggressive without being rash will fare best in the long run. Players take up the roles of famous pirates navigating the major sea lanes during the golden age of piracy. Plunder and pirateering await as each player moves about on the map in a variable system through a deck of cards. Rather than the normal turn order in games, players move when their designation is drawn in a deck. When not in the role of their pirate they can take on the role of one of the English military ships hunting the sea for pirates. By making shrewd choices and having some luck the player can end the game a wealthy and retired pirate with a large fleet of ships that have been accumulated over the years.

Expansions


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Blokus
0 expansion(s).

Blokus (officially pronounced "Block us") is an abstract strategy game with transparent, Tetris-shaped, colored pieces that players are trying to play onto the board. The only caveat to placing a piece is that it may not lie adjacent to your other pieces, but instead must be placed touching at least one corner of your pieces already on the board. There is a solitaire variation where one player tries to get rid of all the pieces in a single sitting. Components: Blokus Game Board (400 squares) 84 game pieces (four 21-piece sets of red, green, blue, and yellow) Each color inlcudes: 1 one-square piece 1 piece with 2 squares 2 pieces with 3 squares 5 pieces with 4 squares 12 pieces with 5 squares Goal of the Game: Each player has to fit as many of his/her 21 pieces on the board as possible. How to Play: 1. Each player chooses a color and places that set of 21 pieces in front of his/her side of the board. The order of play is as follows: blue, yellow, red, and then green. 2. The first player (blue) places any of his/her pieces in a corner square. Play proceeds clockwise around the board (yellow, red, and green), each player putting their first piece down in one of the corner squares. 3. Play continues as each player lays down one piece during a turn. Each new piece must touch at least one other piece of the same color, but only at the corners. No flat edges of same color pieces can touch. There are no restrictions on how pieces of different colors can touch one another. 4. Whenever a player is unable to place one of his/her remaining pieces on the board, that player must pass his/her turn. End of Game: The game ends when all players are blocked from laying down any more of their pieces. This also includes any players who may have placed all of their pieces on the board. Scores are tallied, and the player with the highest score is the winner. Scoring: Each player counts the number of unit squares in his/her remaining pieces (1 unit square = -1 point). A player earns +15 points if all his/her pieces have been placed on the board plus 5 additional bonus points if the last piece placed on the board was the smallest piece (one square). There are unauthorized versions of the game published under various names, including The Strategy Game, Tetris, Blokád (unofficial Hungarian version with cardboard pieces) and The Family Chess Game.

Expansions


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Blood Bowl (2016 edition)
0 expansion(s).

Description from the publisher: Blood Bowl is a game of Fantasy Football. The basic game features a match between two teams drawn from a number of fantasy archetypes, playing a warped version of American Football. The Blood Bowl boxed game contains two teams: Humans, an all-round team who are flexible enough to adapt to any style of play, or Orcs, who make up in brute force what they lack in finesse. The teams are represented by coloured plastic miniatures, and push-fit assembly is required before use. The game is expandable, and additional rules and teams will be made available through expansion sets and supplements. Actions in the game are resolved through the use of dice. Regular six-sided dice are used to make tests in a number of cases, such as when a player attempts to pick up the ball, pass it, catch it or dodge past an enemy player. Custom dice are used when one player wishes to Block another, using graphics to represent each of the different (but all violent) potential outcomes. The rules in this edition of Blood Bowl are almost identical to those found in the Competition Rules Pack, which was the culmination of several years of development of the Blood Bowl Living Rulebook. This has resulted in an incredibly well-honed game which sees regular competition play around the world. In fact each team takes turns moving, blocking and advancing the football down the field. The game comes with plastic miniatures. This game is a part of the Blood Bowl Series.

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Blood Bowl (first edition)
0 expansion(s).

A Games Workshop Fantasy Football game that stood as something of a cross between American football, rugby and all out war. The first edition of Blood Bowl used cardboard figures to represent the teams and in game flow terms is actually a long way off the much slicker third edition. At the time it simply moved the then cumbersome Warhammer Fantasy Battle system onto a football pitch and was rather bogged down by the resultant tables and charts that dictated the flow of the game. It sowed the seeds however for the far more playable second and third editions and is now something of a collectible classic.

Expansions


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Blood Bowl: Team Manager – The Card Game
1 user(s) want(s) to play.
1 expansion(s).

Game description from the publisher: Blood Bowl: Team Manager - The Card Game is a bone-breaking, breathtaking standalone card game of violence and outright cheating for two to four players. Chaos, Dwarf, Wood Elf, Human, Orc, and Skaven teams compete against each other over the course of a brutal season. Customize your team by drafting Star Players, hiring staff, upgrading facilities, and cheating like mad. Lead your gang of misfits and miscreants to glory over your rivals all to become Spike! Magazine's Manager of the Year! Once a manager has chosen one of the six teams, he has five weeks to groom them into the best in the league, culminating with the Blood Bowl tournament. He does this by competing at highlights, collecting payouts, upgrading his personnel, and drafting Star Players. Managers begin the season with a starting team deck full of basic scrub players. These players are none too bright and have limited talents, but a clever manager can play to their strengths by carefully positioning them to excel on the pitch. Is your team ready to compete against other teams in head-to-head highlights? Highlights are the randomly determined matchups over which players compete. The more highlights a team wins, the more it improves and the more fans it accumulates. The season culminates with the Blood Bowl tournament. After the Blood Bowl, the season ends. Players then tally up their total fans and the manager with the most fans wins the game.

Expansions

  Blood Bowl: Team Manager – The Card Game – Sudden Death


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Blood Rage
0 expansion(s).

"Life is Battle; Battle is Glory; Glory is ALL" In Blood Rage, each player controls their own Viking clan’s warriors, leader, and ship. Ragnarök has come, and it’s the end of the world! It’s the Vikings’ last chance to go down in a blaze of glory and secure their place in Valhalla at Odin’s side! For a Viking there are many pathways to glory. You can invade and pillage the land for its rewards, crush your opponents in epic battles, fulfill quests, increase your clan's stats, or even die gloriously either in battle or from Ragnarök, the ultimate inescapable doom. Most player strategies are guided by the cards drafted at the beginning of each of the three game rounds (or Ages). These “Gods’ Gifts” grant you numerous boons for your clan including: increased Viking strength and devious battle strategies, upgrades to your clan, or even the aid of legendary creatures from Norse mythology. They may also include various quests, from dominating specific provinces, to having lots of your Vikings sent to Valhalla. Most of these cards are aligned with one of the Norse gods, hinting at the kind of strategy they support. For example, Thor gives more glory for victory in battle, Heimdall grants you foresight and surprises, Tyr strengthens you in battle, while the trickster Loki actually rewards you for losing battles, or punishes the winner. Players must choose their strategies carefully during the draft phase, but also be ready to adapt and react to their opponents’ strategies as the action phase unfolds. Battles are decided not only by the strength of the figures involved, but also by cards played in secret. By observing your opponent’s actions and allegiances to specific gods, you may predict what card they are likely to play, and plan accordingly. Winning battles is not always the best course of action, as the right card can get you even more rewards by being crushed. The only losing strategy in Blood Rage is to shy away from battle and a glorious death!

Expansions


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Blue Moon
0 expansion(s).

Blue Moon is a card game for two players, which has often been compared to Magic: The Gathering, although it has considerably different game mechanics. Particularly, it is not a CCG: There are no random cards in any expansion. It can thus be regarded as the first LCG, although it doesn't use that term yet. It is set in the fictional world of Blue Moon, where different peoples fight for dominance of the world and the favor of the Dragons. Each people has its own unique traits and gameplay mechanics, and is represented by a 30 card deck. The standard game box contains the 'Vulca' and the 'Hoax' decks, a small gameboard and three small plastic dragon miniatures, used as scoring counters in the game. Other decks can be bought separately as expansions with 31 or 30 cards each. Rules overview from the official rules: The game consists of independent consecutive fights. The starting player begins the first fight. Each fight is contested in one of two elements, either fire or earth, as announced by the starting player of the fight. During each fight, players take alternate turns to play their cards building up power in their combat and support areas. Basically, each turn the players play a character card and possibly some additional cards to at least match the total power of their opponent, who must then in turn match his opponent’s power, and so on. – If a player is unable to do this, he must retreat from the fight. A fight ends when one of the players retreats. The other player is the winner of the fight and attracts a number of dragons. Both players remove all their cards from their combat and support areas and place them onto their face up discard pile. The retreating player then starts the next fight. Usually, the game ends when one player runs out of cards and retreats from the last fight. Then the player with dragons on his side is the victor and scores some victory points (crystals). A player wins the game instantly if he has all three dragons on his side and then attracts further dragons. Description from the publisher. The world of Blue Moon is in chaos. Its god has abandoned it, and its people are in open war against each other, while the ruling power of three elemental dragons reigns above all! In this original 2-player game designed by Reiner Knizia, each player takes control over one of the Blue Moon peoples - the creative machinations of the Mimix, the fiery Vulca, the lofty Flit, and the clever Hoax - in their quest for dominance. The Blue Moon Legends basic set provides all the material needed to play, including details on the various peoples, a game board, full-color rules, and three plastic dragon figures. Expansion packs contain additional people cards. Blue Moon is part of the Kosmos two-player series.

Expansions


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Blue Moon Legends
0 expansion(s).

Game description from the publisher: The once proud and strong Blue Moon City has been plunged into chaos. The Golden Dragon has fallen, the Holy Crystal of Psi has shattered, and the old King has drawn his last breath. Worse, Blue Moon, the creator of all things, has vanished and Blue Moon City is left without a ruler. Now the three elemental dragons – the only divine creatures remaining in the world – guard the fragments of the Crystal. The two royal heirs, Prince Roland and Princess Elinor, vie for the crown. The peoples of Blue Moon City may not know whom to follow, but whoever can rally them and claim the throne will gain the power to restore the Holy Crystal of Psi and perhaps convince Blue Moon himself to return. Prepare to battle for the throne and restore peace to the city in Blue Moon Legends, a collected version of Blue Moon, Reiner Knizia's classic card game for two players! In Blue Moon Legends, you will gather the allegiance of one of the peoples of Blue Moon City, then lead them in a series of fights against another people. By winning these fights, you aim to attract the fickle attentions of the elemental dragons and win your way to the throne of the city. Players can either play the game straight out of the box with decks or strategically customize the perfect deck to take down their opponent. With hundreds of cards from which to choose, no two games will be the same. Blue Moon Legends contains all cards from award-winning designer Reiner Knizia's Blue Moon card game in a single box.

Expansions


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Blueprints
1 user(s) want(s) to play.
0 expansion(s).

In Blueprints, players are architects who must use different colored dice to build three different structures from blueprints, with the dice providing different advantages to you. In the game, each round progresses like this: Discover your blueprint. Each turn, choose a die and place it in your building. Reveal your building, tally your points, then discover who wins the awards and prizes. After three rounds, players tally their awards and prizes to see who wins. Who will be the best architect?

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Bohnanza
0 expansion(s).

Bohnanza is the first in the Bohnanza family of games and has been published in several different editions. The cards are colorful depictions of beans in various descriptive poses, and the object is to make coins by planting fields (sets) of these beans and then harvesting them. To help players match their cards up, the game features extensive trading and deal making. One of the most unique features of the game is that you cannot rearrange your hand, as you need to play the cards in the order that you draw them. The original German edition supports 3-5 players. The English version from Rio Grande Games comes with the first edition of the first German expansion included in a slightly oversized box. One difference in the contents, however, is that bean #22's Weinbrandbohne (Brandy Bean) was replaced by the Wachsbohne, or Wax Bean. This edition includes rules for up to seven players, like the Erweiterungs-Set, but also adapts the two-player rules of Al Cabohne in order to allow two people to play Bohnanza.

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Bombay
0 expansion(s).

Bombay sees the players take on the role of Merchants in the land of India. In this pick-up and deliver game the players seek to acquire goods at trading posts and deliver them to the cities where they are in demand. Of course they must do so on Elephant back and along the way they can build Palaces, which can earn them riches should the opposition be forced to travel through them. Driving the play, each player must make use of a limited number of Action Points each turn. Visiting each city earns a City Token and having 3 or 4 of these earns rupees. Rupees are also earned for building palaces and collecting client tokens over the course of the game. The players with the best 3 totals also earn rupees and the most rupees gained at the end of the game determines the winner. During the game the players will acquire goods which they will try to resell at the best price in four cities. Each type of good has its own market where the prices of the goods will fluctuate. To transport their goods, each player owns a charming elephant able to transport up to two bundles. Up to now Bombay will be one of Ystari's lightest games. It's the third game of author Cyril Demaegd. Illustrations are by Stéphane Poinsot. Contents: 1 board 5 elephants 5 screens 25 palaces 17 small cubes 12 large cubes 75 coins 53 tokens 1 bag 1 rules

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Boomtown
0 expansion(s).

There's gold in them thar hills! In Boomtown — a game with auctions, dice, and fun/nasty action cards to play on opponents — you start as a gold digger and try to end as a tycoon. To do this, you must first buy the best mining concessions, hoping to find gold veins. You can also try to become the Mayor of Whiskey River or San Narciso, in order to get a small cut on concessions sales, or build a saloon where lucky prospectors will spend their nuggets in moonshine whiskey. If business is really bad, you can still rely on bank or stagecoach hold-ups to reestablish you. A well placed stick of dynamite can also solve some minor problems. Piraci features the same gameplay as Boomtown, but with the players now sailing the waters instead of panning them.

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Bootleggers
0 expansion(s).

It's January 1921. Prohibition has been in effect for a year, and it looks like the 18th Amendment is here to stay. The problem, however, is that outlawing the "manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors" hasn't done anything to reduce the demand for booze! As a result, illegal stills dot the countryside and secret (or not-so-secret!) speakeasies are popping up all over in cities large and small. Local law enforcement may look the other way (especially if they're properly motivated) but Elliot Ness' G-Men are harder to convince. With this much money at stake, organized crime is sure to take an interest. In Bootleggers, players take on the role of enterprising bosses seeking to make a name for themselves in the illegal alcohol trade at the height of the 1920's prohibition era. Deceit, lies, and alliances of convenience are the norm as players attempt to control distribution through money and corruption by muscling in on the competition, paying off the local law authorities, building underground speakeasies, and shipping trucks of "hooch"! Tentative plans for the 2012 edition of Bootleggers include two double-influence cards, four blank cards, more cash, a revised rulebook, colored dice for each player, additional variants (including a two-player scenario), and improved trucks with easier-to-read numbering.

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Brass: Lancashire
0 expansion(s).

Brass: Lancashire — first published as Brass — is an economic strategy game that tells the story of competing cotton entrepreneurs in Lancashire during the industrial revolution. You must develop, build, and establish your industries and network so that you can capitalize demand for iron, coal and cotton. The game is played over two halves: the canal phase and the rail phase. To win the game, score the most victory points (VPs), which are counted at the end of each half. VPs are gained from your canals, rails, and established (flipped) industry tiles. Each round, players take turns according to the turn order track, receiving two actions to perform any of the following: Build an industry tile Build a rail or canal Develop an industry Sell cotton Take a loan At the end of a player's turn, they replace the two cards they played with two more from the deck. Turn order is determined by how much money a player spent on the previous turn, from lowest spent first to highest spent. This turn order mechanism opens some strategic options for players going later in the turn order, allowing for the possibility of back-to-back turns. After all the cards have been played the first time (with the deck size being adjusted for the number of players), the canal phase ends and a scoring round commences. After scoring, all canals and all of the lowest level industries are removed for the game, after which new cards are dealt and the rail phase begins. During this phase, players may now occupy more than one location in a city and a double-connection build (though expensive) is possible. At the end of the rail phase, another scoring round takes place, then a winner is crowned. The cards limit where you can build your industries, but any card can be used for the develop, sell cotton or build connections actions. This leads to a strategic timing/storing of cards. Resources are common so that if one player builds a rail line (which requires coal) they have to use the coal from the nearest source, which may be an opponent's coal mine, which in turn gets that coal mine closer to scoring (i.e., being utilized). Brass: Lancashire, the 2018 edition from Roxley Games, reboots the original Warfrog Games edition of Brass with new artwork and components, as well as a few rules changes: The virtual link rules between Birkenhead have been removed. The three-player experience has been brought closer to the ideal experience of four players by shortening each half of the game by one round and tuning the deck slightly to ensure a consistent experience. Two-player rules have been created and are playable without the need for an alternate board. The level 1 cotton mill is now worth 5 VP to make it slightly less terrible.

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Britannia
0 expansion(s).

Britannia is a historical board game that broadly depicts the millennia-long struggle for control of England, Scotland, and Wales. The game begins with the Roman invasion of 43 A.D., continues through the many struggles between Angles, Saxons, Picts, Norsemen, Scots, Irish, and other tribes, and ends with the Norman invasion of 1066. Britannia allows players to re-create this epic history, re-enacting important battles in some cases, altering the course of history in others. The game rules discourage players from making historically unrealistic moves, but also give players the freedom to alter Great Britain’s history in important ways, creating countless interesting “what if?” scenarios. What if Boudicca’s Revolt against the Romans had been more successful? What if the Romans and the Romano-British had repelled the Saxon invasions of the 5th and 6th centuries? What if William the Conqueror had died during the Norman invasion of 1066? In Britannia, the players will determine the destiny of a kingdom.

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Bubblee Pop
0 expansion(s).

Description from the publisher: Align them all! In Bubblee Pop, players compete head-to-head to save Bubblees by aligning three of them horizontally or vertically. Once aligned, the Bubblees give the player points and trigger special powers. If you pile them the wrong way, though, you risk losing the game immediately.

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Bugs & Co
0 expansion(s).

In this game, everyone plays at the same time, and players' speed and memory skills get a thorough workout! A number of "monster" tiles are spread face down on the table. The aim of the game is to collect as many families of three identical monsters as possible, without being fooled by similar-looking impostors! When the game starts, each player (using one hand only) must turn over and pick up as many "monster" tiles as possible, one by one. Each tile thus collected is placed face down in the player's other hand. Once a player has placed a tile in their second hand, they cannot look at it again or put it back on the table. Any mistakes will cost you dearly, with penalty points at the end of the game for incomplete and mismatched families. A limited number of "trophy" tiles are laid out face up alongside the "monster" tiles. Bonus points are awarded for each "trophy" tile at the end of the game. At any time, a player can pick up the highest-value "trophy" tile still available and place it in their other hand. The player must then stop playing. When the last "trophy" tile is taken, all the players who have collected a "trophy" tile and stopped playing start calling out a ten-second countdown. The game ends when the countdown reaches zero and any players without a "trophy" tile must also stop playing.

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Buzz It!
0 expansion(s).

Buzz It! is a card game with a electronic timer. The players all receive 3 cards which each have 2 questions on them. Each at their turn can ask one of the two questions to the others. When the questions is asked each of the other players must give an answer to the question within a time limit. The players must keep on giving answers until one player can't answer or can't answer quickly enough. This player then receives the question card as a negative point. The timer is handed over to the next player and he/she reads one of the questions on his/her card. The game stops when all the players have used their own question cards and the player with the fewest received cards wins the game. The timer can be set on 5 or 8 seconds and makes a buzzing sound (hence the name)

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Cacao
1 expansion(s).

Cacao is a tile-placement game that immerses players in the exotic world of the "fruit of the Gods". As the chief of your tribe, you must lead your people to prosperity through the cultivation and trade of cacao — and to do that, you'll need to put them to work in the best way possible. In the game, each player has an individual deck of square worker tiles, with the number of workers on each side of the tile varying from tile to tile. The playing area starts with only a couple of jungle tiles in play: a cacao field and a small market; two jungle tiles are laid face up, and the remaining jungle tiles stacked as a draw pile. On a player's turn, she places one of her worker tiles on the board adjacent to one or more jungle tiles already in play, then (if two worker tiles are next to an empty space) adds one of the jungle tiles to the playing area in this space. Her workers then get busy and deliver the results of their effort: If you placed workers next to a cacao field, you receive one or two cacao markers per worker; if they're next to a market, you can choose to sell one cacao marker per worker at the listed price; if next to a well, you receive water; if next to a temple, they stand and look good until the end of the game; and so on. She then refills her hand from her personal deck to three worker tiles. Once all players have used all of their worker tiles, the game ends. Players score (or lose) points based on their water supply, and each temple rewards whichever players sent the most workers to it. In the end, whoever has collected the most gold wins.

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Cadwallon: City of Thieves
0 expansion(s).

Get rich or die trying. It's more than a motto for the thieves of Cadwallon: it's their way of life. You have joined the ranks of the infamous Guild of Thieves, seeking your own path to wealth and glory. Your tiny gang has been chosen to relieve the fat merchants of the city from a portion of their, ahem, "excess" wealth. But there are many factions within the Guild, and yours is not the only band working in the district tonight! In fact, your greatest challenge may not be the militiamen who guard the streets... Cadwallon: City of Thieves is a fast-paced board game of cunning thievery and ruthless skulduggery in a fantasy city steeped in magic and intrigue. Two to four players each control their own gang of four thieves, competing to amass the greatest haul of loot from the many carefully locked chests scattered about the board. This is no friendly competition, however, and there is little loyalty among thieves in Cadwallon! The most successful players are as likely to claim their loot from the other gangs as they are to do the time-consuming legwork themselves... Get ready for a deviously fun battle for treasure! Good fortune in the Guild of Thieves is a double-edged sword that cuts to the bone; other thieves will want your loot, and they have no qualms about drawing your blood to get it. The result is a fast and furious brawl for control of the best treasures in the city. Precious jewels change hands rapidly, and you'll quickly find yourself positioning your gang to not only grab the loot, but defend it desperately.

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Caesar's Legions
0 expansion(s).

Caesar's Legions is a medium complexity wargame simulating the Roman campaigns in Germany at the operational level. Players choose from 5 scenarios ranging from Caesar's own Germanic campaigns to the Batavian revolt of 70 AD. Movement is hex based. Tactical cards effect combat resolution which is dice based and cross-referenced on a probability table. Roman units are divided into cohorts. German units are divided into tribes and enjoy hidden movement when in forest terrain. The game consists of a 22" x 28" map board, over 400 counters (448 counters), playing aids, 16 tactical cards (2 sets of 1 - 8) and a 16-page rulebook.

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Call of Cthulhu: The Card Game
0 expansion(s).

"The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.¨ - H.P. Lovecraft, Supernatural Horror in Literature Welcome to the world of the Call of Cthulhu: The Card Game, a world based on the weird fiction of H.P. Lovecraft and his literary circle. In this world, conflicts rage between cosmic powers who want the world for their own unfathomable purposes and the human agencies dedicated to stopping them. The weird world of H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos has drawn in fans for more than eighty years, with its richly painted themes of suspense, adventure, and the eerie unknown. Call of Cthulhu: The Card Game is fully immersed in this world and what is more, places you, as a player, in control of some of the facets of that world. A typical game of Call of Cthulhu plays very quickly between two players and it has a high-level of player interaction, analysis of open information, planning and strategy. There is a wide variety of possible combinations of factions (Syndicate with Agency, Cthulhu with Hastur, etc.) and each combination will necessitate a different, challenging approach, providing high levels of re-playability. One of the major appeals of the Living Card Game® format is that it gives you not only a solid game experience, full of strategy and excitement, but it also allows you to customize your gaming experience to your liking. As you customize your deck from the Call of Cthulhu: The Card Game card pool, you get to build a strategy around your personal play style. This game was originally a CCG, having been transitioned to Fantasy Flight Games' new Living Card Game (LCG) format. Monthly Asylum Pack expansions to the card pool were eventually supplanted by larger quarterly(-ish) expansion boxes. FFG ended development and organized play support for the game in 2015. "That is not dead which can eternal lie, and with strange aeons, even death may die."

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Camel Up
0 expansion(s).

In Camel Up, up to eight players bet on five racing camels, trying to suss out which will place first and second in a quick race around a pyramid. The earlier you place your bet, the more you can win — should you guess correctly, of course. Camels don't run neatly, however, sometimes landing on top of another one and being carried toward the finish line. Who's going to run when? That all depends on how the dice come out of the pyramid dice shaker, which releases one die at a time when players pause from their bets long enough to see who's actually moving!

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Can't Stop
0 expansion(s).

In this Sid Sackson classic, players must press their luck with dice and choose combinations tactically to close out three columns. The board has one column for each possible total of two six-sided dice, but the number of spaces in each column varies: the more probable a total, the more spaces in that column and the more rolls it takes to complete. On their turn, a player rolls four dice and arranges them in duos: 1 4 5 6 can become 1+4 and 5+6 for 5 & 11, 1+5 and 4+6 for 6 & 10, or 1+6 and 4+5 for 7 & 9. The player places or advances progress markers in the open column(s) associated with their chosen totals, then chooses whether to roll again or end their turn and replace the progress markers with markers of their color. A player can only advance three different columns in a turn and cannot advance a column which any player has closed out by reaching the end space; if a roll doesn’t result in any legal plays, the turn ends with that turn’s progress lost. A predecessor from 1974, The Great Races, exists as a paper-and-pencil game.

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Capital Lux
0 expansion(s).

Description from the publisher: Will you play citizens into your hometown for points, or contribute them to the capital and benefit from their special abilities? In Capital Lux, you always balance on a razor's edge, so will you take risks? Bluff? Or follow a carefully laid plan? The choice is yours in this clever card game, featuring beautiful art by American painter Kwanchai Moriya. Each round begins with the players drafting a hand of five or six character cards. On your turn, you must play a card either in front of you (your hometown) or in the middle of the table (the capital). When you play a card into the capital, you benefit from the card's special ability. Each character belongs to one of four professions, and their special abilities are: Merchant: Take 1 gold coin. Gold coins can be used at the end of a round to increase your own limit for one of the four professions. Agent: Draw a secret modifier card and add it (face down) to one of the four professions in the capital. This will affect the limit of the chosen profession at round's end. Scholar: Draw a card from the deck into your hand. Cleric: Move the lowest valued card of any profession from the capital into your hometown At the end of a round, for each profession, you are not allowed to have a higher total value in your hometown than the current total value in the capital. If you break the limit for one of the professions, you lose all cards of that profession from your hometown. At the end of the third round, all characters remaining in a player's hometown are worth points. This means that for every card there's a dilemma of whether to add it to your hometown for possible points, or to the capital which not only gives you the benefit from a special ability, but also increases the potential points for all players. Since every player is dealt only five or six cards at the beginning of a round, every card play is crucial...

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Capitol
0 expansion(s).

"Architects of the Eternal City". Rivalry in old Rome for the most spectacular buildings and dominance in the Roman prefectures. Whoever uses the 90 blocks and 40 roofs best will win. There are four rounds to a game: Each round has a building phase, an auction phase, a scoring phase and a card drawing phase. In the building phase, players decide on the height of the buildings and build them at the side of the board; if they have the necessary permit, they can build on the board itself. A building is finished when it has a roof; the first roof in a prefecture determines the shape of all other roofs. In the auction phase players can auction for temples, wells and amphitheaters, earning extra points. This is a beautiful production. This game by Alan R. Moon and Aaron Weissblum is a mix of territory acquisition, resource management and even a little auctioning thrown in for good measure. So-called "Architects of the Eternal City", compete in old Rome for the most spectacular buildings and dominance in the Roman prefectures. Whoever uses the 90 blocks and 40 roofs most effectively to secure points will win.

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Captain Sonar
0 expansion(s).

At the bottom of the ocean, no one will hear you scream! In Captain Sonar, you and your teammates control a state-of-the-art submarine and are trying to locate an enemy submarine in order to blow it out of the water before they can do the same to you. Every role is important, and the confrontation is merciless. Be organized and communicate because a captain is nothing without his crew: the Chief Mate, the Radio Operator, and the Engineer. All the members of a team sit on one side of the table, and they each take a particular role on the submarine, with the division of labor for these roles being dependent on the number of players in the game: One player might be the captain, who is responsible for moving the submarine and announcing some details of this movement; another player is manning the sonar in order to listen to the opposing captain's orders and try to decipher where that sub might be in the water; a third player might be working in the munitions room to prepare torpedoes, mines and other devices that will allow for combat. Captain Sonar can be played in two modes: turn-by-turn or simultaneous. In the latter set-up, all the members of a team take their actions simultaneously while trying to track what the opponents are doing, too. When a captain is ready to launch an attack, the action pauses for a moment to see whether a hit has been recorded — then play resumes with the target having snuck away while the attacker paused or with bits of metal now scattered across the ocean floor. Multiple maps are included with varying levels of difficulty.

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Carcassonne
0 expansion(s).

Carcassonne is a tile-placement game in which the players draw and place a tile with a piece of southern French landscape on it. The tile might feature a city, a road, a cloister, grassland or some combination thereof, and it must be placed adjacent to tiles that have already been played, in such a way that cities are connected to cities, roads to roads, etcetera. Having placed a tile, the player can then decide to place one of his meeples on one of the areas on it: on the city as a knight, on the road as a robber, on a cloister as a monk, or on the grass as a farmer. When that area is complete, that meeple scores points for its owner. During a game of Carcassonne, players are faced with decisions like: "Is it really worth putting my last meeple there?" or "Should I use this tile to expand my city, or should I place it near my opponent instead, giving him a hard time to complete his project and score points?" Since players place only one tile and have the option to place one meeple on it, turns proceed quickly even if it is a game full of options and possibilities. First game in the Carcassonne series.

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Carcassonne Big Box 5
0 expansion(s).

Carcassonne is a tile-placement game in which the players draw and place a tile with a piece of southern French landscape on it. The tile might feature a city, a road, a cloister, grassland or some combination thereof, and it must be placed adjacent to tiles that have already been played, in such a way that cities are connected to cities, roads to roads, etcetera. Having placed a tile, the player can then decide to place one of his meeples on one of the areas on it: on the city as a knight, on the road as a robber, on a cloister as a monk, or on the grass as a farmer. When that area is complete, that meeple scores points for its owner. During a game of Carcassonne, players are faced with decisions like: "Is it really worth putting my last meeple there?" or "Should I use this tile to expand my city, or should I place it near my opponent instead, giving him a hard time to complete his project and score points?" Since players place only one tile and have the option to place one meeple on it, turns proceed quickly even if it is a game full of options and possibilities. This Big Box is the same size as other Big Boxes, but with a slightly different component mix. This big box includes the basic game, Inns & Cathedrals, Traders & Builders, Wheel of Fortune, Hills & Sheep and The River. It also includes two extra sets of meeples - one pink and one purple.

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Carcassonne: Hunters and Gatherers
0 expansion(s).

Carcassonne: Hunters and Gatherers is a standalone game in the Carcassonne series set in the stone age. As in other Carcassonne games, players take turns placing tiles to create the landscape and placing meeples to score points from the map they're creating. The player with the most points at the end of the game wins. Instead of cities, roads, and farms, Carcassonne: Hunters and Gatherers has forests, rivers, lakes, and meadows. Players' meeples can represent hunters (when placed in the meadows), gatherers (in a forest), or fishermen (on a river segment). They also have huts, which can be placed on rivers or lakes to get fish from the entire river system. It includes many of the familiar mechanics from Carcassonne with a few new rules, including: - A player who completes a forest with a gold nugget in it gets to immediately draw and place a 1 of 12 bonus tiles. - A meadow is worth 2 points for every animal in it, except tigers, which negate certain other animals. - A river segment is worth the number of tiles in the segment plus the number of fish in the lakes at each end. - A fishing hut scores at the end of the game and is worth the number of fish in all the lakes connected by rivers. The Devir edition includes (the relevant part of) the Carcassonne: King & Scout expansion.

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Carcassonne: The Dice Game
0 expansion(s).

They said it couldn't be done – oh, wait, no one ever said that. In fact, gamers have been predicting the release of this title for at least five years, and now is the time. As part of the tenth anniversary celebrations for the Spiel des Jahres-winning Carcassonne, publisher Hans im Glück and designers Klaus-Jürgen Wrede and Olivier Lamontagne are releasing Carcassonne: The Dice Game, a quick-playing dice game that will allow players to build cities faster than ever before. The game includes nine special dice, a pencil and a block of scoresheets packaged inside a meeple-shaped metal container.

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Carolus Magnus
0 expansion(s).

This game uses a collection of smallish hexagon clusters arranged in a circle. Mercenaries, in the form of small wooden blocks, are placed onto the land pieces. Players can then use these blocks to attempt to gain control of the corresponding mercenary type, or place the same small blocks onto the board which can help the player who controls that color. Once a player has majority of control markers on a piece of land, he can build a tower there. The tower serves as a semi-permanent control marker, as well as a way to win. If two land pieces are controlled by the same player, the land pieces are combined into one, which makes the position harder to take by the other players. The first player to place a set number of towers wins the game, but the game can also end when the land masses are reduced to three or fewer, in which case the player with the most towers placed wins.

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Castellion
0 expansion(s).

The castle at the center of the Oniverse is under attack. The dream denizens of the oniverse rush to build their castle defense against three monster attacks. Towers allow you to see what is coming. Keeps can help minimize damage. Ranks can reduce the effects of the traitors found inside your walls. Of course, the denizens have special powers of their own to aid in the defense. Will you be able to survive these attacks? Castellion is a tile-laying game in which you form parts of the castle for defense against monsters. Each turn you flip over a tile and either use its special ability or place it as part of your castle. The more towers and keeps you form, the better your defense against attacks. Ranks prevent traitorous tiles from affecting you fully. When all three monsters have attacked and you still have a base of six tiles, you win.

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Castle
0 expansion(s).

Bruno Faidutti revisits the medieval setting of Ohne Furcht und Adel with the card game Castle. Players are given a set of square cards which are to be played onto the table, which has a cardboard castle battlement layout. Cards are played into one of four regions: in the courtyard, on the battlements, on the towers, or outside the castle. And when played, the cards will usually allow you to take some sort of special action, which is unique to the card you played. The first player to rid himself of all his cards wins, which can be a tricky proposition at best. A winner of the 2000 Concours International de Créateurs de Jeux de Société.

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Castles of Mad King Ludwig
0 expansion(s).

In the tile-laying game Castles of Mad King Ludwig, players are tasked with building an amazing, extravagant castle for King Ludwig II of Bavaria...one room at a time. You see, the King loves castles, having built Neuschwanstein (the castle that inspired the Disney theme park castles) and others, but now he's commissioned you to build the biggest, best castle ever — subject, of course, to his ever-changing whims. Each player acts as a building contractor who is adding rooms to the castle he's building while also selling his services to other players. In the game, each player starts with a simple foyer. One player takes on the role of the Master Builder, and that player sets prices for a set of rooms that can be purchased by the other players, with him getting to pick from the leftovers after the other players have paid him for their rooms. When a room is added to a castle, the player who built it gains castle points based on the size and type of room constructed, as well as bonus points based on the location of the room. When a room is completed, with all entranceways leading to other rooms in the castle, the player receives one of seven special rewards. After each purchasing round, a new player becomes the Master Builder who sets prices for a new set of rooms. After several rounds, the game ends, then additional points are awarded for achieving bonus goals, having the most popular rooms, and being the most responsive to the King's demands, which change each game. Whoever ends up with the most castle points wins.

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Cat Attack
0 expansion(s).

Cat Attack, suitable for two to six players, aged 8 years and over and made entirely in the EU. The game has been designed with the fun strategy player in mind. Playing time 40 - 180+ mins depending on the number of players. The game Cat Attack is based on the trials and tribulations of the domestic cat. The board represents a local neighborhood. Each player is a (model) cat that lives in its own house. To win the game a cat must fill its larder with six items of food. There is milk at the Dairy, vitamins at the Vet, fish from the Fishmonger and a tin of cat food from the corner shop. There are also (model) birds and mice, which the cats have to catch. Of course, each cat begins the game with nine lives; any cat that loses all of its nine lives is out of the game. Players are dealt a hand of Mog cards; these and a die provide the means to move the cats, birds and mice. The players can choose to move their cats along garden walls or paths or, the more adventurous can travel round the road, this route is a lot quicker but there is a car. Cats can raid other cats larders and attack one another. A pack of Curiosity cards dictate, at random, when the shops open and close and movements of the (model) car. A Curiosity card is picked up when a cat lands on a Curiosity square. Some of these cards are good news but you know what happened to the curious cat!

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Catacombs
0 expansion(s).

If you were directed here from the Catacombs Third Edition rulebook, then you are in the wrong forum. The game entries were split after the Catacombs Third Edition rulebook was printed. The forum for the new edition can be found at this link: https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/195137/catacombs-third-edition Catacombs is an action/dexterity-based adventure board game. One player controls the Overseer, controlling the monsters of the catacombs; the other player(s) control the four heroes who cooperatively try to defeat the monsters and eventually the Catacomb Lord. Each of the heroes has special abilities that must also be used effectively if they are to prevail. The main mechanism of Catacombs is for the players to flick wooden discs representing the monsters and the heroes. Contact with an opposing piece inflicts damage, but missiles, spells, and other special abilities can cause other effects. When all of the monsters of a room have been cleared, the heroes can move further into the catacomb. Items and equipment upgrades can be purchased from the Merchant with gold taken from fallen monsters. The Catacomb Lord is the final danger that the heroes must defeat to win the game; conversely, the Overseer wins if all of the heroes are defeated. The game is designed for quick set-up and fast play within 30 to 60 minutes.

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Catan
0 expansion(s).

In Catan (formerly The Settlers of Catan), players try to be the dominant force on the island of Catan by building settlements, cities, and roads. On each turn dice are rolled to determine what resources the island produces. Players collect these resources (cards)—wood, grain, brick, sheep, or stone—to build up their civilizations to get to 10 victory points and win the game. Setup includes randomly placing large hexagonal tiles (each showing a resource or the desert) in a honeycomb shape and surrounding them with water tiles, some of which contain ports of exchange. Number disks, which will correspond to die rolls (two 6-sided dice are used), are placed on each resource tile. Each player is given two settlements (think: houses) and roads (sticks) which are, in turn, placed on intersections and borders of the resource tiles. Players collect a hand of resource cards based on which hex tiles their last-placed house is adjacent to. A robber pawn is placed on the desert tile. A turn consists of possibly playing a development card, rolling the dice, everyone (perhaps) collecting resource cards based on the roll and position of houses (or upgraded cities—think: hotels) unless a 7 is rolled, turning in resource cards (if possible and desired) for improvements, trading cards at a port, and trading resource cards with other players. If a 7 is rolled, the active player moves the robber to a new hex tile and steals resource cards from other players who have built structures adjacent to that tile. Points are accumulated by building settlements and cities, having the longest road and the largest army (from some of the development cards), and gathering certain development cards that simply award victory points. When a player has gathered 10 points (some of which may be held in secret), he announces his total and claims the win. Catan has won multiple awards and is one of the most popular games in recent history due to its amazing ability to appeal to experienced gamers as well as those new to the hobby. Die Siedler von Catan was originally published by KOSMOS and has gone through multiple editions. It was licensed by Mayfair and has undergone four editions as The Settlers of Catan. In 2015, it was formally renamed Catan to better represent itself as the core and base game of the Catan series. It has been re-published in two travel editions, portable edition and compact edition, as a special gallery edition (replaced in 2009 with a family edition), as an anniversary wooden edition, as a deluxe 3D collector's edition, in the basic Simply Catan, as a beginner version, and with an entirely new theme in Japan and Asia as Settlers of Catan: Rockman Edition. Numerous spin-offs and expansions have also been made for the game.

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Caverna: The Cave Farmers
0 expansion(s).

Following along the same lines as its predecessor (Agricola), Caverna: The Cave Farmers is a worker-placement game at heart, with a focus on farming. In the game, you are the bearded leader of a small dwarf family that lives in a little cave in the mountains. You begin the game with a farmer and his spouse, and each member of the farming family represents an action that the player can take each turn. Together, you cultivate the forest in front of your cave and dig deeper into the mountain. You furnish the caves as dwellings for your offspring as well as working spaces for small enterprises. It's up to you how much ore you want to mine. You will need it to forge weapons that allow you to go on expeditions to gain bonus items and actions. While digging through the mountain, you may come across water sources and find ore and ruby mines that help you increase your wealth. Right in front of your cave, you can increase your wealth even further with agriculture: You can cut down the forest to sow fields and fence in pastures to hold your animals. You can also expand your family while running your ever-growing farm. In the end, the player with the most efficiently developed home board wins. You can also play the solo variant of this game to familiarize yourself with the 48 different furnishing tiles for your cave. Caverna: The Cave Farmers, which has a playing time of roughly 30 minutes per player, is a complete redesign of Agricola that substitutes the card decks from the former game with a set of buildings while adding the ability to purchase weapons and send your farmers on quests to gain further resources. Designer Uwe Rosenberg says that the game includes parts of Agricola, but also has new ideas, especially the cave part of your game board, where you can build mines and search for rubies. The game also includes two new animals: dogs and donkeys.

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Cavum
0 expansion(s).

In the mountain there are veins of precious stones. The players build tunnels in the mountain, establish stations in the mountain and in the city, discover veins of precious stones, acquire precious stones, and sell them. The players get points for stations in the city and for selling precious stones. The winner is the player with the most points. Game Summary The board is a hex grid, with city spaces along most of the edges. The center hex is a vein of yellow gems: place all 9 in a stack there. The rest of the gems go in their individual market areas (priced 1-9 based on supply).Each round (3 in game), add 5 contracts (showing gem combinations; score big VP if completing them; lose some VP if cannot) to the display. Then auction (using VP) turn order chips 1-4. Players then each get the same set of tiles (hexes with various numbers of track exits, prospecting tiles, veins, option tiles, etc.) plus a dynamite hex based on their turn order chip. Take turns taking contracts until everyone passes. Then, on your turn, play 1-4 of your 12 actions. These allow you to place tracks (expanding previous tunnels; you can also cover track tiles with tiles having more exits), stations, or veins (which you supply with gems of your choice). Gems (6 types, 9 tokens each) each have their own market where they are stored and which set their max sell price. The last action is prospecting, where you create a path from one of your stations to another, passing through as many veins as possible: take one gem from each vein. After everyone's 12 actions are used, any exposed dynamite tracks explode and take the adjacent tracks as well (all these are placed in the Buy Pool, which can be accessed by turning in Option tiles)! You score for stations in cities based on the number of empty hexes. Then, for each gem type, players bid (Dutch auction style, bidding for the lowest price they'll accept) and may sell their gems for VP at their bid price. At game end (after 3 rounds), players sell off all their remaining gems (with lowest VP selling next gem), there's another city scoring, and players lose VP for incomplete orders. Most VP wins!

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Caylus
0 expansion(s).

Once upon a time ... 1289. To strengthen the borders of the Kingdom of France, King Philip the Fair decided to have a new castle built. For the time being, Caylus is but a humble village, but soon, workers and craftsmen will be flocking by the cartload, attracted by the great prospects. Around the building site, a city is slowly rising up. The players embody master builders. By building the King's castle and developing the city around it, they earn prestige points and gain the King's favor. When the castle is finished, the player who has earned the most prestige wins the game. The expansion Caylus Expansion: The Jeweller was included in the 2nd Edition. Each turn, players pay to place their workers in various buildings in the village. These buildings allow players to gather resources or money, or to build or upgrade buildings with those resources. Players can also use their resources to help build the castle itself, earning points and favors from the king, which provide larger bonuses. Building a building provides some immediate points, and potentially income throughout the game, since players receive bonuses when others use their buildings. The buildings chosen by the players have a heavy impact on the course of the game, since they determine the actions that will be available to all the players. As new buildings are built, they stretch along a road stretching away from the castle, and not all buildings can be used every turn. Players have some control over which buildings are active by paying to influence the movement of the Provost marker. The final position of the marker is the newest building that can be used that turn. The Provost marker also helps determine the movement of the Bailiff marker, which determines the end of the game. Generally, if players are building many buildings and the Provost is generous in allowing them to be used, the game ends more quickly.

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Caylus Magna Carta
0 expansion(s).

The general theme and mechanics of Caylus Magna Carta are similar to the Caylus board game. However, there is no board or score track and the tactical nuts and bolts of the game are somewhat different. In terms of components, the game consists of cards, money, worker pawns, resource markers, the provost, and castle building stones. Each player has a set of identical cards, which are shuffled and used as a face-down draw deck. Players start with an opening random draw of cards, and on his turn a player can either: extend the road by building a new building pay 1 to draw a new building card pay 1 to discard his hand and draw a fresh hand (with the discard deck being shuffled for a new draw deck once the draw deck is exhausted) pay 1 to place a worker on one of the existing building cards build one of the common prestige building cards (some of which are placed at the beginning of the game as part of the setup) or pass Once everyone has passed, the cards are resolved up to the provost (which can be moved in passing order by paying money). Ownership of the non-common buildings is shown by the card color. When a worker is placed on a card, the owner earns either resources or money as a reward instead of victory points. Players may also choose to help build the castle. Starting with the first player to have passed, players can pay resources to obtain castle stones. The stones are worth three different values (2-4 points). Players collect the most valuable ones first. In addition, the player who collects the most building stones each round is rewarded with a gold resource marker. From round to round, 1st player privileges rotate to the left, and the provost starts two cards further down the path from the castle. The winner of the game is the player who has accumulated the most victory points once the game end has been triggered the turn the castle is finished. Victory points are awarded for castle stones, cards built, and resources and money in hand at the end of the game.

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Celestia
0 expansion(s).

In Celestia, a revamped version of Cloud 9, you board an aircraft with a team of adventurers to perform many trips through the cities of Celestia and recover their wonderful treasures. Your journey will not be safe, but you will attempt to be the richest adventurer by collecting the most precious treasures! At the beginning of a journey, all players place their pawns within the aircraft; the players start the game with six cards in hand (or eight depending on the number of players). At the beginning of each round, one player is chosen to be the captain of the trip and he rolls 2-4 dice to discover the challenges that they will face: fog, lightning bolts, killer birds, or pirates. He must then play the appropriate cards — a compass, a lightning arrester, a foghorn, or even cannons — to continue on the journey and reach the next city. But before the captain plays the appropriate cards, each player must decide whether to stay within the aircraft: If you exit, you're guaranteed the victory points that come from exploring the current city. If you stay on board, you hope to make it to the next city in order to catch more precious treasures. If the captain can't overcome the challenge, though, everyone comes crashing down empty-handed and you'll need to begin a new trip with all passengers on board. During the journey, each adventurer can try to pull out of the game with fabulous objects (a jetpack, astronomy glasses, etc.) or by changing the trip (modifying the travel or abandoning an explorer in the city). As soon as a player earns treasure worth at least fifty points, the game ends and this player wins.

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Century: Spice Road
0 expansion(s).

Century: Spice Road is the first in a series of games that explores the history of each century with spice-trading as the theme for the first installment. In Century: Spice Road, players are caravan leaders who travel the famed silk road to deliver spices to the far reaches of the continent for fame and glory. Each turn, players perform one of four actions: Establish a trade route (by taking a market card) Make a trade or harvest spices (by playing a card from hand) Fulfill a demand (by meeting a victory point card's requirements and claiming it) Rest (by taking back into your hand all of the cards you've played) The last round is triggered once a player has claimed their fifth victory point card, then whoever has the most victory points wins.

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Chaos in the Old World
0 expansion(s).

Chaos in the Old World makes you a god. Each god’s distinctive powers and legion of followers grant you unique strengths and diabolical abilities with which to corrupt and enslave the Old World. Khorne, the Blood God, the Skulltaker, lusts for death and battle. Nurgle, the Plaguelord, the Father of Corruption, luxuriates in filth and disease. Tzeentch, the Changer of Ways, the Great Conspirator, plots the fate of the universe. Slaanesh, the Prince of Pleasure and Pain, the Lord of Temptations, lures even the most steadfast to his six deadly seductions. Yet, as you and your fellow powers of Chaos seek domination by corruption and conquest, you must vie not only against each other, but also against the desperate denizens of the Old World who fight to banish you back to the maelstrom of the Realm of Chaos. Chaos in the Old World features three ways to win, and gives you an unparalleled opportunity to reshape the world in your image. Every turn you corrupt the landscape, dominating its inhabitants, and battle with the depraved followers of rival gods. Each god has a unique deck of gifts and abilities, and can upgrade their followers into deadly foes. Summon forth living manifestations of Chaos, debased and hidden cultists, and the horrifying greater daemons - beings capable of destroying near everything in their path.

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Chez Geek
0 expansion(s).

In this light, humorous, and fast-paced card game that parodies geek culture and co-habitation, players are roommates just trying to get through life with as little work as possible. At setup each player is dealt a Job card which lists their free time, income, a special ability that they possess and their Slack goal. Players are also dealt five Life cards. The space directly in front of a player is their Room, where cards will be played during the course of the game. Slack can be represented using any available chit or counter, but every player begins with a Slack total of zero. Players take turns as follows: -Draw Life cards until they have six in hand. (NOTE: Some Jobs vary this to five or seven cards.) -Make "variable" rolls. Some Job cards have variable free time or income; their values for this turn are decided in this phase (rolling a 1-3 gives them the first amount; rolling a 4-6 gives them the second). If there are any "uninvited" people in a player's room, he or she may also roll to "get rid of" them (by rolling a 4, 5 or 6) and either send each such person to another room or discard them (if they cannot be played to any other room). -If any of the player's in-hand Life cards are green Person cards, they may roll to "call" the person to their room. A successful roll (3-6) gets them invited in; otherwise, they are discarded. Some people are "uninvited" (causing bad things to happen), and may be placed without a roll in any player's room. (See above for "getting rid of" these people.) Pet cards, such as Cats (which don't require a roll to enter a room) and Dogs (which may or may not need to be "called") can also be played in this round. -For each unit of free time the player's Job card gives them, they may perform one action (play a red Activity card) or go shopping (play any number of blue Thing cards). Some of these cards may have a cost; the total cost for all cards played in a round cannot exceed the income given to them by their Job card. (NOTE: Free Time and Income may be modified by certain Whenever cards played on the player by themselves or other players.) -At the end of a turn, if a player has more than five cards in hand, the player must discard cards until they have five or fewer. If desired, players can discard all the way down to one card. (NOTE: It is also legal for a player to play ALL the cards in their hand and have NO cards at the end of a turn.) -Additionally, some Life cards are orange "Whenever" cards which can be played at any time. -Activity cards and Thing cards typically list a Slack value which is added to the player's Slack total, though some have random Slack totals and some have Slack totals which vary during the game. TV Activity cards and some Whenever cards can be used to cancel cards as they are being played, and some cause previously-played cards to be discarded. Some cards add or subtract Slack from every player's total, while others cause a player to change their Job card (and hence Slack goal). Many cards alter the effects of other cards. The first player whose Slack total equals or exceeds their Slack goal is the winner.

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Chicago Express
0 expansion(s).

Harry Wu's Chicago Express is an innovative new boardgame with no luck factor. Chicago Express was originally released in a limited format by Winsome Games as Wabash Cannonball and it was the first game in Winsome's Historic Railroads System. In the game the B&O, C&O, Pennsylvania and New York Central railroads drive from the East Coast across the growing eastern US to Chicago. Smaller, more aggressive railroads like the Wabash spring up to further expand America's extensive railroads. The sharpest railroad executives vie for the maximum return on their investment in this business game lasting about one hour. A session of Chicago Express is played over a maximum of 8 rounds. In each round, the players take turns choosing one of three available actions: - auctioning a share of one of the railroad companies - expanding the rail system of one of the railroad companies - develop one of the board's hexes Of each of those actions only a limited number is available. As soon as all available actions of two options are taken, a dividend phase is executed, where all players gain income from the railroad companies they have shares of. After this dividend phase, the number of actions is reset and a new round begins. The game ends after 8 rounds or if one of the following conditions is met: - 3 or more companies have no more locomotives - 3 or more companies have no more shares - The general supply contains only 3 houses or fewer The player with the most money wins.

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Chinatown
0 expansion(s).

This is a negotiation game in the truest sense of the word. In it, players acquire ownership of sections of city blocks then place tiles, representing businesses, onto the block-sections. At the end of each turn, each tile you've laid gives you some sort of payout, but completed businesses (formed of three to six connected tiles of the same type) pay quite a bit better. All these resources are dealt to the players randomly, however, so players must trade to get matching businesses and adjacent locations. This game is #2 in the Alea big box series.

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Chrononauts
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In Chrononauts, each player becomes a time traveler, with a unique identity and a secret mission. During the game, players travel backwards and forwards through history, doing all those things people have always dreamed of using a time machine to do: Visiting the great moments of the past, peeking into the future, collecting up impossible artifacts and priceless works of art (at the moment just before history records their destruction), coming to grips with the paradoxes of time travel, and of course, changing pivotal events and altering the course of history itself. How would the timeline be different if Lincoln and JFK had not been assassinated? And is that the version of reality that you came from originally... the one you must return to in order to win? It's all packed into a fast and easy Fluxx-style card game that will take you to the beginning of time and back again. Prequel: Early American Chrononauts - can be played together in a combined game. Expanded by: Chrononauts: Lost Identities Chrononauts: The Gore Years several promo cards, though many of these are available in the current base game Re-implemented by: Back to the Future: The Card Game

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Chupacabra: Survive the Night
0 expansion(s).

Turn out the lights and try to be the last mammal standing in this survival dice game based on Latin American folklore. Can you survive the night? In Chupacabra: Survive the Night, which includes 24 glow-in-the-dark dice, each player rolls six dice at the start of the game and uses their rolled Chupacabra to steal other players' chickens, goats, and bulls. One Chupacabra can capture up to two chickens or one goat, and two Chupacabra can capture a bull – but animal packs are immune to Chupacabra so be sure to roll a lot of the same animal! (As if you have the power to control your dice rolls...) When a player rolls all Chupacabras, he becomes "Chupacabra Loco" and can capture all of one type of another animal from a player.

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Churchill
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Description from the designer: The players in the game take on the roles of Churchill, Roosevelt, or Stalin as they maneuver against each over the course of 10 Conferences that determine who will lead the Allied forces, where those forces will be deployed, and how the Axis will be defeated. The player whose forces collectively have greater control over the surrendered Axis powers will win the peace and the game. Churchill is NOT a wargame, but a political conflict of cooperation and competition. While the game focuses on 10 of the historical conferences from 1943 till the end of the war these and much of this design should not be taken literally. Before and after each conference small groups of advisors and senior officials moved between the Allied capitals making the deals that drove the post war peace. Each conference sees one of a group of issues nominated for inclusion in the conference. The issues categories are: Theater leadership changes, directed offensives, production priorities, clandestine operations, political activity, and strategic warfare (A-bomb). Each of the historical conference cards independently puts some number of issues such as directed offensives or production priorities metaphorically put on the table, while the players nominate an additional 7 issues. The game display for this is a circular conference table that the three players sit around behind their 'seat'. Each player has a staff deck of named personages, such as Secretary Stimson and Anthony Eden that are randomly drawn to make your conference hand. A pre-conference round of cards gives leverage to the winner who then moves an issue toward their side of the table equal to the value of the card played. Play then proceeds with the conference where each player in turn plays a card on one of the issues in the center of the conference table moving it the value of the card toward his side of the table. Each card is an historical personage and they often have bonuses if played on a particular category of issue. Contesting an issue has you move an issue away from an Ally toward your own. At all times each player has his Head of State card (Roosevelt, Churchill, or Stalin) that can weigh in on any issue once per conference by discarding another card. Each use of your personage has a bonus and a potential penalty. Each time Roosevelt is used he may die and be replaced by Harry Truman. Churchill can have a heart attack and miss the next conference, while Stalin's paranoia may cause a mini-purge and reduce his side's effectiveness for the remainder of the conference. The net result of the conference play is players will 'win' various issues with the player who won the most issues gaining leverage in one of the bilateral global issues (UK versus USSR global issue is Free Europe versus Spheres of Influence). The game then moves into a post-conference phase where players implement the issues that they now control. These actions impact three basic game functions: clandestine operations, political activity, and military offensives. Clandestine operations has players try to establish political networks in conquered countries and colonies. Using a very simple mechanic of placing a network or removing an opponent's network, the historical ferment that occurred in Yugoslavia, France and across the world is simply simulated. A country or colony can only have one dominant side's network at any given time, and during political activity players can emplace friendly governments in exile that can be subsequently undermined and replaced if the supporting networks are later neutralized by one of your allies. Once this has all been sorted out, the military portion of the game keeps the score. There is a separate display that abstractly represents the major theaters of war, Western, Eastern, Mediterranean, Arctic (Murmansk convoys and Scandinavia), CBI, SW Pacific, Central Pacific, and Far East. Each of these tracks has a Allied front for which I am looking for some kind of 3D tank piece that advances toward Germany, Italy, and Japan. Using a very simple combat mechanic, each front tries to advance with Axis reserves deploying to oppose the various fronts. A successful offensive advances the front one space, although with overwhelming superiority a two-space breakthrough is possible. Naval operations are simply handled by requiring a defined level of support to advance into an amphibious entry space such as France (D-Day). When a front enters Germany, Italy or Japan they surrender, shutting down military operations, although clandestine and political activity continues until the end of the game. In the background is the development of the A-bomb and Soviet efforts to steal its secrets. If the A-bomb is available Japan can be forced to surrender sans a direct invasion. As I stated this is not a wargame, but a three-player excursion into power politics. The game takes around 3 hours to finish, but I will be including a short and medium scenario. All scenarios end with Potsdam, but you will be able to start later in the war if you only have 1 or 2 hours to play. In addition the game can be played with 3 or 2 players plus solitaire. I am very excited about the new Churchill and large scale playtesting will commence by the end of the month. More to follow...

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Château Roquefort
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Each player controls colored mice and tries to collect pieces of cheese in Castle Appenzell. On their turn, players spend action points to put new mice into play, reveal corridors in the castle, move their mice around the castle, or push a tile into play, which changes the maze of cheese pieces underneath. If two of a single player's mice reach a place with the same kind of cheese showing, the player obtains a piece of this cheese. The first player with 4 different pieces of cheese wins the game.

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Citadels
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In Citadels, players take on new roles each round to represent characters they hire in order to help them acquire gold and erect buildings. The game ends at the close of a round in which a player erects his/her eighth building. Players then tally their points, and the player with the highest score wins. Players start with a number of building cards in their hand; buildings come in five colors, with the purple buildings typically having a special ability and the other colored buildings providing a benefit when you play particular characters. At the start of each round, the player who was king the previous round discards one of the eight character cards at random, chooses one, then passes the cards to the next player, etc. until each player has secretly chosen a character. Each character has a special ability, and the usefulness of any character depends upon your situation, and that of your opponents. The characters then carry out their actions in numerical order: the assassin eliminating another character for the round, the thief stealing all gold from another character, the wizard swapping building cards with another player, the warlord optionally destroys a building in play, and so on. On a turn, a player earns two or more gold (or draws two building cards then discards one), then optionally constructs one building (or up to three if playing the architect this round). Buildings cost gold equal to the number of symbols on them, and each building is worth a certain number of points. In addition to points from buildings, at the end of the game a player scores bonus points for having eight buildings or buildings of all five colors. The expansion Citadels: The Dark City was initially released as a separate item, but the second edition of the game from Hans im Glück (packaged in a tin box) and the third edition from Fantasy Flight Games included this expansion. With Dark City, Citadels supports a maximum of eight players.

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City of Horror
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City of Horror is a backstabbing survival-horror game. As in classic zombie movies, a shambling horde is invading the city. The goal is to survive the assault. (Un)fortunately, surviving often means sacrificing some of your fellow players to the undead... Each player controls several characters with different abilities; these characters can move to various limited-capacity locations, which they can then barricade and scavenge for items and weapons. Critical situations, such as zombies breaking in and eating a character, are resolved using a vote. The basic game mechanisms are the same as in Mall of Horror (also designed by Nicolas Normandon), but City of Horror differs in both materials and game play in a number of ways: the city map changes each game, twenty characters are included, they can use antidotes (or die), action cards become scarce as the game goes on, you can gain points with stuff other than surviving characters...

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Cité
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In this fledgling city, things have yet to be built, and opportunities to carve out a commercial empire abound. However, in order to erect the city's largest districts, you'll have to be a shrewd negotiator and a wise spender. Cité includes wood cubes, metal nuggets, pieces of fabric, stones, and more to represent the resources and tiles of different sizes to represent buildings. A building brings you resources and has special effects on other buildings in the neighborhood. In each of the seven turns, you collect resources, possibly exchange them with the other players, and build new constructions. All other rules, namely the effects of buildings, are written on the tiles. Each neighborhood tends to specialize in a few resources, but to undergo new construction you will need a little bit of everything, so there are many trade-based interactions between players. Cité illustrates the workings and limits of mainstream economic theory like the Hecksche-Ohlin model and improves your negotiation skills. Everybody plays at the same time, so you never wait, making Cité quite quick for this category of game.

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Clank!: A Deck-Building Adventure
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Description from the publisher: Burgle your way to adventure in the deck-building board game Clank! Sneak into an angry dragon's mountain lair to steal precious artifacts. Delve deeper to find more valuable loot. Acquire cards for your deck and watch your thievish abilities grow. Be quick and be quiet. One false step and CLANK! Each careless sound draws the attention of the dragon, and each artifact stolen increases its rage. You can enjoy your plunder only if you make it out of the depths alive!

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Clash of Cultures
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From Christian Marcussen, the creator of Merchants and Marauders, comes Clash of Cultures, a civilization game in which each player leads a civilization from a single settlement to a mighty empire. Players must explore their surroundings, build large cities, research advances and conquer those who stand in the way. The game features a modular board for players to explore, 48 distinct advances, seven mighty wonders, and loads of miniatures and cards. The winner will create a culture that will be remembered and admired for millennia. Advances The game features about 48 distinct advances. The whole "tech-tree" is very flexible with no dead ends, yet still intuitive, sensible and "realistic." Additionally you have a great overview of what advances other cultures have - no need to ask - just look. Modular Board Players start with a civilization in its infancy. Move settlers to uncharted regions and reveal the terrain and its resources. Several mechanisms have been implemented to assure that an unlucky placement of region-tiles won't be a decider. Playing Time The game covers a time span similar to AH Civilization - that is to pre-gunpowder. This epic game is playable in about an hour per player! This is a pretty good playing time for a game that covers so much ground as this game will. City management Players expand their cities through the game. But not just to the generic larger city. Players instead choose a building type which represents the growth of the city. For instance you can expand a city with a port, fort, temple and academy - all with different benefits! Additionally cities can be "angry," "neutral" and "happy." Everything integrated in an intuitive and elegant fashion. Multiple paths to victory Earn points through: - Founding cities and increasing their sizes - Advances - Objectives - Wonders - Events

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Claustrophobia
1 expansion(s).

Claustrophobia is a miniatures-based dungeon crawl game set within the universe of Hell Dorado. The box contains pre-painted miniatures which are placed on large tiles showing the dungeon spaces. Also included are character boards, counters and markers, and dice. One player controls a small group of determined humans, while the other plays an almost unending army of demonic creatures. The game is thematic and highly asymmetric: human characters are stronger, but the demon characters are more numerous. Gameplay is very straightforward with a minimum of rules, and each game plays in an hour or less. In essence dice are allocated after rolling to perform actions, while cards or special abilities are also available. The game is about managing decisions and choosing what to do with the resources that you have, managing difficult events and out-thinking your opponent. Combat is handled by dice. Complexity is low, with the focus on theme and building towards a tense, climactic ending. Claustrophobia is played through scenarios of which there are several in the rulebook. Generally speaking the human characters are attempting to complete a task (e.g. escape the catacombs, close a portal) while the demons are focused on stopping them. There are varying win conditions depending on the scenario chosen.

Expansions

  Claustrophobia: De Profundis


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Cockroach Poker
0 expansion(s).

Cockroach Poker is a reverse set collection game that has nothing to do with poker – except that the game is all about bluffing, but with cards that show cockroaches, rats and stink bugs instead of queens, 10s and aces. The goal of the game is to force another player to collect 4 of any one type of critter. The deck includes 64 cards, with eight copies of eight types of critters. To set up the game, shuffle the deck and deal the cards out to players. On a turn, a player takes one card from his hand, lays it face down on the table, slides it to a player of his choice, and declares a type of critter, e.g., "Stink bug". The player receiving the card either • Accepts the card, says either "true" or "false", then reveals the card. If this player is wrong in her claim, she keeps the card on the table in front of her face up; if she is right, the player who gave her the card places it face up before him. • Peeks at the card, then passes it face down to another player, either saying the original type of critter or saying a new type. This new player again has the choice of accepting the card or passing it, unless the card has already been seen by all other players in which case the player must take the first option. The game ends when a player has no cards to pass on his turn or when a player has four cards of the same critter on the table in front of him. In either case, this player loses and everyone else wins.

Expansions


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Coco Schnipp
0 expansion(s).

It's well known that monkeys and crocodiles are mortal enemies, each contesting the territory of the other and engaging in a battle of wills to see who will claim a larger swath of jungle. Manfred and Wolfgang Ludwig's Coco Schnipp trades on this antipathy, pitting the player monkeys against a nasty crocodile while also racing against one another. Each player places his monkey on the starting line of the game board and takes possession of three colored coconuts: red, blue and yellow. On a turn, a player spins the wheel: • If a monkey head appears, that player tries to shoot one of his coconuts into the water hole in the center of the game board. If he succeeds, he moves the monkey ahead 2-4 spaces depending on the color of the coconut used. • If a color appears, each player races to shoot the appropriately colored coconut into the water hole. Whoever does so, or comes closest to the hole, moves his monkey 2-4 spaces. Whenever a player moves his monkey, he may move the crocodile to any free space on the game board. Land on a crocodile and you're scared back five spaces on the race track. The first player to reach the end of the line wins.

Expansions


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Codenames
0 expansion(s).

Two rival spymasters know the secret identities of 25 agents. Their teammates know the agents only by their CODENAMES. In Codenames, two teams compete to see who can make contact with all of their agents first. Spymasters give one-word clues that can point to multiple words on the board. Their teammates try to guess words of the right color while avoiding those that belong to the opposing team. And everyone wants to avoid the assassin. Codenames: Win or lose, it's fun to figure out the clues.

Expansions


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Coloretto
0 expansion(s).

Game play in Coloretto is simple: Either draw a card to play to a row, or take a row of cards to add them to your collection. A row can have at most three cards, so at some point everyone is forced to take a row. Once all the rows have been claimed, players start a new round, drawing or taking once again. What are you trying to do with these cards? Collect huge sets - but only in three colors as every color beyond the third will cost you points. Jokers are highly-prized as they always match what you want, and +2 cards provide sure points, giving you a back-up plan if everything goes south in terms of the colors you're collecting. Once only a few cards remain in the deck, the round ends and everyone tallies their score, choosing three colors of cards to score positively while any other colors count against you. Each color is scored using a triangular number system: the first card in a color is ±1 point, the second card is ±2 points, and so on. The player with the high score wins! A two-player variant is included with some versions of Coloretto, with the only change being that rows can have only 1-3 cards placed in them, depending on the icons on the row cards. Nordic version include extensions: 'Coloretto: The Extra Cards', 'Coloretto: The Limit Cards' and 'Coloretto for two players'.

Expansions


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Colossal Arena
0 expansion(s).

Colossal Arena/Titan: This is a strategic card game for 2 to 5 players: you play, not as combatants, but as spectators, cheering and betting on the melee ongoing in a fantasy arena/colosseum in which fantasy creatures are pitted against each other in battle! Each round one of the creatures will die. To decide which unlucky soul will be the victim, players put numbered power cards in front of the creatures, with the lowest one going to the graveyard. The jockeying for position and strategic diplomacy in playing the numbered power cards can be intense - but what makes this game even more interesting is that the players' place bets throughout the game which will sometimes allow them to use a creature's special power in battle! The winner at the end of the game is the bettor who's raked in the most winnings - just another day in the life of a fantasy monster gambler. Titan: The Arena is actually a reworking of a Reiner Knizia game called Grand National Derby, but The Avalon Hill Game Co's remake was quite significant from a gameplay standpoint. The Titan: The Arena printing is often confused with its namesake, Titan. But other than the fact that they both use fantasy creatures as a general theme, there is very little that is similar between the two. Reimplemented by: Galaxy: The Dark Ages

Expansions


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Colt Express
1 expansion(s).

On the 11th of July, 1899 at 10 a.m., the Union Pacific Express has left Folsom, New Mexico, with 47 passengers on board. After a few minutes, gunfire and hurrying footsteps on the roof can be heard. Heavily armed bandits have come to rob honest citizens of their wallets and jewels. Will they succeed in stealing the suitcase holding the Nice Valley Coal Company's weekly pay, despite it having been placed under the supervision of Marshal Samuel Ford? Will these bandits hinder one another more than the Marshal since only the richest one of them can come out on top? In Colt Express, you play a bandit robbing a train at the same time as other bandits, and your goal is to become the richest outlaw of the Old West. The game consists of five rounds, and each round has two phases: Phase 1: Schemin' Each player plays 2-5 action cards on a common pile, with the cards being face up or face down depending on the type of the round. Instead of playing a card, a player can draw three cards from her deck. Phase 2: Stealin' The action cards are carried out in the order they were played, with a player's best laid plans possibly not panning out due to mistakes and oversights! The game takes place in a 3D train in which the bandits can move from one car to another, run on the roof, punch the other bandits, shoot them, rob the passengers, or draw the Marshal out of position. The train has as many cars as the number of players, and each car is seeded with gems, bags of loot or suitcases at the start of play. Each player starts a round with six cards in hand, with each card showing one of these actions. At the start of a round, a round card is revealed, showing how many cards will be played; whether they'll be played face up or face down, or individually or in pairs; and what action will occur at the end of the round (e.g., all bandits on top of the train move to the engine). You can pick up loot, gems or suitcases only by playing a "steal" card when you're in a train car that holds one of these items — but since everyone is planning to get these goods, you'll need to move, punch and shoot to get others out of your way. You can punch someone only in the same car as you, and when you do, the other bandit drops one of the goods he's collected and is knocked into an adjacent car. Each player's character has a special power, such as starting the round with an extra card, playing your first card face down, or pocketing a bag of loot when you punch someone instead of letting it hit the ground. You can shoot someone in an adjacent car or (if you're running on top of the train) anyone in sight, and when you do, you give that player one of your six bullet cards; that card gets shuffled in the opponent's deck, possibly giving her a dead card in hand on a future turn and forcing her to draw instead of playing something. If the Marshal ends up in the same car as you, likely due to other bandits luring him through the train, he'll be happy to give you a bullet, too. At the end of the game, whoever fired the most bullets receives a $1,000 braggart bonus, and whoever bagged the richest haul wins!

Expansions

  Colt Express: Horses & Stagecoach


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Combat 3000
0 expansion(s).

Combat 3000 are a set generic science fiction 25mm infantry combat war game rules, written by Richard Halliwell and Richard Priestly. There was also one supplement; Combat 3001 (or A Fist Full of Credits), which added some advanced rules and rules for vehicles.

Expansions


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Commands & Colors: Ancients
0 expansion(s).

From the designer (about his Commands and Colors system, C&C: Ancients, and Memoir' 44): "Commands & Colors: Ancients depicts warfare from the Dawn of Military History (3000 BC) to the opening of the Middle Ages (400 AD). Quite an ambitious undertaking for one game, yet Commands & Colors by design is a unique historical game system which allows players to effectively portray stylized battles from this time in history. The 15 battles, showcased in the scenario booklet, although stylized, focus on important terrain features and the historical deployment of forces in scale with the game system. The battles include Bagradas, Cannae, and Zama." "The scale of the game fluctuates from battle to battle. For some scenarios, an infantry unit may represent a legion of fighters, while in other scenarios a unit may represent just a few brave warriors. But the tactics you need to execute conform remarkably well to the advantages and limitations inherent to the various units, their weapons, terrain and time." "Unlike its older brother, Battle Cry by Avalon Hill Games, Inc., Commands & Colors: Ancients is moderately more complex and contains additional historical details without the battlefield clutter. Most scenarios will still play to a conclusion in less than an hour." "The command card system, drives movement, creates a true fog of war and presents both challenges and opportunities. There are four types of command cards: Leadership cards, Section cards, Troop cards and Tactic cards." "The battle dice system resolves all combat efficiently and quickly. Each battle die has one Light, one Medium, one Heavy, one Leader, one Flag and one Swords symbol." "The game mechanics, although simple, will still require strategic card play, historical tactics, timely dice rolling, and an aggressive yet flexible battle plan, to achieve victory."

Expansions


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Commands & Colors: Napoleonics
0 expansion(s).

Commands & Colors: Napoleonics allows you to re-fight epic battles of the Napoleonic era. In this core volume, the focus is on the French and the British, two bitter rivals in the struggle for European preeminence during the time of Napoleon. As with other games in the Commands & Colors genre, units in both armies can only move and fight when ordered. The command playing cards supply those orders, providing an element of luck that creates a fog of war and presents players with both challenges and opportunities. You must maximize your opportunities by playing your command cards judiciously. How well you handle the diverse units, their weapons, and the terrain, will determine victory.

Expansions


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Conan
1 expansion(s).

Conan, designed by Fred Henry and based on the Conan universe by Robert E. Howard, is a scenario-based semi-cooperative asymmetric miniatures board game. One player is the Opponent, playing the Opposition forces, and the other players (1 to 4) play Conan and his companions: Shevatas the thief, Hadrathus the Priest/Sorcerer, Belit the pirate queen, Valeria the warrior, etc. The game is based purely on Robert E. Howard's novels and short stories (and not the movies or other non-Howardian material). The publisher has hired Patrice Louinet, a Howard expert, to make sure the art and the scenarios are compatible with Howard's vision. Each game is a scenario, played on a map. There will be several maps — Pictish Village, Underground temple, Tavern, Pirate ship, etc. — and each map can have several scenarios set on it. The game is fast, one hour approximately. It's possible to play several scenarios in a campaign, but you can also play each scenario individually. There will be a dozen playable scenarios in the base box. At the beginning of a scenario, players choose their team (Conan and two or three other heroes). The Opponent gathers all the miniatures (picts, Necromancer, skeleton warriors, monsters, etc.), tokens, cards from the chosen scenario. The game usually plays in a limited number of turns (ten, for instance). Each scenario can have very different objectives: find the princess captured by picts and hidden in a hut and leave the camp before the pict hunters return; find the magical key to open a sealed door, steal the jewel and leave; kill the Necromancer by the end of turn 10; survive by the end of turn 10; escape the prison; etc. During their turn, the heroes can activate or rest. If they activate, they can spend "gems" from their energy pool to do all sorts of actions: move, fight (melee or distance), defend, pick a lock, reroll, etc. If they rest, they can move a lot of gems from their "spent" pool box to their "available" pool box. When they take an action, they throw a number of dice equal to the number of gems they put in their action. There are three different kinds of dice: yellow (the weaker dice), orange (medium) and red (strong). Each character has a color based on their specialty: Conan throws red dice in combat while the Sorcerer throws yellow dice in combat; the thief throws red dice in Manipulation actions, while Conan throws orange dice; etc. Each player can have equipment cards (armor, magic potions, weapons, etc.) which give them bonuses on their dice rolls. The Opponent plays differently. He uses a board with eight slidable tiles, plus his own Energy gems. Each tile corresponds to one unit (1 to 3 miniatures) on the game mat, and all of the miniature abilities are written on this tile (movement, armor, attack, special abilities). The tile position on the board corresponds to the numbers 1-8. The Opponent has a pool of energy gems and each time he activates one unit, he needs to spend a number of gems matching the tile placement: tile#1 costs 1 energy gem, tile#2 costs 2 gems, etc. Whatever tile the Opponent chooses to activate, he spends the corresponding energy cost (moving his energy gems from the available pool to the spent pool), then takes the tile out and moves it to the end of the sliding track: If he wants to activate this unit again, it will cost him 8 gems, because the unit is now on position 8. The Opponent can activate a maximum of two tiles, and he regains only a certain number of gems each turn (depending on the scenario). In a typical scenario, the heroes need to accomplish something and the Opponent wins if the heroes fail to reach their objective — but in some scenarios, the Opponent has his own objectives and the Heroes win if they prevent him from accomplishing his goal. Components (according to the back of the box): 16 spell cards (in either English or French) 39 equipment cards (in either English or French) 60 tiles (actually 75, see below) 161 tokens 8 Hero sheets (one side in English, the other in French) 4 player aid sheets (one side in English, the other in French) 1 turn counter sheet (both sides in English) 1 Hero rule book (in either English or French) 1 Overlord rulebook (13 scenarios) (in either English or French) 2 map boards 15 dice 75 "gems" (blue and red) 25 coloured bases (5 each in red, orange, green, blue, purple) 106 miniatures (plastic) 1 Overlord board (plastic) The tiles need to be looked at more closely. 13 come in English-French pairs, another 35 are in the edition's language (either French or English), and the remaining 14 tiles come in non-lingual pairs (two each of Khosatral Khel, Skuthus, Thak, Zaporavo, and Zogar Sag, plus four Thog). The campaign book and adventure booklets use two tiles for Constantius, Khosatral Khel, Thog, Zaporavo, and Zogar Sag. Conan: Nordheim includes a scenario that uses three Atali tiles. The non-lingual pairs (or the Thog quadruplet) are thus probably intended to be all used. This means a functional set of tiles is 62 strong, the remaining 13 tiles being set aside.

Expansions

  Conan: Collectors Box


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Concept
0 expansion(s).

In Concept, your goal is to guess words through the association of icons. A team of two players – neighbors at the table – choose a word or phrase that the other players need to guess. Acting together, this team places pieces judiciously on the available icons on the game board. To get others to guess "milk", for example, the team might place the question mark icon (which signifies the main concept) on the liquid icon, then cubes of this color on the icons for "food/drink" and "white". For a more complicated concept, such as "Leonardo DiCaprio", the team can use the main concept and its matching cubes to clue players into the hidden phrase being an actor or director, while then using sub-concept icons and their matching cubes to gives clues to particular movies in which DiCaprio starred, such as Titanic or Inception. The first player to discover the word or phrase receives 2 victory points, the team receives points as well, and the player who ends up with the most points wins.

Expansions


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Concordia
1 expansion(s).

Two thousand years ago, the Roman Empire ruled the lands around the Mediterranean Sea. With peace at the borders, harmony inside the provinces, uniform law, and a common currency, the economy thrived and gave rise to mighty Roman dynasties as they expanded throughout the numerous cities. Guide one of these dynasties and send colonists to the remote realms of the Empire; develop your trade network; and appease the ancient gods for their favor — all to gain the chance to emerge victorious! Concordia is a peaceful strategy game of economic development in Roman times for 2-5 players aged 13 and up. Instead of looking to the luck of dice or cards, players must rely on their strategic abilities. Be sure to watch your rivals to determine which goals they are pursuing and where you can outpace them! In the game, colonists are sent out from Rome to settle down in cities that produce bricks, food, tools, wine, and cloth. Each player starts with an identical set of playing cards and acquires more cards during the game. These cards serve two purposes: They allow a player to choose actions during the game. They are worth victory points (VPs) at the end of the game. Concordia is a strategy game that requires advance planning and consideration of your opponent's moves. Every game is different, not only because of the sequence of new cards on sale but also due to the modular layout of cities. (One side of the game board shows the entire Roman Empire with 30 cities for 3-5 players, while the other shows Roman Italy with 25 cities for 2-4 players.) When all cards have been sold or after the first player builds his 15th house, the game ends. The player with the most VPs from the gods (Jupiter, Saturnus, Mercurius, Minerva, Vesta, etc.) wins the game.

Expansions

  Concordia: Salsa


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Condottiere
0 expansion(s).

It is 13th century Italy. Trade is flourishing between the city-states and the Levant. Venice, Florence, and Genoa are all bursting with wealth. However, each city-state is also plagued with a weak national army, leaving them defenseless against invasion from their envious neighbors. Enter the Condottiere. As veteran English soldiers returned from the Crusades, Italy found itself with an influx of desperate and capable men. These hired swords were contracted to fight for individual city-states by an agreement known as a condotta. The most elite of these men were the mercenary leaders known as the Condottiere. The object of Condottiere is to acquire four connected provinces in renaissance Italy. To do this players auction off different provinces on the board and bid on these provinces with a hand of cards representing mercenaries, seasons, scarecrows, and political figures. However, unlike standard auctions in which only the highest bidder loses their bid, in Condottiere every player loses their bid. Players are, in effect, bidding the number of troops they are willing to lose in order to win a province. However, several special effect cards shake the contests up and keep the players guessing.

Expansions


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Confrontation
0 expansion(s).

Confrontation is a miniature skirmish game. Each blister of Rackham miniatures contains the game rules and a reference card giving the statistics of the miniatures just bought. Just like in similar games, players assemble an army of a certain race. Each warrior is paid for by points; the better it's capabilities, the higher it's point cost. From the rules: Confrontation is a game which marks the beginning of Rag'narok in skirmishes with often crucial consequences. Confrontation offers a simple game system that enables you to simulate small skirmishes between rival factions with loads of game play and fun. To start playing Confrontation, you will need a few 6 sided dice (D6). You can start a game with your friends just after choosing your figurines ! As you build up bigger armies, you will be able to use the Rag'narok rules to simulate bigger conflicts. Some rules differ between Confrontation and Rag'narok but to go from one system to the other will present no difficulty, the game principles being the same. Re-implemented by: Confrontation: The Age of the Rag'Narok Rag'narok Expanded by: Confrontation: Dogs of War See also: Tabletop RPG Cadwallon

Expansions


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Confrontation: The Age of the Rag'Narok
0 expansion(s).

Confrontation and Rag'narok merge into one game: Confrontation: The Age of the Rag'Narok. No longer played with single miniatures (Confrontation) or massive units (Rag'narok), each player commands several small units of two to fifteen miniatures. Completely new concepts like Elixir Points and Tactics were added to this game, while it still uses many of the well-known Confrontation traits like an abundance of special abilities and the use of profile cards to determine the activation sequence. The core rules along with profiles for several of the factions are available for download (free of charge) on Rackham's website. Re-implements: Confrontation Rag'narok

Expansions


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Conquest of the Empire
0 expansion(s).

This game is a remake of the 1984 classic that was part of Milton Bradley's Gamemaster Series. In this game you are one of many Roman generals vying for power in Imperial Rome, employing legions, cavalry, and catapults to reach your objectives. This version of the game has two sets of rules, one set similar to the original version (except that it has fixed the broken catapult rules) and a new set of rules based on Martin Wallace's Struggle of Empires. Re-implements: Milton Bradley's Conquest of the Empire (1984)

Expansions


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Cosmic Encounter
2 expansion(s).

From the Manufacturer Build a galactic empire... In the depths of space, the alien races of the Cosmos vie with each other for control of the universe. Alliances form and shift from moment to moment, while cataclysmic battles send starships screaming into the warp. Players choose from dozens of alien races, each with its own unique power to further its efforts to build an empire that spans the galaxy. Many classic aliens from earlier editions of this beloved game return, such as the Oracle, the Loser, and the Clone. Newly discovered aliens also join the fray, including Remora, Mite, and Tick-Tock. This classic game of alien politics returns from the warp once more. In Cosmic Encounter, each player is the leader of an alien race. On a player's turn, he or she becomes the offense. The offense encounters another player on a planet by moving a group of his or her ships through the hyperspace gate to that planet. The offense draws from the destiny deck which contains colors, wilds and specials. He or she then takes the hyperspace gate and points at one planet in the system indicated by the drawn destiny card. The offense vs. the defenses ships are in the encounter and both sides are able to invite allies, play an encounter card as well as special cards to try and tip the encounter in their favor. The object of the game is to establish colonies in other players' planetary systems. Players take turns trying to establish colonies. The winner(s) are the first player(s) to have five colonies on any planets outside his or her home system. A player does not need to have colonies in all of the systems, just colonies on five planets outside his or her home system. These colonies may all be in one system or scattered over multiple systems. The players must use force, cunning, and diplomacy to ensure their victory.

Expansions

  Cosmic Encounter: Cosmic Incursion

  Cosmic Encounter: Cosmic Conflict


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Coup
0 expansion(s).

You are head of a family in an Italian city-state, a city run by a weak and corrupt court. You need to manipulate, bluff and bribe your way to power. Your object is to destroy the influence of all the other families, forcing them into exile. Only one family will survive... In Coup, you want to be the last player with influence in the game, with influence being represented by face-down character cards in your playing area. Each player starts the game with two coins and two influence – i.e., two face-down character cards; the fifteen card deck consists of three copies of five different characters, each with a unique set of powers: Duke: Take three coins from the treasury. Block someone from taking foreign aid. Assassin: Pay three coins and try to assassinate another player's character. Contessa: Block an assassination attempt against yourself. Captain: Take two coins from another player, or block someone from stealing coins from you. Ambassador: Draw two character cards from the Court (the deck), choose which (if any) to exchange with your face-down characters, then return two. Block someone from stealing coins from you. On your turn, you can take any of the actions listed above, regardless of which characters you actually have in front of you, or you can take one of three other actions: Income: Take one coin from the treasury. Foreign aid: Take two coins from the treasury. Coup: Pay seven coins and launch a coup against an opponent, forcing that player to lose an influence. (If you have ten coins or more, you must take this action.) When you take one of the character actions – whether actively on your turn, or defensively in response to someone else's action – that character's action automatically succeeds unless an opponent challenges you. In this case, if you can't (or don't) reveal the appropriate character, you lose an influence, turning one of your characters face-up. Face-up characters cannot be used, and if both of your characters are face-up, you're out of the game. If you do have the character in question and choose to reveal it, the opponent loses an influence, then you shuffle that character into the deck and draw a new one, perhaps getting the same character again and perhaps not. The last player to still have influence – that is, a face-down character – wins the game! A new & optional character called the Inquisitor has been added (currently, the only English edition with the Inquisitor included is the Kickstarter Version from Indie Boards & Cards. Copies in stores may not be the Kickstarter versions and may only be the base game). The Inquisitor character cards may be used to replace the Ambassador cards. Inquisitor: Draw one character card from the Court deck and choose whether or not to exchange it with one of your face-down characters. OR Force an opponent to show you one of their character cards (their choice which). If you wish it, you may then force them to draw a new card from the Court deck. They then shuffle the old card into the Court deck. Block someone from stealing coins from you.

Expansions


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CO₂
0 expansion(s).

In the 1970s, the governments of the world faced unprecedented demand for energy, and polluting power plants were built everywhere in order to meet that demand. Year after year, the pollution they generate increases, and nobody has done anything to reduce it. Now, the impact of this pollution has become too great, and humanity is starting to realize that we must meet our energy demands through clean sources of energy. Companies with expertise in clean, sustainable energy are called in to propose projects that will provide the required energy without polluting the environment. Regional governments are eager to fund these projects, and to invest in their implementation. If the pollution isn't stopped, it's game over for all of us. In the game COâ‚‚, each player is the CEO of an energy company responding to government requests for new, green power plants. The goal is to stop the increase of pollution, while meeting the rising demand for sustainable energy — and of course profiting from doing so. You will need enough expertise, money, and resources to build these clean power plants. Energy summits will promote global awareness, and allow companies to share a little of their expertise, while learning still more from others. In COâ‚‚, each region starts with a certain number of Carbon Emissions Permits (CEPs) at its disposal. These CEPs are granted by the United Nations, and they must be spent whenever the region needs to install the energy infrastructure for a project, or to construct a fossil fuel power plant. CEPs can be bought and sold on a market, and their price fluctuates throughout the game. You will want to try to maintain control over the CEPs. Money, CEPs, Green Power Plants that you've built, UN Goals you've completed, Company Goals you've met, and Expertise you've gained all give you Victory Points (VPs), which represent your Company's reputation – and having the best reputation is the goal of the game ... in addition to saving the planet, of course.

Expansions


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Cranium
0 expansion(s).

Cranium bills itself as the "whole-brain" game. It's a party game that borrows from a host of other popular party games of recent times. Players have to successfully complete activities in each of four sections to win: In - Creative Cat : A player must clue a word to his or her teammates by drawing it, sculpting it in clay, or drawing it with his or her eyes closed. - Data Head : A variety of trivia questions. - Word Worm : Players unscramble words, spell challenging words, guess definitions, identify words with letters left out, or spell words backwords. - Star Performer : players must whistle a song, impersonate a celebrity, or act out a clue. Cranium has elements similar to those of Pictionary, Charades, Trivial Pursuit, Celebrities, Huggermugger, Claymania, etc. Expanded by: Cranium Booster Box 1 Cranium Booster Box 2 Cranium New York Booster Pack

Expansions


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Crazy Kick
0 expansion(s).

2006 is the year of the football world championship and ligretto, the fast paced action card games pays it tribute. Online Play BrettspielWelt (real-time) Winner of the "Schweizer Spielepreis 2006" (best family game)

Expansions


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Crazy Time
0 expansion(s).

Somewhere in the universe creatures exist that count the hours in order for time to flow. Eternity being quite long, to make passing time more enjoyable, they invented a game with rules that change all the time! In Crazy Time, the players count the passing hours while revealing cards from their personal deck. Their goal is to get rid of all of their cards. But beware! Time has its own Laws and whoever forgets them will fall in a "Temporal Flaw" and collect all of the cards played so far, further delaying his victory! Crazy Time is a mix of deduction, concentration, speed and laughter!

Expansions


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Crisis: Tokyo
0 expansion(s).

Today is Tokyo... tomorrow ...The world! In the shadows of the known universe, the Lords of Evil crave conquer Earth and become masters of everything as it exists. But everything has a beginning master plan: the destruction of Tokyo! All his minions launched on the city to put under the yoke of chaos, but only one can be master of Tokyo. Play as one of the Lords of Evil Tokyo, throws terrible threats against the city to destroy his most famous spots and defeat your opponents plans using heroes. Each card offers two paths and you must choose one of them, only one is the road to victory, only one is the path to the destruction of Tokyo. In Crisis: Tokyo you will find 110 cards that include 24 locations of Tokyo ready to be destroyed. 80 characters, heroes and monsters to launch into battle. 80 events that will tip the scales dramatically.

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Crossing
0 expansion(s).

In Crossing, you have to collect gemstones, but players make their choices simultaneously and not everybody will get what they want when desires clash — and even if you are lucky during the initial confrontation, you aren't safe from the greediness of other players. Through bluffing and cunning, you want to collect more gemstones than your opponents. To do this, you place a set of cards side by side on the table, with each card featuring a varying number of gems. When signaled, each player simultaneously places a finger on one of the cards. You collect the stones only if you are alone on the card! The French version of Crossing includes rules for play with only three whereas the initial Japanese release of Xing included rules only for 4-6 players.

Expansions


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Cry Havoc
1 expansion(s).

A man-to-man medieval combat wargame. Each side is comprised of peasants, sergeants, bills, men-at-arms, and knights. Various scenarios are included in the rules. Integrates with: Outremer The Cry Havoc series page contains information about the game system and history of the game including fan expansions.

Expansions

  Siege


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Cuba Libre
0 expansion(s).

In December 1956, paroled rebel Fidel Castro returned to Cuba to launch his revolution with virtually no political base and—after a disastrous initial encounter with government forces—a total of just 12 men. Two years later, through masterful propaganda and factional maneuver, Castro, his brother Raúl, and iconic revolutionary Che Guevara had united disparate guerrillas and exploited Cubans’ deep opposition to their dictator Fulgencio Batista y Zaldívar. Castro’s takeover of the country became a model for Leftist insurgency. Castro’s Insurgency Following up on GMT Games’ Andean Abyss about insurgency in modern Colombia, the next volume in the COIN Series, Cuba Libre, takes 1 to 4 players into the Cuban Revolution. Castro’s “26 July Movement” must expand from its bases in the Sierra Maestra mountains to fight its way to Havana. Meanwhile, anti-communist student groups, urban guerrillas, and expatriates try to de-stabilize the Batista regime from inside and out, while trying not to pave the way for a new dictatorship under Castro. Batista’s Government must maintain steam to counter the twin insurgency, while managing two benefactors: its fragile US Alliance and its corrupting Syndicate skim. And in the midst of the turmoil, Meyer Lansky and his Syndicate bosses will jockey to keep their Cuban gangster paradise alive. COIN Series, Volume II Cuba Libre will be easy to learn for Andean Abyss players—both volumes share the same innovative GMT COIN Series system. Like Volume I, Cuba Libre is equally playable solitaire or by multiple players up to 4—and with a shorter time to completion than Andean Abyss. But Cuba Libre’s situation and strategic challenges will be new. A deck of 48 fresh events brings 1950s Cuba to life and includes … • The Twelve: The first wave’s escape to the Sierra Maestra—inspirational legend or harbinger of defeat? • El Che and Raúl: Brilliant in the field, or bungling hostage-takers? • Operation Fisherman: Can the rebels pull off a second invasion? • General Strike: Urban disruption or rebel embarrassment? • Radio Rebelde: Are the masses tuning in, or just the Army direction finders? • Pact of Caracas: Can the rebels unite? • Armored Cars: Mobile striking power, but in whose hands? • Rolando Masferrer: Brutal pro-government tactics—will they help or hurt? • Fat Butcher: Can the Mob’s enforcer protect its casinos? • Sinatra: Frankie’s Havana show a boom or bust, and who collects? … and much more. New twists match the COIN Series system to the situation in 1950s Cuba: • It’s the insurgents who build lasting capabilities, while the Government is limited to fleeting bursts of momentum. • The Syndicate’s bases are Casinos—expensive to build, but so important to Cuba no army will destroy them. • Syndicate special activities include calling in the “muscle” of Government troops and police to protect mob assets. • Stacks of Syndicate cash awaiting launder can fall in anyone’s hands—even the corrupt Government’s. • The Government has its own terror tactic—reprisals—and can skim a portion of Syndicate profits. • The eroding US Alliance with Batista overshadows all Government actions, not just through aid levels but also through the day-to-day ability of troops and police to operate. • Even if Batista flees, the struggle may not end—the counterrevolutionary government may even become stronger! Multiplayer, 2-Player, Solitaire Cuba Libre provides up to 4 players with contrasting roles and overlapping victory conditions for rich diplomatic interaction. For 2- or 3-player games, players can represent alliances of factions, or the game system can control non-player factions . Or a single player as the Cuban Revolutionaries can attempt to topple Batista and seize power for themselves. The non-player sides will fight one another as well as the players, but too much power in the hands of any one of them will mean player defeat. More COIN Series Volumes to Come Andean Abyss and now Cuba Libre present a game system on modern insurgency readily adaptable to other conflicts, particularly those featuring the interaction of many sides (thus the name COunterINsurgency Series). A rich and under-represented history of guerrilla warfare beckons, as modern insurgency offers virtually unlimited, under-gamed topics for the COIN Series. Volume III is A Distant Plain—Insurgency in Afghanistan. Volume IV is Fire in the Lake—Insurgency in Vietnam.

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Cubulus
0 expansion(s).

In Cubulus you want to be the first player to create a square in your color on one side of the cube. Do this, and you win the game. On a turn, you add a colored ball to the 3x3x3 playing area by pushing it into place – possibly pushing other balls out of the way – or change the order of balls in a completed row by pushing them one space, then reinserting the ball pushed out of the row. With two players, one color of balls is neutral. Keep your eyes on all sides of the cube to prevent others from squaring off for the win.

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Cuckoo Zoo
0 expansion(s).

Cocotaki is a Uno-style card game in which you must match the animal or color of the card on the top of the discard pile in order to play a card. When you play, you have to make the appropriate animal sound. If you forget to make this sound, you get penalty cards. If you place down a red card you must not make any sound – except when you place down the red rooster, in which case you shout "Cocotaki!" The first player who has no cards left wins. The game includes many additional rules for advanced play. Kakadoo is an updated version of Cocotaki that incorporates a number of the optional rules from that earlier game. As a result, the minimum playing age has been raised from 5 to 8. Players now draw four penalty cards instead of two when they mess up, and whenever a lion is played, the player doesn't roar but says, "Hello, your majesty". Play a donkey, and only donkeys can follow in the next round; play a cockatoo to skip the next player.

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CUPONK
0 expansion(s).

This game is for one to as many people want to play. As described in the rules there are 2 CUPONK (Ping Pong with graphics) balls and a 30 Card "Trick Deck" that the player draws from, it illustrates a specific trick to attempt and the number of tries to complete it. If the player completes the trick in the amount of tries given they collect the card and the next player draws a new trick. If the player fails to complete the trick in the number of tries, then the next player attempts the same trick. Follow the same rules for completing the trick. If all players fail, then discard the trick and move on to the next trick card, it would now be the original first player's turn again. You can play until any preset goal you want, first to three tricks, five tricks, or until the deck is gone and count up the totals. The game even recommends combining 2 or more trick cards into "Expert" tricks. Each of the three versions has their own trick deck, so if you purchased all three you can combine them into one 90 card deck. Also included are blank cards for making up your own. It's actually way more fun than you would think, and the cup lights up and makes sound effects unique to the version you purchased. The cards are really just stepping stones to making your own even more elaborate tricks. -----From the Box----- What exactly is CUPONK? The object: sink your ball into the cup and light it up. Get it in and you’ll hear the sweet sounds of victory, YEAH! You rock. Miss the shot and your friends get the chance to one-up you. When playing CUPONK your entire home can become a legitimate playing field. Tables, walls, chairs – IT’S ON! Test out sick trick shots like Door Jam, Stairing Contest and Wall Banger. What you don’t like the names? Okay tough guy, make up your own! Show your skill and sink sick shots. Features lights and crazy (gorilla / wild wrestling / killer zombie) sounds! Includes 1 CUPONK cup, 2 CUPONK balls, 30 trick cards, a ramp accessory and instruction guide. Requires 3 AAA batteries (not included). For 1 or more player(s). Ages 9 and up. [Taken from HASBRO Site] There are three versions in the first wave: Gorillanator, El Campeon, Let it R.I.P. The second wave includes three versions: Boomshakalaka, Monsterosity, King of L.A. A deluxe edition, Le Flush Royale,was released alongside the second wave. It includes a cup with a plastic lid/backboard, Cuponk head band, five stickers, six balls, a set of thirty cards and instructions. There are also two different sets of extra balls. They each include seven new balls and five stickers.

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Cutthroat Caverns
0 expansion(s).

"Without teamwork, you will never survive. Without betrayal, you’ll never win." Cutthroat Caverns is played over 9 rounds, each with a random encounter. Essentially a game of 'kill stealing'. Each round, any monster encountered will have a prestige value of 1 through 6. The player that successfully jockeys for position and lands the killing blow gets the prestige value for the encounter. Some encounters will not have a specific monster, such as a trap room for the heroes to pass through (and in this case, earning no prestige). The surviving player with the most prestige after the 9 encounters is the winner. If the players do not survive all 9 encounters, no one wins the game. A unique combination of cooperative game play and opportunistic backstabbing.

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CV
0 expansion(s).

Have you ever wondered who you would have been if your life had gone differently? How would you direct your life if everything were up to you? Maybe you would be a magician, or travel around the world? Or maybe big business tempts you, and your goal would be to earn a million dollars? "CV" means curriculum vitae – your resume – and in the dice and card game CV you will lead a character through his entire life, making many choices about friends, relations, jobs and activities. Everything is possible: a dream job, new relationships and skills. You can be whoever you want! Gameplay is built around the Yahtzee-style dice rolling and re-rolling system. On their dice, players are trying to roll sets of symbols that allow them to acquire cards; each round these cards give benefits of some kind, such as new symbols and special abilities. At the end of the game, each kind of card scores points for the player.

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Cyclades
2 expansion(s).

In this latest collaboration between Bruno Cathala and Ludovic Maublanc, players must buy the favor of the gods in their race to be the first player to build two cities in the Ancient Greek island group known as the Cyclades. Victory requires respect for all the gods - players cannot afford to sacrifice to only one god, but must pay homage to each of five gods in turn. Each turn, the players bid for the favors of the gods, as only one player can have the favor of each god per turn - and each player is also limited to the favor of a single god per turn. Ares allows the movement of player armies and the building of Fortresses. Poseidon allows players to move their navies and build Ports. Zeus allows his followers to hire priests and build temples. Athena provides her worshipers with philosophers and universities. Apollo increases the income of his worshipers.

Expansions

  Cyclades: Hades

  Cyclades: Titans


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Cyrano
0 expansion(s).

Description from BoardgameNews.com: While Cyrano de Bergerac was a real person, Cyrano is based on the play Cyrano de Bergerac, written more than two hundred years after Cyrano’s death. In both the play and the game, Cyrano writes poetry to woo a woman for another man. The game Cyrano lasts a number of rounds, and each round starts with a player revealing a theme card and two rhyme cards ("-aid", "-ed" and so on with homonyms being acceptable). Each player then composes a quatrain (a poem of four lines) with two of the lines ending with one of the rhymes and the other two ending with the other rhyme. Players read their poems and score points Boggle-style, with each unique ending word being worth one point; these points are recorded by blacking out squares on a ladder, which represents the lover’s climb toward his object of affection. Everyone then secretly votes on which poem he or she most appreciated, whether for its beauty, adherence to theme, or some other artistic qualification. Players reveal their votes simultaneously, and for each player who voted the same way you did, you receive one point, with these points being recorded by the maiden’s descent from the tower. Whichever player first brings the loves onto the same floor of the tower wins, with ties being broken by a rhyming duel.

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Da Clash!
0 expansion(s).

Each gamer plays with 2 fighters, on a wrestling ring divided in 9 zones. Da Clash! is fast and fun, but you’ll need reflection and tactics if you want to make your opponents bite the dust. Stretch, warm up, roll the dices… and no, unlike in other games, a 1 and a 2 are not weaker than a 5 or a 6. Every dice is precious and can be used in different ways: -you can activate your fighters and determine their initiative, -launch Special or Bonus Attacks, -create combinations to earn Zen or Rage tokens…well, if you win the bet. -or fill your Superpowa gauge a bit more… On the other hand, the two sources of power of a fighter: the Zen and the Rage tokens can be stocked and will allow you to make your fighters faster, more resistant or aggressive…And if you have enough of them, you’ll even be able to launch your fighter’s Superpowa to inflict him a 3-Hits Combo! But stay watchful even if you have almost reduced his Tonus Points to zero, you could be punched in the back... everything's allowed in Da Clash!

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Dark Moon
0 expansion(s).

WELCOME TO DARK MOON. The Noguchi Masaki interplanetary mining corporation welcomes you to its outpost on Titan, the dark moon of Saturn! You will be joining an experienced crew of miners, technicians, and adventurous souls who live to experience all the wonders that our solar system has to offer. Purpose, loyalty, camaraderie, friendship, and sacrifice all await you as a new and valued member of the Noguchi Masaki family! DARK MOON (formerly known as BSG Express), is a game of deception and betrayal at the cold edge of space. You are a crew member on a deep space mining expedition to Titan, the dark moon of Saturn. During a routine excavation, an “incident” occurs whereby some of the crew become infected with an unknown virus, and become paranoid, deceitful, and violent, trying to destroy the others. At the start of the game, players are divided into two teams: Uninfected and Infected. The Uninfected team simply needs to survive until the end of the game, while the Infected team secretly attempts to destroy them. Each player knows which team they are on, but does not know which team the other players are on! Who is your teammate and who is your enemy? Can you trust your best friend? And why doesn’t anyone trust you when you tell them you’re one of the good guys?! Roll dice, overcome traumatic events, throw your friends in quarantine when you don’t believe them, and (if you’re Infected) betray everyone at just the right moment to secure victory!

Expansions


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Days of Glory: Rules for Wargaming the American Civil War
0 expansion(s).

These miniatures rules were designed specifically for the American Civil War period. Days of Glory is a set of rules for 15mm wargaming at the regimental scale. Cavalry and Infantry stands represent 50 men each. Artillery, Engineers and Staff stand represent 10 men each. An artillery gun represents two actual guns.

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DC Comics Deck-Building Game
0 expansion(s).

Game description from the publisher: Batman! Superman! Wonder Woman! Aquaman! The Flash! Green Lantern! Cyborg! The Justice League of America is ready for action – are you? Fight the never-ending battle for truth, justice, and peace in the DC Comics Deck-Building Game! To start the game, each player chooses one of the seven over-sized hero cards, each of which has a special power, and starts with a deck of ten cards. Each turn, a player starts with a hand of five cards and can acquire or conquer the five types of cards in the game: heroes, villains and super-villains, equipment, super powers, and locations. To defeat villains, you'll need to have power – but when a super-villain is defeated, a new one comes into play, attacking all the heroes while doing so. Make sure you've acquired defenses – like superspeed or bulletproof powers, or The Batsuit equipment – to protect yourself from harm. Craft your hero deck into a well-oiled machine to take on the most vile villains in the DC Universe in your quest for victory (points)!

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DC Comics Deck-Building Game: Heroes Unite
0 expansion(s).

In the DC Comics Deck-Building Game: Heroes Unite, each player takes on the role of a Super Hero such as Shazam!, Hawkman, Red Tornado, Nightwing, Black Canary, Batgirl, or Booster Gold. Your Super Hero has an ability that will guide your strategy throughout the game. Each player starts with his own basic ten-card deck and draws a hand of five cards each turn. Power is the currency you will use to buy new, stronger cards to add to your deck. There are five different types of cards that can be acquired: Villains, Heroes, Equipment, Super Powers, and Locations. Unlock special abilities, like Force Field or the Helmet of Fate, and unleash devastating card combos against your opponents! Craft your hero deck into a well-oiled machine to take on the most vile villains in the DC Universe in your quest for Victory (Points)! Mix the cards from Heroes Unite with the core DC Comics Deck-Building Game set to wage the ultimate showdown! Integrates with: DC Comics Deck-Building Game

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De Bellis Antiquitatis
0 expansion(s).

A flexible, fast-playing set of miniatures rules. An army consists of 12 units (called "elements"), classified as Blades, Warband, Knights and so forth. The rules are very simple (and can actually fit on one sheet of paper) but nevertheless pretty effective. The Fantasy version is Hordes of the Things, and the De Bellis Multitudinis rules add more detail and significantly increase army size. De Bellis Renationis extends the time period through the end of the Renaissance (1700 AD) and Horse, Foot and Guns covers the period from 1701 to 1915.

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De Bellis Multitudinis
0 expansion(s).

A moderately abstract set of Ancient and Medieval miniatures rules. This ruleset is the bigger brother of De Bellis Antiquitatis. It covers the same time period (3000 BC - 1500 AD) through four volumes of army list books. Armies are typically built to 300-500 points, and can encompass anywhere between 150 and 400 figures grouped onto individual elements.

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Dead Man's Draw
0 expansion(s).

Dead Man's Draw is a simple and strategic card game of risk and reward for 2 to 4 players. Players take turns drawing cards and combining their special abilities to plunder the most loot without busting their entire hands. The core of your turn in Dead Man’s Draw is all in the flip: pulling the top card off the deck and using its special ability. Your turn isn’t over until you say it is, though. You can keep pulling cards as long as you like – until you play a card of a suit already seen, at which point you lose everything. Knowing when to stop and "bank" your cards is the biggest decision you make in Dead Man’s Draw, but being too timid lets braver opponents pass you up with bigger, more profitable turns. The cards’ special abilities are key to success in Dead Man’s Draw, and they build off of each other. Each suit in DMD has an effect that the player can target when they flip a card of that suit. Anchor – Keep everything you drew before the Anchor even if you bust. Cannon – Destroy one card an opponent has previously banked. Chest – Double your haul by banking as many cards directly from the discard pile as are in the river when you bank the Chest – but only if you also bank a Key. Hook – Play one of your previously banked cards. Key – Enables the Chest special. Kraken – Oh no! You’re forced to draw at least two more cards. Map – Draw three cards from the discard pile and play one. Mermaid – No ability, but worth more points (Mermaids are numbered 4-9 instead of 2-7). Oracle – Look at the next card before deciding if you want to play it. Sword – Steal an opponent’s previously banked card and play it. Many of these work well together, like using a Hook to re-play a Sword from your hand to steal an opponent’s Chest to go with your Key – racking up huge points by playing abilities well and not solely through the luck of the draw. As soon as the deck is depleted, players total up the value of the highest card they’ve banked from each suit. High score wins.

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Dead Men Tell No Tales
0 expansion(s).

Skelit's Revenge....the most feared ship on the high seas....and you've finally taken it. Captain Fromm and his skeleton crew have amassed a massive treasure, and now is your chance to take it all. Players take on the role of Pirates who are boarding Skelit's Revenge for one purpose....to take the loot. They must battle the flames, the skeleton crew, and their own fatigue if they hope to make it out alive. Dead Men Tell No Tales is a co-operative game for 2-5 players. The game uses the common Action Point system to determine what a player does on their turn...with a twist. As players work together, they can pass their Actions on to their teammates in order to best utilize the assets that they have. Players will build the board as they play, ensuring that no two games will ever be alike. As they search the ship for the Treasure, they will encounter Enemies and Guards that they must battle, along with various items that will help them in their quest. all the while, battling the inferno that resulted when they took over the ship. Unique systems for tracking fire, enemy movement, and a player’s fatigue all combine into an interesting and unique cooperative gaming experience. Do you and your crew have what it takes to make off with all of the treasure and live to tell the story? Or are you going down with the ship in Dead Men Tell No Tales?

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Dead of Winter: A Crossroads Game
0 expansion(s).

Game description from the publisher: "Crossroads" is a new series from Plaid Hat Games that tests a group of survivors' ability to work together and stay alive while facing crises and challenges from both outside and inside. Dead of Winter: A Crossroads Game, the first game in this series, puts 2-5 players in a small, weakened colony of survivors in a world where most of humanity is either dead or diseased, flesh-craving monsters. Each player leads a faction of survivors with dozens of different characters in the game. Dead of Winter is a meta-cooperative psychological survival game. This means players are working together toward one common victory condition — but for each individual player to achieve victory, he must also complete his personal secret objective. This secret objective could relate to a psychological tick that's fairly harmless to most others in the colony, a dangerous obsession that could put the main objective at risk, a desire for sabotage of the main mission, or (worst of all) vengeance against the colony! Certain games could end with all players winning, some winning and some losing, or all players losing. Work toward the group's goal, but don't get walked all over by a loudmouth who's looking out only for his own interests! Dead of Winter is an experience that can be accomplished only through the medium of tabletop games. It's a story-centric game about surviving through a harsh winter in an apocalyptic world. The survivors are all dealing with their own psychological imperatives, but must still find a way to work together to fight off outside threats, resolve crises, find food and supplies, and keep the colony's morale up. Dead of Winter has players making frequent, difficult, heavily- thematic, wildly-varying decisions that often have them deciding between what is best for the colony and what is best for themselves.

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Dead of Winter: The Long Night
0 expansion(s).

Dead of Winter: The Long Night is a standalone expansion for Dead of Winter: A Crossroads Game that introduces the Raxxon location where horrible experiments will spill out into the town unless players can contain them. The game has players at a new colony location trying to survive with new survivors against brand new challenges. Can you handle being raided by members of other colonies? Will you explore more and unravel the mysteries of the Raxxon pharmaceutical location to find powerful items but release stronger enemies? Or will you upgrade your colony to help it better withstand the undead horde? These are all choices you will get to make in this new set, and if you want, you can mix in the survivors and cards from the original set to increase the variety even more.

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Deep Sea Adventure
0 expansion(s).

From the rulebook: A group of poor explorers hoping to get rich quickly heads out to recover treasures from some undersea ruins. They're all rivals, but their budgets force them all to share a single rented submarine. In the rented submarine, they all have to share a single tank of air, as well. If they don't get back to the sub before they run out of air, they'll drop all their treasure. Now it's time to see who can bring home the greatest riches. Game Objective The game takes place over 3 rounds, and the player to gain the most points over the 3 rounds is the winner. In order to gain points, you must bring the most ruins chips back to the submarine. You can only return to the submarine once per round, and you cannot progress more after returning. You cannot return to the submarine without bringing any ruins chips. Turn Progression On their turns, players conduct steps 1-4 listed below. Players take turns, going clockwise around the board, and the round ends when all players have returned to the submarine, or if the air runs out at the beginning of someone's turn. 1) Declare if you will turn back or not. 2) Reduce air. 3) Roll the dice and advance your game piece. 4) Search. (When you have stopped moving, select one of A-C below) A) Do nothing. B) Pick up ruins chip. C) Place a ruins chip.

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Deluges
0 expansion(s).

Déluges, the board game! At 20,000 BC, Earth knows the end of an ice age, characterized by a meltdown and a major rising waters. During this period, which ends around 6000 BC, the sea level rises almost 130 meters. The goal is to develop your civilization before it is swallowed by the waves. To develop your civilization, you must distribute, collect and share resources with other players. But if the players overexploit the resources and develop too quickly, they impoverish the land, the water will rise and the play area will get smaller. Additionally you can take the competing populations and force them to work as slaves, but you must also work to keep your population from turning into fanatics or becoming enslaved. The players earn points for both how developed their civilization is and how sustainable it is.

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Descent: Journeys in the Dark
0 expansion(s).

Descent: Journeys in the Dark is a semi-cooperative game in which two to five players will take on the antagonistic roles of heroes and Overlord. Up to four players will choose characters with a wide assortment of skills and innate abilities to be the heroes who will explore dungeons in search of treasure and adventure. One player will take on the role of the Overlord and will control the dungeon's many traps, puzzles, and monsters. The heroes' goal will be to cooperatively conquer the dungeon, seize its many treasures, and achieve other objectives as set by the scenario. If the heroes cooperate and achieve their goals, they will all win. The Overlord's objective is simply to use all the means at his or her disposal - from deadly traps and ferocious monsters - to kill the heroes. Each hero has a certain Conquest Point value to the party and if too many Conquest Points are lost through hero death, the party loses and the Overlord wins. Re-implemented by: Descent: Journeys in the Dark (Second Edition) (2012)

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Descent: Journeys in the Dark (Second Edition)
0 expansion(s).

Game description from the publisher: Descent: Journeys in the Dark (Second Edition) is a board game in which one player takes on the role of the treacherous overlord, and up to four other players take on the roles of courageous heroes. During each game, the heroes embark on quests and venture into dangerous caves, ancient ruins, dark dungeons, and cursed forests to battle monsters, earn riches, and attempt to stop the overlord from carrying out his vile plot. With danger lurking in every shadow, combat is a necessity. For such times, Descent: Journeys in the Dark (Second Edition) uses a unique dice-based system. Players build their dice pools according to their character's abilities and weapons, and each die in the pool contributes to an attack in different ways. Surges, special symbols that appear on most dice, also let you trigger special effects to make the most of your attacks. And with the horrors awaiting you beneath the surface, you'll need every advantage you can take... Featuring double-sided modular board pieces, countless hero and skill combinations, and an immersive story-driven campaign, Descent: Journeys in the Dark (Second Edition) transports heroes to a vibrant fantasy realm where they must stand together against an ancient evil. Compared to the first edition of Descent: Journeys in the Dark, this game features: Simpler rules for determining line of sight Faster setup of each encounter Defense dice to mitigate the tendency to "math out" attacks Shorter quests with plenty of natural stopping points Cards that list necessary statistics, conditions, and effects A new mechanism for controlling the overlord powers Enhanced hero selection and creation process Experience system to allow for hero growth and development Out-of-the-box campaign system Descent 1st edition Conversion Kit Descent: Journeys in the Dark (second edition) – Conversion Kit

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Deus
1 expansion(s).

In Deus, players work to develop their own civilizations in a shared environment. Each player starts the game with five building cards, and on a turn a player either uses one of these cards to construct a building or discard one or more cards to make an offering to a god. Cards come in six colors: red for military, green for resource production, blue for trade, brown for scoring, purple for temples, and yellow for a variety of effects. When you construct a building, you build it in the appropriate location on the modular game board — which is sized based on the number of players with the hexagonal tiles composed of seven landscape "circles" — then you place the card in your personal tableau in the appropriate stack of colored cards and activate the power of all of those cards already in your tableau, starting with the card at the bottom of the stack. When you make an offering, you discard cards, then receive the help of a god associated with one of the cards that you discarded, with the number of cards determining the strength of the associated action. You then refill your hand to five cards. The game ends either when all the barbarian villages on the game board have been surrounded and attacked or when all the temples have been constructed. Whoever has the most points wins.

Expansions

  Deus: Egypt


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Diamant
0 expansion(s).

Diamant — also published as Incan Gold — is a quick, fun press-your-luck game. Players venture down mine shafts or explore paths in the jungle by turning up cards from a deck and evenly sharing the gems they find on the way, with any leftover gems being placed on the card. Before the next card is revealed, you have the chance to leave the mine and stash your holdings, including any gems you get on the way out. Why would you leave? Because the deck also contains hazards: scorpions, snakes, poison gas, explosions and rockfalls. When a particular hazard is revealed for the second time (e.g., a second scorpion), anyone still in the shaft or on the path has to drop all the gems they've collected that round and flee for safety. The trick is that as more players leave each turn, your share of the pie grows larger, which will perhaps inspire you to explore deeper — but at the risk of ending up with nothing. All editions of Incan Gold and later editions of Diamant include five artifact cards that are shuffled into the deck of gem and hazard cards, either one per round or all at once. When an artifact card is revealed, no on can take this card and it's placed on the path. If exactly one player leaves at the end of a turn, they collect not only all gems that remain on the path, but the artifact as well, which is worth points at the end of the game.

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Diamonds
0 expansion(s).

Diamonds is a trick-taking card game in which players collect Diamonds — not cards bearing that suit, mind you, but rather actual "Diamond Crystals" (acrylic crystals) included in the game. What makes the game of Diamonds different from other trick-taking card games is that when you cannot follow suit you get a "Suit Action" based on what suit you do play. Suit Actions are also taken by the winner of each trick, as well as at the end of a full Round of play. Suit Actions will enable players to take Diamond Crystals from the Supply, moving them to their Showroom (where they may score 1 point) or to their Vault (where they will score 2 points). The Vault is a secure area, but the Showroom is vulnerable to theft by the other players. The deck in Diamonds consists of sixty cards, numbered 1-15 in the standard suits. In each round, the players start with a hand of ten cards. One player leads a card, and everyone else must play one card, following suit if possible. As you play a card, if you cannot follow suit, you immediately get a Suit Action in the suit you did play. The player who played the highest card in the suit that was led wins the trick, and also gets a Suit Action. The player who won the trick leads a card to start the next trick. After a full Round of ten tricks, whoever has taken the most cards in each suit once again gets a Suit Action. If a player has taken no tricks, that player gets two Diamonds Suit Actions. Players then start a new round. Whoever has the most points in Diamond Crystals at the end of the game wins!

Expansions


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Dice City
1 user(s) want(s) to play.
0 expansion(s).

The Kingdom of Rolldovia is in turmoil. Her royal highness, the Queen, has decreed that there will be a new capital after the old one was sacked by hordes of barbarians and bandits from the south. As leaders of one of the country's influential noble families, players vie with each other to establish their provincial city as the best home for Rolldovia's new capital. You must choose your city's path in gaining the approval of all others in the kingdom. Dice City is a "dice-crafting" game in which the locations in your city act as the changing faces of your dice each turn. Use tactics and strategy to press your claim! You each have several ways to promote your city; create strong armies; construct wondrous buildings; or open up trade routes. The secret is to manage your city and its natural resources carefully to make the best of your fortunes.

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Dice Forge
0 expansion(s).

Heroes, stand ready! The gods are offering a seat in heaven to whichever hero defeats their rivals. Your courage and wits will be your most precious allies as you use divine dice to gather resources along the road to victory. Your divine dice are exceptional, with removable faces! Customize your dice to make them more powerful as the game progresses. Sacrifice gold to the gods to obtain enhanced die faces. Upgrade your dice to produce the resources you need. Overcome ordeals concocted by the gods to grow in glory and earn rewards. Skillfully manage the luck of the dice and take charge of your destiny. Only the greatest will ascend to the heavens! Dice Forge is a development game featuring innovative mechanics based on dice with removable faces. In this dice crafting game, players build their own dice. Roll your dice, manage your resources, complete ordeals before your opponents and explore multiple winning strategies. Now you control the luck of the dice!

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Dice Town
0 expansion(s).

Each player gets a cup with five poker dice and eight dollars. Each turn, a player will put together a poker hand and depending on the roll, take control of various key places in Dice Town that will allow him to perform the corresponding action of the location. In a turn, all players shake their cup and take out all but one die, which is kept apart from the others. They repeat the process with the remaining dice until all five dice are on the table. Players may want to keep more than one die; they pay one dollar for each additional die. Now the locations are checked... Nines: In the gold mine, the player with the most 9's may take one nugget from the mine for each nine he has thrown. Tens: In the bank, the player with the most 10's may rob the bank and take all bills there - each two bills represent one victory point at game end. Jacks: The player who has the most J's goes to the general store and draws as many cards as he had thrown J's, keeping one. These cards may give from one to eight points, or entitle a player to perform the saloon or general store action twice in a row, place a die with a result of a player's choice under the cup without rolling, or steal 4 dollars from another player. There are many more cards of this kind that spice up the game. Queens: The player with the most Q's in his roll wins the favor of the girls, and takes advantage of their charm to steal from an opponent. He may take as many cards from his opponent as he has thrown Q's, keeping one and giving back the others. Kings: The player with the most K's becomes the new sheriff; he decides who wins in any ties, but the sheriff can be influenced with nuggets, cards, or money. Aces/Poker hand: In the town hall, the player with the best poker hand gets a property claim worth from one to five victory points. Having aces in the best poker hand permits taking additional cards. Finally, if a player did not win anything during a turn, he might visit Doc Badluck where he can choose any one of the following: - equip oneself with barbed wire - the player has two property claims that cannot be stolen; - draw the first card from the general store pile; - all other players must give the player two dollars; - an ace will bring a nugget from every other player. The game ends when there are no more gold nuggets in the mine or when all property claims have been issued. Players count their points: 1 for each nugget, 1 for every two dollars, 5 for whomever is currently sheriff, and each general store and property card for its value.

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Die Legenden von Andor: Chada & Thorn
0 expansion(s).

Description from the publisher: To Andor! Chada the archeress and Thorn the fighter travel from the northern end of Silberland to the southern coast of the island. The dwarfs there will help them cross back to Andor. On their voyage, thrilling adventures and new challenges await them. They will reach safe harbor only if they stick together, yet a sinister enemy follows their steps. Die Legenden von Andor: Chada & Thorn, a two-player cooperative card game set in the world of Andor, tells the story of two heroes returning from the north (the setting for Die Legenden von Andor: Die Reise in den Norden). The players may choose one of four ready-to-play adventures, and the placement of the tiles allows them to experience new routes and different challenges.

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Difference
0 expansion(s).

Based on the popular "spot the differences" challenges found in books, newspapers and elsewhere, Difference challenges your abilities to observe and react quickly. The deck includes two sets of double-sided cards, with one set being more challenging than the other. Place one card in the center of the table, then deal the rest out to players as evenly as possible. To start, each player looks at the top card of her stack, then tries to spot the two differences between her card in hand and the reference card on the table. Whoever spots her particular differences first stops play, demonstrates them to everyone, places her card on top of the reference card (creating a new challenge for everyone), then draws the next card from her deck. Whoever gets rid of all of her cards first wins!

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Dino Twist
0 expansion(s).

Sharp your claws and fangs, avoid disasters , meteors and gather the strongest dinosaurs! Dino Twist is a family game of cards , fast and smart, where players will have to fight the Dinos on the island of Twist, then recover them on their islands to score the most points. But beware to the events that will spice up the battles !!! The goal of the game is to have the strongest Dino on our island. How to play. At the begin chose randomly 10 events on the 25, it will give a 10-15 mn game. At the beginning of each turn, you reveal a event that apply for all players (except the first turn). All players together, choose Dino from their hand, place it face down and reveal simultaneously. If you play the same Dino (same species and same strength) you can't attack the Island of Twist and you discard your Dino in the cemetery. The smaller Dino strike first, attack the Dino on the Island of Twist, and take it back to is own Island. Each species can only attack their specie. To attack a Dino, your Dino must be strongest (look at the number of strength) At the end of the 10 events, the player with the most point on his island is the winner. There is bonus, for the player who finish the Island first, second and third, and the player with the most Dino with big claws). In the game, you have two different Island, one for children, initiation and one for adult more advanced game. In the advanced game you will have to respect the territories and species, whereas in the children game, you will be free to put any Dino of any species on your Island.

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Diplomacy
0 expansion(s).

This classic game of pure negotiation has taken many forms over the years. The first The Avalon Hill Game Co version has perhaps the widest release, but Avalon Hill Games, Inc. re-released the game in 1999, complete with a colorful new map and metal pieces. In 2008, Avalon Hill released a 50th anniversary edition with a new map and cardboard pieces representing the armies and navies. In the game, players represent one of the seven "Great Powers of Europe" (Great Britain, France, Austria-Hungary, Germany, Italy, Russia or Turkey) in the years prior to World War I. Play begins in the Spring of 1901, and players make both Spring and Autumn moves each year. There are only two kinds of military units: armies and fleets. On any given turn, each of your military units has limited options: they can move into an adjoining territory, support an allied unit in an attack on an adjoining territory, support an allied unit in defending an adjoining territory, or hold their position. Players instruct each of their units by writing a set of "orders." The outcome of each turn is determined by the rules of the game. There are no dice rolls or other elements of chance. With its incredibly simplistic movement mechanics fused to a significant negotiation element, this system is highly respected by many gamers. Avalon Hill Complexity rating - 3 Re-implemented by: Colonial Diplomacy Diplomacy: Classical Variant Diplomacy: Hundred Variant

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Discoveries
0 expansion(s).

The Lewis and Clark Expedition, which was commissioned in 1803 and ended in 1806, was the first party of men that went through the North American continent, then returned. During these three years, the leaders Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, along with Sergeant Gass and Sergeant Ordway, wrote page after page about their trip, describing the new plants and animals species they discovered and drawing the maps of unknown areas. In Discoveries, you play one of the Expedition members: Lewis, Clark, Gass or Ordway. Your goal is to compile as much knowledge as possible in your journal, and in this way advance science thanks to your discoveries. The Tribe/Discoveries cards you gain during the game score discovery points at the end. To get these cards, you have to perform exploration actions, and to do this you use dice. On your turn, you either: Play the dice in your action area or on the game board; by doing this, you prepare or perform the exploration, change your dice, or get new possible actions. Get dice back from the game board or from your opponents' action areas.

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Divinare
0 expansion(s).

London, November 17th, 1896: The streets of the city are almost deserted, traveled only by passersby whose only goal seems to reach their warm homes as quickly as possible. But in the private salons of a luxury Bloomsbury hotel, the goal is something completely different. The fifty greatest known mediums are taking part in a never-before-seen tournament in order to determine which one is the most powerful of all. The final table opens in a few minutes and you will be joining it. Who will win the £1,000 reserved for the winner? In Divinare — pronounced "di-vin-AH-ray", with the stress on the penultimate syllable — the players play the part of famous mediums who must attempt to divine the cards held by their opponents. In each round, only two-thirds of the cards — representing the four divination methods of chiromancy, crystallomancy, tasseomancy and astromancy — are dealt out, and are then revealed little-by-little, giving the players the possibility of narrowing their predictions. A good prediction will allow the players to win points, but guess wrong and you may be forced to take a penalty. The player with the most points after a set number of rounds wins.

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Dixit
4 expansion(s).

2010 Spiel des Jahres Winner One player is the storyteller for the turn and looks at the images on the 6 cards in her hand. From one of these, she makes up a sentence and says it out loud (without showing the card to the other players). Each other player selects the card in their hands which best matches the sentence and gives the selected card to the storyteller, without showing it to the others. The storyteller shuffles her card with all the received cards. All pictures are shown face up and every player has to bet upon which picture was the storyteller's. If nobody or everybody finds the correct card, the storyteller scores 0, and each of the other players scores 2. Otherwise the storyteller and whoever found the correct answer score 3. Players score 1 point for every vote for their own card. The game ends when the deck is empty or if a player scores 30 points. In either case, the player with the most points wins the game. The base game and all expansions have 84 cards each.

Expansions

  Dixit Quest

  Dixit 3: Journey

  Dixit: Origins

  Dixit: Daydreams


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Dixit Jinx
0 expansion(s).

Jinx is a new Game in the Dixit family. Unlike the original game, the drawings are not realistic illustrations depicting scenes but more abstract images. During the game, 9 cards are placed face-up in a 3x3 square. The active player draws a locator map that will show him which of the nine cards he will play with. This location is kept secret. The player speaks, sings, or acts out something relating to this card (just as in "Dixit"). The other players go around and point to the card they think is correct. Only one player can point to each card. Once a player has chosen the right card, the turn stops. The player who finds the right card keeps it. Each card counts as a victory point. Players who were wrong give their cards to the active player. But if neither player gets the right card, the active player must return a previously won card.

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Dixit Odyssey
0 expansion(s).

Dixit Odyssey is both a standalone game and an expansion (Dixit Odyssey (expansion)) for Jean-Louis Roubira's Dixit, which won Germany's Spiel des Jahres award in 2010. Game play in Dixit Odyssey matches that of Dixit: Each turn one player is the storyteller. This player secretly chooses one card in his hand, then gives a word or sentence to describe this card—but not too obviously. Each other player chooses a card in hand that matches this word/sentence and gives it to the storyteller. The storyteller then lays out the cards, and all other players vote on which card belongs to the storyteller. If no one or everyone guesses the storyteller's card, the storyteller receives no points and all players receive two; otherwise the storyteller and the correct guesser(s) each receive three points. Players score one point for each vote their image receives. Players refill their hands, and the next player becomes the storyteller. When the deck runs out, the player with the most points wins. Dixit Odyssey contains 84 new cards, each with a unique image drawn by Pierô and colored by Marie Cardouat, artist of Dixit and Dixit 2. The stand alone version also includes a folding game board, 6 new rabbit scoring tokens (12 total), and a box large enough to hold all the Dixit cards released to date. The stand alone version of Dixit Odyssey includes enough components for up to twelve players and also has variant rules for team play and for new ways to play with the cards. Expansion versus standalone versions of the game. Standalone version is in a square box (released in 2011 but may still be available). Expansion version is in a rectangular box (available from 2013 onwards): Dixit Odyssey (expansion)

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Dogs of War
0 expansion(s).

Dogs of War is an elegant game set in a steampunk-influenced renaissance universe. Noble houses engage each other in a series of fierce battles, and it's up to the players and the Dogs of War they control to deploy their private armies in support of whatever house they wish to favor. Clockwork knights and imposing war machines shift the tides of war as they enter the battlefields, but the interest of their Dog of War captains actually lie in the rewards offered by each noble house to its supporters. Each Dog of War has a special ability that helps them claim influence, win battles, or betray the house to which they've sworn allegiance! Dogs of War is not a game of pure military power, but rather a game in which deception and betrayal often lead the way to a decisive victory. The goal for the Dogs of War is to earn the most power by the end of the game. Thanks to thoughtful game design and development, there are many ways to achieve this, like defeating other captains in battle, getting rewards from the Houses you help, amassing gold and troops, and most importantly, gaining influence with the most successful Houses.

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Dokmus
0 expansion(s).

Lead your tribe to glory on the island of Dokmus and become a legend! Dokmus is a board game for 2-4 players. Your goal is to lead an expedition to the island of Dokmus, the ancestral god of your tribe. The island is represented by eight double-sided map pieces. During set-up, you randomize which side of each map piece is up and place them in a 3x3 grid so that the middle place is left empty. The island is guarded by five Guardians, which are represented by Guardian cards. On each turn, players draft the Guardian cards so that each player gets the help of one Guardian. The Guardian cards decide turn order and they also give you special powers. With them, you can move and rotate, move your tokens, or gain first player marker for next turn. On your turn, you have three tokens to use. You use tokens to spread your influence by placing them on the board. You can also sacrifice tokens to be able to cross waters or enter forests. Or you can just sacrifice them in a volcano. At the end of the game, you get victory points for discovered temples and ruins on the map as well as sacrificed tokens. The layout of the islands changes constantly based on player actions, making Dokmus a dynamic, fast-paced game. So choose your Guardian, make the right sacrifices, and gain the favor of Dokmus!

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Domaine
0 expansion(s).

The king shall return... But before he does, the realm falls into anarchy and chaos. The lords of the kingdom struggle to improve their place and standing. New borders are drawn, and expanded through strength of arms and subtle maneuver. Each duke seeks to establish a claim over the most valuable parts of the kingdom before the king finally returns. In the dark of the Middle Ages, control of the land was the key to wealth and power. Can you control enough territory to become the most prestigious duke before the king’s return? In Domaine, players form domaines by placing walls on the modular board to enclose territory. Completed domaines can then be expanded, even into your opponents'. Protect domaines by placing knights, which resist expansion. Actions are taken by playing cards that have a cost associated with them. Gain money by selling cards and controlling mines. Sold cards can be acquired by other players. Players score points based on the quantity and type of terrain enclosed in their domaines, as well as by controlling many mines of a single type. The winner is the first player to cross a specific point threshold or the player with the most points when the card deck runs out.

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Dominant Species
0 expansion(s).

Game Overview 90,000 B.C. — A great ice age is fast approaching. Another titanic struggle for global supremacy has unwittingly commenced between the varying animal species. Dominant Species is a game that abstractly recreates a tiny portion of ancient history: the ponderous encroachment of an ice age and what that entails for the living creatures trying to adapt to the slowly-changing earth. Each player will assume the role of one of six major animal classes—mammal, reptile, bird, amphibian, arachnid, or insect. Each begins the game more or less in a state of natural balance in relation to one another. But that won’t last: It is indeed "survival of the fittest". Through wily action pawn placement, players will strive to become dominant on as many different terrain tiles as possible in order to claim powerful card effects. Players will also want to propagate their individual species in order to earn victory points for their particular animal. Players will be aided in these endeavors via speciation, migration, and adaptation actions, among others. All of this eventually leads to the end game—the final ascent of the ice age—where the player having accumulated the most victory points will have his animal crowned the Dominant Species. But somebody better become dominant quickly, because it’s getting mighty cold... Game Play The large hexagonal tiles are used throughout the game to create an ever-expanding interpretation of earth as it might have appeared a thousand centuries ago. The smaller tundra tiles will be placed atop the larger tiles—converting them into tundra in the process—as the ice age encroaches. The cylindrical action pawns (or "AP"s) drive the game. Each AP will allow a player to perform the various actions that can be taken, such as speciation, environmental change, migration, or glaciation. After being placed on the action display during the Planning Phase, an AP will trigger that particular action for the owning player during the Execution Phase. Generally, players will be trying to enhance their own animal’s survivability while simultaneously trying to hinder that of their opponents’—hopefully collecting valuable victory points (or "VP"s) along the way. The various cards will aid in these efforts, giving players useful one-time abilities or an opportunity for recurring VP gains. Throughout the game, species cubes will be added to, moved about in, and removed from the tiles in play (the "earth"). Element disks will be added to and removed from both animals and earth. When the game ends, players will conduct a final scoring of each tile—after which the player controlling the animal with the highest VP total wins the game. Reimplemented by Dominant Species: The Card Game

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Dominion
3 expansion(s).

(from the back of the box:) "You are a monarch, like your parents before you, a ruler of a small pleasant kingdom of rivers and evergreens. Unlike your parents, however, you have hopes and dreams! You want a bigger and more pleasant kingdom, with more rivers and a wider variety of trees. You want a Dominion! In all directions lie fiefs, freeholds, and feodums. All are small bits of land, controlled by petty lords and verging on anarchy. You will bring civilization to these people, uniting them under your banner. But wait! It must be something in the air; several other monarchs have had the exact same idea. You must race to get as much of the unclaimed land as possible, fending them off along the way. To do this you will hire minions, construct buildings, spruce up your castle, and fill the coffers of your treasury. Your parents wouldn't be proud, but your grandparents, on your mother's side, would be delighted." In Dominion, each player starts with an identical, very small deck of cards. In the center of the table is a selection of other cards the players can "buy" as they can afford them. Through their selection of cards to buy, and how they play their hands as they draw them, the players construct their deck on the fly, striving for the most efficient path to the precious victory points by game end. Dominion is not a CCG, but the play of the game is similar to the construction and play of a CCG deck. The game comes with 500 cards. You select 10 of the 25 Kingdom card types to include in any given play—leading to immense variety. Part of the Dominion series. Integrates with: Dominion: Intrigue

Expansions

  Dominion: Seaside

  Dominion: Walled Village Promo Card

  Dominion: Governor Promo Card


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Dominion: Intrigue
0 expansion(s).

In Dominion: Intrigue (as with Dominion), each player starts with an identical, very small deck of cards. In the center of the table is a selection of other cards the players can "buy" as they can afford them. Through their selection of cards to buy, and how they play their hands as they draw them, the players construct their deck on the fly, striving for the most efficient path to the precious victory points by game end. From the back of the box: "Something’s afoot. The steward smiles at you like he has a secret, or like he thinks you have a secret, or like you think he thinks you have a secret. There are secret plots brewing, you’re sure of it. At the very least, there are yours. A passing servant murmurs, “The eggs are on the plate.” You frantically search your codebook for the translation before realizing he means that breakfast is ready. Excellent. Everything is going according to plan." Dominion: Intrigue adds rules for playing with up to 8 players at two tables or for playing a single game with up to 6 players when combined with Dominion. This game adds 25 new Kingdom cards and a complete set of Treasure and Victory cards. The game can be played alone by players experienced in Dominion or with the basic game of Dominion. Part of the Dominion series. Integrates with: Dominion Also released as an expansion that requires the base game or card set to play: Dominion: Die Intrige – Erweiterung.

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Don't Give Up the Ship
0 expansion(s).

Don't Give Up The Ship is a detailed set of miniatures rules set published by Guidon and later TSR. The 58-page booklet covers Age of Sail actions from the Napoleonic period. The rules allow players to recreate naval actions of the days of the American Revolution and War of 1812, including both detailed single ship actions and fleet actions. Eight single ship scenarios from the War of 1812 are included, as well as ten historical actions from 1793 to 1812. The rules include sections on Sighting, Burning Ships, Special Guns, Weatherliness, Repairs, Seamanship, Water Depth, and optional Shot Weight Rules.

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Dr. Eureka
0 expansion(s).

The brilliant Dr. Eureka has important experiments for you to complete! You must solve his scientific formulas by mixing the molecules from tube to tube without touching them with your bare hands. Transfer your molecules faster than your competition in Dr. Eureka to prove you're the smartest scientist in the lab...

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Dragon Run
0 expansion(s).

In Dragon Run, the players have just raided a dragon's keep, picked up a bunch of loot, and awakened the dragon. Now it's time to flee, ideally making it out with both our treasures and our lives. On each turn, a player can either advance boldly, flee cautiously, or cry like a baby. If you advance boldly, you draw a card from the location deck, which holds three types of cards: one that allows that player to either redraw or stop, one that grants new treasure from the treasure hall, and (of course) the dragon. If you draw the dragon, you lose one health point (out of two), the dragon calms down (i.e., it loses one temper point), and the location deck is reshuffled. If you're injured twice, you die and are out of the game. When fleeing cautiously, you first discard a treasure worth at least one coin, then roll a d10. If your roll is higher than the number of cards in the location deck, the dragon calms down, then you reshuffle the location deck; otherwise you must draw a card from the location deck just as when someone advances boldly. Your sacrificed treasure is still lost. When you cry like a baby, you don't draw a location card, instead discarding a treasure worth at least two coins. Having shown your obeisance to the dragon, the turn passes to the next player. Players start with four treasure cards; while some cards are worth 1-5 coins, others provide a one-shot potion or a talisman that stays in effect until the location deck is shuffled, which ends the round. Gameplay lasts from 5 to 8 rounds. Each player has a unique power that can be used once per round: the thief can steal cards from opponents, the cleric can heal opponents in exchange for treasure, etc. If the dragon loses its final temper point, the game ends and whoever holds the most valuable treasure wins; if all of the adventurers are charred to death first, then the dragon wins instead!

Expansions


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Dragonheart
0 expansion(s).

Dragons, knights, trolls, princesses, dwarves, and other fantasy characters make up the world of Dragonheart. Dragons are searching for treasure, of course, but they're being pursued by dragon hunters, and those are the two sides that face off in this game. On a turn, a player plays one or more cards with the same motif, then refills his hand to five cards. The cards are always played onto the part of the game board that has the same motif. By laying out cards, a player collects point cards that are already present. This is how the dragon collects treasure cards, for example, but the third dragon hunter defeats the dragon, while a second knight protects the princess. Other combinations await the players, and whoever collects the most points wins.

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Drakon (first edition)
0 expansion(s).

From the back of the box: In the dragon's vaults... The ancient dragon lifts her head from where she lies on the sprawling treasure hoard. Her magical senses quicken and the blood begins to surge in her veins as the faint sounds of intruders reach her ears. Greedy adventurers have invaded her home once again! Drakon is old and tired and is not quite ready for dinner, so she decides to play a little game with her visitors... Greed Will Set You Free! You are trapped in the dark magical vaults of the evil dragon, and only one of your party will survive. Collect as much gold as you can carry and be the first to escape the magical vaults. Otherwise, you're dinner! DRAKON is an entertaining boardgame of chases, tricks, and traps. Build Drakon's vaults tile-by-tile as you race for the prize and attempt to thwart your opponents's every move.

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Drakon (fourth edition)
0 expansion(s).

Game description from the publisher: You have been caught looting the hoard of the dreaded Drakon. For such transgression, a fiery death should be the only appropriate response — but Drakon has decided to toy with you before she devours you. You and your rival heroes will each be released into the labyrinth, and the first hero to discover ten gold pieces will go free with his treasure. The rest of you will satisfy the dragon's hunger. In every game of Drakon, you and your opponents must fight to stay alive in the midst of the labyrinth. On your turn, you can either move your hero to another room, or add another piece to the labyrinth, placing beneficial chambers in your own path and throwing your opponents into harm's way. But you must be cautious. The chambers of Drakon's labyrinth are filled with danger and ancient magics, not to mention the dragon herself. To navigate these deadly corridors and survive, you’ll need to be quick and careful. On every turn, you have a crucial choice to make. You can either move forward into a new chamber, or you can expand the labyrinth by playing a new chamber tile from your hand. The new chambers that you play feature unique circumstances and magical objects that you may encounter on your adventures through Drakon's lair. The majority of these chambers offer powerful effects to any hero that enters the chamber. You may gain the power to destroy any chamber in the labyrinth, or call a windstorm to carry you along, increasing your movement. You may even take command of a floating chamber and fly it to the other side of the labyrinth. Other chambers force more harmful effects on those heroes unlucky enough to enter. A room may cause you to lose a coin as you avoid the dangers within, and any hero who hears the siren song of the magical harp is forced to move into its chamber. As you and your fellow heroes play these chambers from your hand, they form a cunning maze, and only the wise can find their way out. Despite the power of these chambers, the central goal of your quest is to find gold: only by being the first player to claim ten gold can you escape the dungeon. Plenty of chambers allow you to find a coin or steal a coin from an opponent, but the gold value of coins can vary dramatically. Your most recently stolen coin may have a value of three gold or just one. Because coins are kept face-down, hiding their value, you'll never know exactly how close your opponents are to victory. Six heroes are trapped within Drakon's sadistic labyrinth, and each hero has his own unique abilities to help him survive. Each ability can only be used once per game though, making the timing of the ability incredibly important. You may play as the sorceress and escape from a most dire situation by passing through a wall. You may play as the thief and collect the gold you need at the most opportune moment by preying on another hero. You may even play as the ranger and use a burst of speed to race across the maze when necessary. No matter which hero you play in a game of Drakon, you'll need to take full advantage of your unique ability at the opportune moment if you want to grab the gold and escape from Drakon's clutches. Of course, the heroes are not alone in the labyrinth. The legendary dragon also stalks the halls and chambers of the maze, taunting any hero unlucky enough to encounter her. Certain chambers throughout the labyrinth allow you to move Drakon through the dungeon. If you can move Drakon into the same chamber as a hapless hero, that hero is immediately sent back to the entrance chamber and loses three coins, as Drakon toys with him before releasing him once more into the maze. You and your rival heroes are trapped. Your greatest threat may be Drakon or the other heroes. In this dark labyrinth, only one thing can save you: your own greed. Will you ruthlessly grab gold and undermine your opponent’s schemes before escaping to victory? Or will you fail and become just another meal for the dragon? You decide your fate, but only one hero can escape from Drakon!

Expansions


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Drakon (third edition)
0 expansion(s).

The old dragon Drakon has captured a brave band of adventurers who have sneaked into her lair to steal her gold. But rather than eat them immediately, Drakon has decided to make it a game: Greed shall set one of the adventurers free. She sends the frightened adventurers into her magical, mad vaulted chambers, and the first one to collect ten gold from Drakon’s maze gets to go free. The rest get to be lunch. Each turn, players must choose one of two options: (1) place a tile from their hand onto the board, expanding the dungeon; or (2) move their Hero to an adjacent tile. Many of the dungeon tiles have an icon that allows players entering that space to take a special action (for example, taking a piece of gold from the dragon's hoard, stealing gold from another player, or destroying a tile that is already in play). This is the third edition of Drakon, and includes the following updates: plastic miniatures are used for the heroes and the Drakon new tiles are larger (measuring 2.5 by 2.5 inches) and have all new artwork tiles include a combination of rooms from Drakon (second edition) and Drakon Expansion 1 new rules, variants, and player aids are provided each gold piece now has a value between 1 and 3 In the basic game, the first player to earn 10 gold wins the game. Some variants provide different winning conditions. Game last between 20 and 60 minutes.

Expansions


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DreadBall Xtreme
0 expansion(s).

DreadBall Xtreme is the underground sports game of the future and the follow-up to DreadBall: The Futuristic Sports Game. In this game, two teams battle it out on the pitch to outscore each other, with all-new twists: • No Referee = More Violence for Everyone: with no one to stop the bloodshed, anything goes! Sucker punches and stomps are the norm, and the introduction of explosive collars, deadly traps and bloodsucking aliens only increase the level of violence. • Customize your Battlefield: games are organized in prisons and warehouses at a moment’s notice, using industrial scenery to shake things up - everywhere from the scoring zone to the ball launch location can change! • Play as Enigmatic Sponsors: the powerful organizers behind the game, Sponsors dictate your play-style and are experts in intimidation, blackmail and illegal gambling. Best of all, Sponsors allow you to build entirely unique teams out of any player combination you like! Are you ready for an all-new ball game? DreadBall Xtreme is a standalone game based in the same world as DreadBall and cross-compatible with it, but DreadBall is not required for play.

Expansions


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DreadBall: The Futuristic Sports Game
3 expansion(s).

Game description from the publisher: DreadBall: The Futuristic Sports Game is the hyper-kinetic sci-fi sports game of unparalleled speed and ferocity – a fast, fun and tactical miniature sports board game written by Jake Thornton and created by Mantic Games. Two coaches compete for victory with teams of beautiful miniatures on a stunning sci-fi pitch. The game is easy to learn, yet challenging, with carefully orchestrated plays and counter attacks hinging on positioning and the mercy of the dice gods. Created by the finest sculptors, artists and game designers, DreadBall: The Futuristic Sports Game is the first in a series of visually stunning sci-fi sports games, to be supported with expansions introducing new teams and exciting new game play, building on the already impressive 84-page full-colour A4 rulebook.

Expansions

  DreadBall: Midgard Delvers

  DreadBall: Skittersneak Stealers

  Dreadball: Season 5


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Dschunke
0 expansion(s).

Asia's floating markets are pulsating with life. Junks are packed tightly together, bursting with loads of exotic goods from every part of the world. Merchants and their trainees move from boat to boat across narrow wooden foot-bridges, buying for the big markets in the city. In order to make the best deals is it important to be at right Junk at the right time. Skillful coordination of your actions is vital, if you want to become one of Asia's most respected Trade dealers.

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Dungeon Fighter
0 expansion(s).

Explore spooky dungeons, find glorious treasure, buy powerful magic items, and challenge the most horrible creatures. Will your party be able to defeat the final boss? In Dungeon Fighter, a fully cooperative board game, players take on the roles of heroes venturing deep into a three-tier dungeon. Along the way, they explore the dungeon, search its many rooms, and face endless hordes of vicious monsters. Best of all, your skill determines the ability of your character. Can you kill Medusa without looking into her eyes, defeat the Minotaur in the labyrinth, or resist the breath of the dragon? Will you be able to hit a target by throwing the dice under your leg with your eyes closed? You will feel truly part of a centuries-old battle between good and evil...with a touch of foolish stupidity.

Expansions


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Dungeon Lords
1 expansion(s).

In Dungeon Lords, you are an evil dungeonlord who is trying to build the best dungeon out there. You hire monsters, build rooms, buy traps and defeat the do-gooders who wish to bring you down. From the publisher's webpage: Have you ever ventured with party of heroes to conquer dungeons, gain pride, experiences and of course rich treasure? And has it ever occurred to you how hard it actually is to build and manage such underground complex filled with corridors and creatures? No? Well now you can try. Put yourself in role of the master of underground, summon your servants, dig complex of tunnels and rooms, set traps, hire creatures and try to stop filthy heroes from conquering and plundering your precious creation. We can guarantee you will look on dark corners, lairs and their inhabitant from completely different perspective! Each turn, players use a hand of cards to choose where to place their worker. Actions vary from mining gold, hiring monsters, buying traps etc. Each action has three spots available - with each spot having different effects (e.g. mining gold lets you mine more gold in each spot). When using the cards, two cards will become locked and will not be able to be used next turn. There are 4 turns to place actions for each game "year" and two game years in a whole game. Each turn is identified as a "season". Each season, players will get to see the heroes and events to come in the following season. Thus allowing them to prepare. At the end of each season (after the first), heroes will be allocated to each player according to their level of evil. Heroes range from mighty heroes to sneaky thieves. Each hero has their own power for which the player needs to prepare for. Finally, at the end of each year, the heroes will travel down into the dungeon to fight. Scoring in the game is based upon what you have built, the monsters you have hired and the heroes you have captured.

Expansions

  Dungeon Lords: Festival Season


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Dungeon Petz
1 expansion(s).

Become the leader of an imp family that has just started a new business – breeding and selling petz. Sound simple and safe? Well, we forgot to mention that those petz are for Dungeon Lords. This means magical, playful, sometimes angry monsters that constantly desire attention and at the very moment you want them to demonstrate their qualities to buyers they are sick or they poop. Sometimes you are even glad that you got rid of them – but the profit is unbelievable. Dungeon Petz is a standalone game set in the Dungeon Lords universe. The game consists of several rounds in which players use unusual worker placement mechanisms (players simultaneously prepare different sized groups of imps in order to play sooner than others) to prepare themselves for the uneasy task of raising creature cubs and pleasing their different needs (represented by cards) in order to sell them as grown and scary creatures to Dungeon Lords. In the meantime, they also attend various contests in which they show off their pets, scoring additional points.

Expansions

  Dungeon Petz: Dark Alleys


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Dungeon Twister
1 expansion(s).

Dungeon Twister is a 2-player high level strategy game where 2 teams of adventurers with various powers are trapped in a dungeon. The board is composed of 8 rooms that can be moved and rotated by the players. Each turn, a player is able to spend actions to move around the dungeon, pick up and use items, battle with the opponents team, or turn and move the rooms of the dungeon. The goal is to reach 5 victory points. Points are collected by moving adventurers out of the dungeon or by killing an opponent's adventurer. Objects are disseminated across the whole dungeon and will bring the adventurers well-needed powers. Each player has the same characters, each with different powers. Some run fast, some fight or disarm traps. The cleric heals, magician burns everything in sight, and the goblin is so weak that the simple fact of getting him out will bring you two victory points. Combat and actions are managed via cards. To move, fight, heal, or turn a room, you must manage action points obtained by playing cards. Those cards are not drawn but selected from a set of cards by both players. Both players have access to the same panel of cards at the beginning of the game, so the game is really about managing the resources and adapting to the changing environment. Dungeon Twister is the original game in the Dungeon Twister series

Expansions

  Dungeon Twister: 3/4 Players Expansion


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Dungeon Twister 2: Prison
0 expansion(s).

Dungeon Twister 2: Prison will re-launch the Dungeon Twister franchise with second edition rules. It will contain 16 miniatures, new rooms, new characters, a tutorial in 5 scenarios, a larger box and best of all, rules for Solitaire play! Solitaire play features six levels of difficulty to provide a challenge to even the most experienced of players. The Second Edition rules include a 5-step scenario-based tutorial. The introductory level is simple enough for an eight-year-old to learn. This product will be backwards-compatible with all existing Dungeon Twister products. Asmodee Publisher Blurb: Fight, get out or die Dungeon Twister is a strategy game for two players. You control a team of eight adventurers with varied and necessary abilities. Your objective: to escape from the Dungeon. Unfortunately, in front of you lies a vast labyrinth of dangerous rooms which can rotate thanks to the astonishing mechanisms constructed by dwarves. These deadly traps and twistings to prevent you from escaping would be enough of a challenge by themselves, but you also face another group of adventurers with the same goal as yourself. Without relying on dice, Dungeon Twister calls upon all of your tactics and strategies, your ability to bluff, your anticipation of the danger and your management of combat and action cards.

Expansions


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